The changing landscape of tourism in Northern Ireland: the potential role for dark/political tourism to shape part of that landscape.

Research output: Other contribution

Abstract

This paper explores the development of tourism in Northern Ireland over time, from the years before overt violence started (1969), through what have been termed the ‘Troubles’ (1969-1994), to the years post violence (1994 to the present day). This discourse takes place in the wider context of political and dark tourism; where the sites, memorials, events of the past turbulent years have become part of the wider tourism fabric today. Part of this discussion is based on research undertaken on how the industry perceives political/dark tourism and if the conditions across the various sectors/organisations are in place to make this a long-term viable product and experience. The paper also aims to illustrate that dark and political tourism are but niche products that Northern Ireland can offer, particularly to its international visitors. The opportunity exists now to move toward a mature tourism destination that is free of overt violence as part of its image and where tourism has the potential to be a key player in the economy of Northern Ireland.
LanguageEnglish
TypeConference paper given at the 9th International Hospitality and Tourism Research Conference, HTMi
Publication statusPublished - 13 Nov 2012

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Tourism
violence
memorial
economy
industry
event
discourse
present
experience

Cite this

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title = "The changing landscape of tourism in Northern Ireland: the potential role for dark/political tourism to shape part of that landscape.",
abstract = "This paper explores the development of tourism in Northern Ireland over time, from the years before overt violence started (1969), through what have been termed the ‘Troubles’ (1969-1994), to the years post violence (1994 to the present day). This discourse takes place in the wider context of political and dark tourism; where the sites, memorials, events of the past turbulent years have become part of the wider tourism fabric today. Part of this discussion is based on research undertaken on how the industry perceives political/dark tourism and if the conditions across the various sectors/organisations are in place to make this a long-term viable product and experience. The paper also aims to illustrate that dark and political tourism are but niche products that Northern Ireland can offer, particularly to its international visitors. The opportunity exists now to move toward a mature tourism destination that is free of overt violence as part of its image and where tourism has the potential to be a key player in the economy of Northern Ireland.",
author = "Stephen Boyd",
year = "2012",
month = "11",
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The changing landscape of tourism in Northern Ireland: the potential role for dark/political tourism to shape part of that landscape. / Boyd, Stephen.

2012, Conference paper given at the 9th International Hospitality and Tourism Research Conference, HTMi.

Research output: Other contribution

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AB - This paper explores the development of tourism in Northern Ireland over time, from the years before overt violence started (1969), through what have been termed the ‘Troubles’ (1969-1994), to the years post violence (1994 to the present day). This discourse takes place in the wider context of political and dark tourism; where the sites, memorials, events of the past turbulent years have become part of the wider tourism fabric today. Part of this discussion is based on research undertaken on how the industry perceives political/dark tourism and if the conditions across the various sectors/organisations are in place to make this a long-term viable product and experience. The paper also aims to illustrate that dark and political tourism are but niche products that Northern Ireland can offer, particularly to its international visitors. The opportunity exists now to move toward a mature tourism destination that is free of overt violence as part of its image and where tourism has the potential to be a key player in the economy of Northern Ireland.

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