The contacts which families and children with learning disabilities have with health and social services.

Roy McConkey, Dermot McAteer

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    This study summarises all the documented service inputs which families who had a child classed as having learning disabilities, received from one community Health and Social Services Trust in N. Ireland during the twelve month period April 1996-March 1997.Using data obtained from three computer-based recording systems used in N. Ireland - Child Health Record (Module V); L-CID and Soscare - this paper documents the extent and type of service provision for this population. In all, eleven different health professionals were involved while social services offered a further five service inputs. However the services provided varied across different age groupings of children and severity of the disability. Similarities and differences are noted between the Trust’s services and those reported in a national U.K. survey of parents with disabled children. Four key issues are discussed in the light of the Children (NI) Order; the development of a common database for this population; the criteria used to determine which children receive a service and those who do not; the co-ordination of service inputs and the failure of present computer systems to record the outcomes of service inputs.
    LanguageEnglish
    Pages67-73
    JournalChild Care in Practice
    Volume5
    Issue number2
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 1999

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    mobile social services
    health service
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    Ireland
    health professionals
    grouping
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    parents
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    present
    health
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    Cite this

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    The contacts which families and children with learning disabilities have with health and social services. / McConkey, Roy; McAteer, Dermot.

    In: Child Care in Practice, Vol. 5, No. 2, 01.07.1999, p. 67-73.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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