The appropriateness of luminance vs. energy as a descriptor of CRT stimulus output when measuring the temporal aspects of vision

Padraig Mulholland, Margarita Zlatkova, RS Anderson, David F. Garway-Heath, Tony Redmond

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The use of cathode-ray-tube monitors is widespread in the vision science community. The temporal response of these displays is, however, known to vary with the frame rate selected. No previous study has investigated if variations in frame rate impacts upon the temporal processing of spatially identical stimuli. In this study we found the upper limit of complete temporal summation for an achromatic spot stimulus to be greater at 60Hz compared with a frame rate of 160Hz when visual thresholds were classified using luminance output. No such variation was found when a novel metric quantifying total energy output was used. This finding has significant implications for the accurate quantification of visual thresholds collected using display monitors used in visual psychophysics investigations.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the ACM Symposium on Applied Perception (SAP 2013)
Place of PublicationNew York, USA
Pages140
Number of pages1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 22 Aug 2013

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Cathode ray tubes
Luminance
Display devices
Processing

Keywords

  • Cathode-ray-tube
  • temporal vision
  • summation
  • critical duration

Cite this

Mulholland, P., Zlatkova, M., Anderson, RS., Garway-Heath, D. F., & Redmond, T. (2013). The appropriateness of luminance vs. energy as a descriptor of CRT stimulus output when measuring the temporal aspects of vision. In Proceedings of the ACM Symposium on Applied Perception (SAP 2013) (pp. 140). New York, USA. https://doi.org/10.1145/2492494.2501897
Mulholland, Padraig ; Zlatkova, Margarita ; Anderson, RS ; Garway-Heath, David F. ; Redmond, Tony. / The appropriateness of luminance vs. energy as a descriptor of CRT stimulus output when measuring the temporal aspects of vision. Proceedings of the ACM Symposium on Applied Perception (SAP 2013). New York, USA, 2013. pp. 140
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The appropriateness of luminance vs. energy as a descriptor of CRT stimulus output when measuring the temporal aspects of vision. / Mulholland, Padraig; Zlatkova, Margarita; Anderson, RS; Garway-Heath, David F.; Redmond, Tony.

Proceedings of the ACM Symposium on Applied Perception (SAP 2013). New York, USA, 2013. p. 140.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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