Synthesis design of TiO2 nanotubes and nanowires and photocatalytic applications in the degradation of organic pollutants in the presence or not of microorganisms

Asma Turki, Pilar Fernández Ibáñez, Abdelhamid Ghorbel, Hafedh Kochkar, Chantal Guillard, Gilles Berhault

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

1 D TiO2 nanomaterials (nanotubes, nanowires) were synthesized through hydrothermal treatment of TiO2 powder (P25) in concentrated alkaline solutions (NaOH for nanotubes, KOH for nanowires) followed by calcination at varying temperatures between 400°C and 700°C Samples were characterized by HRTEM, XRD, Raman spectroscopy, and N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms. High surface area nanotubular TiO2 materials can maintain their 1D morphology up to a temperature of calcination of 400°C while changing their phase from hydrogenotitanate to anatase. The use of KOH leads to a retarded formation of anatase. Photocatalytic results showed that TiO2 anatase nanotubes calcined at 400°C can degrade formic acid with a rate constant four times higher than for P25. A direct correlation between surface area and photocatalytic activity explains the much higher activity of TiO2 anatase nanotubes. On the opposite, for the degradation of phenol, P25 remains more active. In the disinfection of water, contrary to P25, the high surface area of TiO2 nanotubes allows the simultaneous degradation of formic acid and the inactivation of pathogen fungus showing the interest of such materials for the treatment of wastewater.

LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationTitanium Dioxide Nanomaterials 2012
Pages13-18
Number of pages6
Volume1442
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2012
Event2012 MRS Spring Meeting - San Francisco, CA, United States
Duration: 9 Apr 201213 Apr 2012

Conference

Conference2012 MRS Spring Meeting
CountryUnited States
CitySan Francisco, CA
Period9/04/1213/04/12

Fingerprint

Organic pollutants
microorganisms
formic acid
Microorganisms
Nanotubes
Nanowires
contaminants
nanotubes
nanowires
anatase
Titanium dioxide
degradation
Degradation
synthesis
Formic acid
Calcination
roasting
pathogens
fungi
Disinfection

Cite this

Turki, Asma ; Ibáñez, Pilar Fernández ; Ghorbel, Abdelhamid ; Kochkar, Hafedh ; Guillard, Chantal ; Berhault, Gilles. / Synthesis design of TiO2 nanotubes and nanowires and photocatalytic applications in the degradation of organic pollutants in the presence or not of microorganisms. Titanium Dioxide Nanomaterials 2012. Vol. 1442 2012. pp. 13-18
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title = "Synthesis design of TiO2 nanotubes and nanowires and photocatalytic applications in the degradation of organic pollutants in the presence or not of microorganisms",
abstract = "1 D TiO2 nanomaterials (nanotubes, nanowires) were synthesized through hydrothermal treatment of TiO2 powder (P25) in concentrated alkaline solutions (NaOH for nanotubes, KOH for nanowires) followed by calcination at varying temperatures between 400°C and 700°C Samples were characterized by HRTEM, XRD, Raman spectroscopy, and N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms. High surface area nanotubular TiO2 materials can maintain their 1D morphology up to a temperature of calcination of 400°C while changing their phase from hydrogenotitanate to anatase. The use of KOH leads to a retarded formation of anatase. Photocatalytic results showed that TiO2 anatase nanotubes calcined at 400°C can degrade formic acid with a rate constant four times higher than for P25. A direct correlation between surface area and photocatalytic activity explains the much higher activity of TiO2 anatase nanotubes. On the opposite, for the degradation of phenol, P25 remains more active. In the disinfection of water, contrary to P25, the high surface area of TiO2 nanotubes allows the simultaneous degradation of formic acid and the inactivation of pathogen fungus showing the interest of such materials for the treatment of wastewater.",
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Turki, A, Ibáñez, PF, Ghorbel, A, Kochkar, H, Guillard, C & Berhault, G 2012, Synthesis design of TiO2 nanotubes and nanowires and photocatalytic applications in the degradation of organic pollutants in the presence or not of microorganisms. in Titanium Dioxide Nanomaterials 2012. vol. 1442, pp. 13-18, 2012 MRS Spring Meeting, San Francisco, CA, United States, 9/04/12. https://doi.org/10.1557/opl.2012.848

Synthesis design of TiO2 nanotubes and nanowires and photocatalytic applications in the degradation of organic pollutants in the presence or not of microorganisms. / Turki, Asma; Ibáñez, Pilar Fernández; Ghorbel, Abdelhamid; Kochkar, Hafedh; Guillard, Chantal; Berhault, Gilles.

Titanium Dioxide Nanomaterials 2012. Vol. 1442 2012. p. 13-18.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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T1 - Synthesis design of TiO2 nanotubes and nanowires and photocatalytic applications in the degradation of organic pollutants in the presence or not of microorganisms

AU - Turki, Asma

AU - Ibáñez, Pilar Fernández

AU - Ghorbel, Abdelhamid

AU - Kochkar, Hafedh

AU - Guillard, Chantal

AU - Berhault, Gilles

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N2 - 1 D TiO2 nanomaterials (nanotubes, nanowires) were synthesized through hydrothermal treatment of TiO2 powder (P25) in concentrated alkaline solutions (NaOH for nanotubes, KOH for nanowires) followed by calcination at varying temperatures between 400°C and 700°C Samples were characterized by HRTEM, XRD, Raman spectroscopy, and N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms. High surface area nanotubular TiO2 materials can maintain their 1D morphology up to a temperature of calcination of 400°C while changing their phase from hydrogenotitanate to anatase. The use of KOH leads to a retarded formation of anatase. Photocatalytic results showed that TiO2 anatase nanotubes calcined at 400°C can degrade formic acid with a rate constant four times higher than for P25. A direct correlation between surface area and photocatalytic activity explains the much higher activity of TiO2 anatase nanotubes. On the opposite, for the degradation of phenol, P25 remains more active. In the disinfection of water, contrary to P25, the high surface area of TiO2 nanotubes allows the simultaneous degradation of formic acid and the inactivation of pathogen fungus showing the interest of such materials for the treatment of wastewater.

AB - 1 D TiO2 nanomaterials (nanotubes, nanowires) were synthesized through hydrothermal treatment of TiO2 powder (P25) in concentrated alkaline solutions (NaOH for nanotubes, KOH for nanowires) followed by calcination at varying temperatures between 400°C and 700°C Samples were characterized by HRTEM, XRD, Raman spectroscopy, and N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms. High surface area nanotubular TiO2 materials can maintain their 1D morphology up to a temperature of calcination of 400°C while changing their phase from hydrogenotitanate to anatase. The use of KOH leads to a retarded formation of anatase. Photocatalytic results showed that TiO2 anatase nanotubes calcined at 400°C can degrade formic acid with a rate constant four times higher than for P25. A direct correlation between surface area and photocatalytic activity explains the much higher activity of TiO2 anatase nanotubes. On the opposite, for the degradation of phenol, P25 remains more active. In the disinfection of water, contrary to P25, the high surface area of TiO2 nanotubes allows the simultaneous degradation of formic acid and the inactivation of pathogen fungus showing the interest of such materials for the treatment of wastewater.

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M3 - Conference contribution

SN - 9781627482455

VL - 1442

SP - 13

EP - 18

BT - Titanium Dioxide Nanomaterials 2012

ER -