Surgeon opinion on new technologies in orthopaedic surgery

S Davey, M Craven, BJ Meenan, J Martin, J Crowe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Technological advances such as computer navigation systems and robotics, includingsupport systems for minimally invasive surgery, have the potential to revolutionise howorthopaedic surgery is carried out. However uptake has so far been limited. Increasedawareness of user requirements in adoption decision-making will be useful. In this regard,the opinion of the individual surgeon regarding his or her willingness to engage in a noveltechnology has rarely been garnished. This paper analyses the opinions of orthopaedicconsultants from the UK and USA about technological advances in hip and kneearthroplasty, factors contributing to successful short-term and long-term surgicaloutcome, and patient preferences. The survey, using a web-based questionnaire, wascarried out in 2006–2007 and followed up in 2010. The results of this research give agreater insight into why surgical technologies that have the potential to improve patientoutcome are not more speedily adopted in the health service.
LanguageEnglish
Pages139-148
JournalJournal of Medical Engineering & Technology
Volume35
Issue number3-4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2011

Fingerprint

Orthopedics
Surgery
Navigation systems
Robotics
Decision making
Health

Cite this

Davey, S ; Craven, M ; Meenan, BJ ; Martin, J ; Crowe, J. / Surgeon opinion on new technologies in orthopaedic surgery. In: Journal of Medical Engineering & Technology. 2011 ; Vol. 35, No. 3-4. pp. 139-148.
@article{a3555aac1b524dc1bb359b5a295bde31,
title = "Surgeon opinion on new technologies in orthopaedic surgery",
abstract = "Technological advances such as computer navigation systems and robotics, includingsupport systems for minimally invasive surgery, have the potential to revolutionise howorthopaedic surgery is carried out. However uptake has so far been limited. Increasedawareness of user requirements in adoption decision-making will be useful. In this regard,the opinion of the individual surgeon regarding his or her willingness to engage in a noveltechnology has rarely been garnished. This paper analyses the opinions of orthopaedicconsultants from the UK and USA about technological advances in hip and kneearthroplasty, factors contributing to successful short-term and long-term surgicaloutcome, and patient preferences. The survey, using a web-based questionnaire, wascarried out in 2006–2007 and followed up in 2010. The results of this research give agreater insight into why surgical technologies that have the potential to improve patientoutcome are not more speedily adopted in the health service.",
author = "S Davey and M Craven and BJ Meenan and J Martin and J Crowe",
year = "2011",
month = "5",
doi = "10.3109/03091902.2011.554596",
language = "English",
volume = "35",
pages = "139--148",
journal = "Journal of Medical Engineering and Technology",
issn = "0309-1902",
number = "3-4",

}

Surgeon opinion on new technologies in orthopaedic surgery. / Davey, S; Craven, M; Meenan, BJ; Martin, J; Crowe, J.

In: Journal of Medical Engineering & Technology, Vol. 35, No. 3-4, 05.2011, p. 139-148.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Surgeon opinion on new technologies in orthopaedic surgery

AU - Davey, S

AU - Craven, M

AU - Meenan, BJ

AU - Martin, J

AU - Crowe, J

PY - 2011/5

Y1 - 2011/5

N2 - Technological advances such as computer navigation systems and robotics, includingsupport systems for minimally invasive surgery, have the potential to revolutionise howorthopaedic surgery is carried out. However uptake has so far been limited. Increasedawareness of user requirements in adoption decision-making will be useful. In this regard,the opinion of the individual surgeon regarding his or her willingness to engage in a noveltechnology has rarely been garnished. This paper analyses the opinions of orthopaedicconsultants from the UK and USA about technological advances in hip and kneearthroplasty, factors contributing to successful short-term and long-term surgicaloutcome, and patient preferences. The survey, using a web-based questionnaire, wascarried out in 2006–2007 and followed up in 2010. The results of this research give agreater insight into why surgical technologies that have the potential to improve patientoutcome are not more speedily adopted in the health service.

AB - Technological advances such as computer navigation systems and robotics, includingsupport systems for minimally invasive surgery, have the potential to revolutionise howorthopaedic surgery is carried out. However uptake has so far been limited. Increasedawareness of user requirements in adoption decision-making will be useful. In this regard,the opinion of the individual surgeon regarding his or her willingness to engage in a noveltechnology has rarely been garnished. This paper analyses the opinions of orthopaedicconsultants from the UK and USA about technological advances in hip and kneearthroplasty, factors contributing to successful short-term and long-term surgicaloutcome, and patient preferences. The survey, using a web-based questionnaire, wascarried out in 2006–2007 and followed up in 2010. The results of this research give agreater insight into why surgical technologies that have the potential to improve patientoutcome are not more speedily adopted in the health service.

U2 - 10.3109/03091902.2011.554596

DO - 10.3109/03091902.2011.554596

M3 - Article

VL - 35

SP - 139

EP - 148

JO - Journal of Medical Engineering and Technology

T2 - Journal of Medical Engineering and Technology

JF - Journal of Medical Engineering and Technology

SN - 0309-1902

IS - 3-4

ER -