The effect of a healthy lifestyle programme on 8–9 year olds from social disadvantage

Gavin Breslin, Deirdre Brennan, Ruth Rafferty, Alison Gallagher, Donncha Hanna

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims This study assessed the effi cacy of a schoolbased healthy lifestyle intervention (Sport for LIFE) for increasing physical activity, decreasing sedentary behaviour, reducing screen time behaviour, encouraging healthy attitudes and behaviour to nutrition, andreducing body mass index (BMI) in 8–9-year-old primary school children from lower socioeconomic backgrounds in Northern Ireland. Methods A non-randomised controlled trial of 416 children from 24 schools took part. Schools were randomly assigned to one of two groups, an intervention or control group with 12 schools in each group. The intervention group received a 12-week school-based programme based on social cognitive theory. At baseline and follow-up, groups completed questionnaires assessing physical activity, screen time behaviour and dietary patterns. On each occasion anthropometric assessments of height and weight were taken. Physical activity and sedentary behaviour were measured by accelerometry. Results Signifi cant effects were observed for vigorous,moderate and light activity for the intervention group at follow-up. Sedentary behaviour was significantly reduced for the intervention group but not for the control group. No significant effects of the intervention on BMI, screen time behaviour or attitudes to nutrition, with theexception of non-core foods, were shown. Conclusions The programme was effective inincreasing physical activity and reducing sedentary behaviour, however no signifi cant changes in screen time behaviour and attitude to nutrition, with the exception of non-core foods, were observed. Future research ideas are offered for tackling low levels of physical activity in children.
LanguageEnglish
JournalArchives of disease in childhood
Volume0
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 26 Mar 2012

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Exercise
Body Mass Index
Accelerometry
Healthy Lifestyle
Food
Northern Ireland
Control Groups
Sports
Light
Weights and Measures

Cite this

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title = "The effect of a healthy lifestyle programme on 8–9 year olds from social disadvantage",
abstract = "Aims This study assessed the effi cacy of a schoolbased healthy lifestyle intervention (Sport for LIFE) for increasing physical activity, decreasing sedentary behaviour, reducing screen time behaviour, encouraging healthy attitudes and behaviour to nutrition, andreducing body mass index (BMI) in 8–9-year-old primary school children from lower socioeconomic backgrounds in Northern Ireland. Methods A non-randomised controlled trial of 416 children from 24 schools took part. Schools were randomly assigned to one of two groups, an intervention or control group with 12 schools in each group. The intervention group received a 12-week school-based programme based on social cognitive theory. At baseline and follow-up, groups completed questionnaires assessing physical activity, screen time behaviour and dietary patterns. On each occasion anthropometric assessments of height and weight were taken. Physical activity and sedentary behaviour were measured by accelerometry. Results Signifi cant effects were observed for vigorous,moderate and light activity for the intervention group at follow-up. Sedentary behaviour was significantly reduced for the intervention group but not for the control group. No significant effects of the intervention on BMI, screen time behaviour or attitudes to nutrition, with theexception of non-core foods, were shown. Conclusions The programme was effective inincreasing physical activity and reducing sedentary behaviour, however no signifi cant changes in screen time behaviour and attitude to nutrition, with the exception of non-core foods, were observed. Future research ideas are offered for tackling low levels of physical activity in children.",
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The effect of a healthy lifestyle programme on 8–9 year olds from social disadvantage. / Breslin, Gavin; Brennan, Deirdre; Rafferty, Ruth; Gallagher, Alison; Hanna, Donncha.

In: Archives of disease in childhood, Vol. 0, 26.03.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - Aims This study assessed the effi cacy of a schoolbased healthy lifestyle intervention (Sport for LIFE) for increasing physical activity, decreasing sedentary behaviour, reducing screen time behaviour, encouraging healthy attitudes and behaviour to nutrition, andreducing body mass index (BMI) in 8–9-year-old primary school children from lower socioeconomic backgrounds in Northern Ireland. Methods A non-randomised controlled trial of 416 children from 24 schools took part. Schools were randomly assigned to one of two groups, an intervention or control group with 12 schools in each group. The intervention group received a 12-week school-based programme based on social cognitive theory. At baseline and follow-up, groups completed questionnaires assessing physical activity, screen time behaviour and dietary patterns. On each occasion anthropometric assessments of height and weight were taken. Physical activity and sedentary behaviour were measured by accelerometry. Results Signifi cant effects were observed for vigorous,moderate and light activity for the intervention group at follow-up. Sedentary behaviour was significantly reduced for the intervention group but not for the control group. No significant effects of the intervention on BMI, screen time behaviour or attitudes to nutrition, with theexception of non-core foods, were shown. Conclusions The programme was effective inincreasing physical activity and reducing sedentary behaviour, however no signifi cant changes in screen time behaviour and attitude to nutrition, with the exception of non-core foods, were observed. Future research ideas are offered for tackling low levels of physical activity in children.

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