Teaching Across the Divide: perceived barriers to the movement of teachers across the traditional sectors in Northern Ireland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The community separation of the school system in Northern Ireland
limits opportunities for daily cross-community interaction between young
people. The deployment pattern of teachers is largely consistent with
this divide. Pupils are therefore unlikely to be taught by a teacher from
a community background other than their own. Nonetheless, recent
research has shown that an increased proportion of teachers are
diverting from the community consistent path and are teaching in a
school not associated with their own community identity, although this
remained a very uncommon choice. Narrative interviews with a
purposive sample of these ‘cross-over’ teachers provide illustrations of
the factors that preserve the separation of the teaching profession by
community identity. Thematic analysis of this data reveals that policy,
perceptions and practice combine to restrict the possibility of crosscommunity
career movement by teachers. If the out-workings of
community division in Northern Ireland are to be addressed, then these
issues will need to be considered, and actions taken to mitigate this
segregation.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages38
JournalBritish Journal of Educational Studies
Early online date15 Jul 2020
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 15 Jul 2020

Keywords

  • teacher identity
  • segregated education
  • community separation
  • Northern Ireland

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