Teaching on the Other Side: how identity affects the capacity for agency of teachers who have crossed the community divide in the Northern Ireland educational system

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The ethnic separation of the school system in Northern Ireland along Catholic and Protestant community lines limits opportunities for daily cross-community interaction between young people. Recent research has shown that, whilst the deployment pattern of teachers is largely consistent with this divide, a small proportion of teachers has diverted from the community-consistent path and are teaching in a school not associated with their own community background. Narrative interviews with a purposive sample of these cross-over teachers has provided rich insights into their experiences. The research presented here explores the extent to which these cross-over teachers felt able to reveal and engage their ethnic identity in their teaching. A mixed pattern is observed; whilst some had endeavoured to hide or disguise their identity, others had embraced their otherness and were consequently better placed to achieve agency in their practice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-18
Number of pages18
JournalOxford Review of Education
Early online date21 Jan 2021
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 21 Jan 2021

Keywords

  • Northern Ireland
  • Teacher identity
  • ethnic division
  • segregated education
  • teacher agency

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Teaching on the Other Side: how identity affects the capacity for agency of teachers who have crossed the community divide in the Northern Ireland educational system'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this