The changing role of education in the Iraqi disputed territories: assimilation, segregation and indoctrination

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The oil-rich northern districts of Iraq were long considered a reflection of the country with a diversity of ethnic and religious groups: Arabs, Turkmen, Kurds, Assyrians, and Yezidi, living together and portraying Iraq's demographic make-up. Yet the territory has suffered from heightening ethno-political influence and sectarianism throughout its recent history. The ethnic basis to territorial claims has amplified the discourse over linguistic presence, cultural representation and minority rights across the region and elevated debates over territorial representation to the height of ethnic survival issues. This paper will explore the changing face of education in the region over the last 12 years, highlighting the way in which education policy has reflected, and reacted to, national fragility and conflict.
LanguageEnglish
Pages422-433
JournalGlobalisation, Societies and Education
Volume14
Issue number3
Early online date30 Jun 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Jul 2016

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assimilation
Iraq
segregation
Kurd
minority rights
religious group
political influence
Arab
education
ethnic group
district
linguistics
discourse
history

Keywords

  • Disputed territories
  • Iraq
  • education
  • conflict
  • identity
  • ISIS

Cite this

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Vol. 14, No. 3, 02.07.2016, p. 422-433.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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