The Art of Teaching Anatomy - presentation

Cathal Breen, Sharon Conway, Karen Fleming, Helen Byrne, John McLachlan

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Traditional anatomy teaching promotes student engagement through use of hard plastic models, dry bones and, in some cases, cadaver dissection. It is questioned if any of these options are effective teaching methods especially as: ‘anatomical models cannot be palpated, auscultated or usefully asked to change position’ (McLachlan and Regan de Bere 2004). The primary learning outcome of anatomy teaching for health professionals is the ability of the student to apply anatomy knowledge to living human beings. This case study focuses on introduction of haptic teaching of anatomy, in the form of body painting, to BScHons radiography and clinical physiology undergraduate students at the University of Ulster.Key wordsHaptic learning, body painting, human anatomy, radiography, clinical physiology, student engagement.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationUnknown Host Publication
Number of pages24
Publication statusPublished - 6 Apr 2009
EventCHEP Inaugural Symposium -
Duration: 6 Apr 2009 → …

Conference

ConferenceCHEP Inaugural Symposium
Period6/04/09 → …

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physiology
Teaching
student
teaching method
health professionals
learning
human being
ability

Cite this

Breen, C., Conway, S., Fleming, K., Byrne, H., & McLachlan, J. (2009). The Art of Teaching Anatomy - presentation. In Unknown Host Publication
Breen, Cathal ; Conway, Sharon ; Fleming, Karen ; Byrne, Helen ; McLachlan, John. / The Art of Teaching Anatomy - presentation. Unknown Host Publication. 2009.
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title = "The Art of Teaching Anatomy - presentation",
abstract = "Traditional anatomy teaching promotes student engagement through use of hard plastic models, dry bones and, in some cases, cadaver dissection. It is questioned if any of these options are effective teaching methods especially as: ‘anatomical models cannot be palpated, auscultated or usefully asked to change position’ (McLachlan and Regan de Bere 2004). The primary learning outcome of anatomy teaching for health professionals is the ability of the student to apply anatomy knowledge to living human beings. This case study focuses on introduction of haptic teaching of anatomy, in the form of body painting, to BScHons radiography and clinical physiology undergraduate students at the University of Ulster.Key wordsHaptic learning, body painting, human anatomy, radiography, clinical physiology, student engagement.",
author = "Cathal Breen and Sharon Conway and Karen Fleming and Helen Byrne and John McLachlan",
note = "Reference text: Op Den Akker, J. W., A. Bohnen, et al. (2002). {"}Giving Color to a New Curriculum: Bodypaint As a Tool in Medical Education.{"} Clinical Anatomy 15: 356-362. McLachlan J. C, Bligh J, Bradley P, Searle J. (2004). Teaching anatomy without cadavers. Medical Education 2004 Apr;38(4):418-24 McLachlan J. C, and Patten D. (2006). Anatomy teaching: ghosts of the past, present and future. Medical Education 2006 Mar;40(3):243-53. McLachlan, J. C. and S. Regan De Bere (2004). {"}How We Teach Anatomy Without Cadavers.{"} THE CLINICAL TEACHER 1(2): 49-52. McMenamin, P. G. (2008). {"}Body Painting as a Tool in Clinical Anatomy Teaching.{"} Anatomical Sciences Education 1(July): 139-144. Rees CE, Bradley P, McLachlan J. C. (2004). Exploring medical students' attitudes towards peer physical examination. Medical Teaching 2004 Feb;26(1):86-8. Sternberg RJ & Williams WM(1996) How to develop student creativity. ASCD. USA",
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Breen, C, Conway, S, Fleming, K, Byrne, H & McLachlan, J 2009, The Art of Teaching Anatomy - presentation. in Unknown Host Publication. CHEP Inaugural Symposium, 6/04/09.

The Art of Teaching Anatomy - presentation. / Breen, Cathal; Conway, Sharon; Fleming, Karen; Byrne, Helen; McLachlan, John.

Unknown Host Publication. 2009.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

TY - GEN

T1 - The Art of Teaching Anatomy - presentation

AU - Breen, Cathal

AU - Conway, Sharon

AU - Fleming, Karen

AU - Byrne, Helen

AU - McLachlan, John

N1 - Reference text: Op Den Akker, J. W., A. Bohnen, et al. (2002). "Giving Color to a New Curriculum: Bodypaint As a Tool in Medical Education." Clinical Anatomy 15: 356-362. McLachlan J. C, Bligh J, Bradley P, Searle J. (2004). Teaching anatomy without cadavers. Medical Education 2004 Apr;38(4):418-24 McLachlan J. C, and Patten D. (2006). Anatomy teaching: ghosts of the past, present and future. Medical Education 2006 Mar;40(3):243-53. McLachlan, J. C. and S. Regan De Bere (2004). "How We Teach Anatomy Without Cadavers." THE CLINICAL TEACHER 1(2): 49-52. McMenamin, P. G. (2008). "Body Painting as a Tool in Clinical Anatomy Teaching." Anatomical Sciences Education 1(July): 139-144. Rees CE, Bradley P, McLachlan J. C. (2004). Exploring medical students' attitudes towards peer physical examination. Medical Teaching 2004 Feb;26(1):86-8. Sternberg RJ & Williams WM(1996) How to develop student creativity. ASCD. USA

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N2 - Traditional anatomy teaching promotes student engagement through use of hard plastic models, dry bones and, in some cases, cadaver dissection. It is questioned if any of these options are effective teaching methods especially as: ‘anatomical models cannot be palpated, auscultated or usefully asked to change position’ (McLachlan and Regan de Bere 2004). The primary learning outcome of anatomy teaching for health professionals is the ability of the student to apply anatomy knowledge to living human beings. This case study focuses on introduction of haptic teaching of anatomy, in the form of body painting, to BScHons radiography and clinical physiology undergraduate students at the University of Ulster.Key wordsHaptic learning, body painting, human anatomy, radiography, clinical physiology, student engagement.

AB - Traditional anatomy teaching promotes student engagement through use of hard plastic models, dry bones and, in some cases, cadaver dissection. It is questioned if any of these options are effective teaching methods especially as: ‘anatomical models cannot be palpated, auscultated or usefully asked to change position’ (McLachlan and Regan de Bere 2004). The primary learning outcome of anatomy teaching for health professionals is the ability of the student to apply anatomy knowledge to living human beings. This case study focuses on introduction of haptic teaching of anatomy, in the form of body painting, to BScHons radiography and clinical physiology undergraduate students at the University of Ulster.Key wordsHaptic learning, body painting, human anatomy, radiography, clinical physiology, student engagement.

M3 - Conference contribution

BT - Unknown Host Publication

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Breen C, Conway S, Fleming K, Byrne H, McLachlan J. The Art of Teaching Anatomy - presentation. In Unknown Host Publication. 2009