Supporting community cohesion through ICT: The epartners programmein Northern Ireland

Roger Austin, Bill Hunter, Lynsey Hollywood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In the face of deep-rooted sectarian sentiment in Northern Ireland and the pervasive nature of ‘‘separateness’’ between the Protestant and Catholic communities, this article examines school projects designed to promote community cohesion and assesses the role that information and communications technology(ICT) can play to encourage collaboration within a social psychology framework. Further, we report on exploratory research conducted through the evaluation of a pilot program that involved university student tutors working with teachers and pupils in a range of schools. Our findings to date suggest that a strong focus on collaborative work in non-contentious areas of the curriculum has a strong chance of securing support from key stakeholders, including teachers, the main churches and other stakeholders in the educational system.
LanguageEnglish
Pages508-514
JournalComputers in Human Behaviour
Volume52
Early online date11 Mar 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2015

Fingerprint

group cohesion
communication technology
information technology
stakeholder
social psychology
teacher
tutor
educational system
school
community
pupil
church
curriculum
university
evaluation
student

Keywords

  • community cohesion
  • shared education and ICT
  • blended learning
  • intercultural education

Cite this

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title = "Supporting community cohesion through ICT: The epartners programmein Northern Ireland",
abstract = "In the face of deep-rooted sectarian sentiment in Northern Ireland and the pervasive nature of ‘‘separateness’’ between the Protestant and Catholic communities, this article examines school projects designed to promote community cohesion and assesses the role that information and communications technology(ICT) can play to encourage collaboration within a social psychology framework. Further, we report on exploratory research conducted through the evaluation of a pilot program that involved university student tutors working with teachers and pupils in a range of schools. Our findings to date suggest that a strong focus on collaborative work in non-contentious areas of the curriculum has a strong chance of securing support from key stakeholders, including teachers, the main churches and other stakeholders in the educational system.",
keywords = "community cohesion, shared education and ICT, blended learning, intercultural education",
author = "Roger Austin and Bill Hunter and Lynsey Hollywood",
note = "Reference text: Akenson, D. H. (1970). The Irish education experiment: The National System of Education in Ireland in the nineteenth century. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul. Allport, G. W. (1954). The nature of prejudice. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley. Austin, R., & Anderson, J. (2008). E-schooling: Global messages from a small Island. London and New York: Routledge. Austin, R., & Hunter, W. (2012). Whatever you say, say nothing: Student perceptions of online learning and community in Northern Ireland. Irish Educational Studies, 31(4), 451–465. Austin, R., & Hunter, W. (2013). Online learning and community cohesion: Linking schools. New York and London: Routledge. Barton, K., & McCully, A. (2012). Trying to ‘‘See things differently:’’ Northern Ireland students’ struggle to understand alternative historical perspectives. Theory & Research in Social Education, 40(4), 371–408. Connolly, P., Purvis, D. & O’Grady, P. J. (2013) ‘‘Advancing Shared Education’’ Ministerial Advisory Group <http://www.deni.gov.uk/shared-educationministerial- advisory-group.htm> Accessed: 5 December, 2014. Council for the Curriculum, Examinations and Assessment. (2014). Northern Ireland curriculum. Belfast. <http://www.nicurriculum.org.uk/> Accessed 13 June, 2014. Department of Education, Northern Ireland (1989). Education Reform Order.<http:// www.legislation.gov.uk/nisi/1989/2406/contents/made> Accessed 13 June, 2014. Department of Education (2013a). Area Learning Communities. <http://www.deni. gov.uk/news/news-de-050813-area-learning-communities.htm> Accessed 13 June, 2014. Department of Education (2013b), School Omnibus Survey – shared education. <http://www.deni.gov.uk/shared_education.pdf> Accessed 13 June, 2014. Duffy, G., & Gallagher, T. (2014). Sustaining school partnerships; the context of cross-sectoral collaboration between schools in a separate education system in Northern Ireland. Review of Education, 2(2), 189–210. Eyben, K., Morrow, D., Wilson, D. & Robinson, B. (2002). The equity, diversity and interdependence framework: A framework for organisational learning and development. University of Ulster. Hargie, O., Dickson, D., & Rainey, S. (2002). Religious difference, inter-group trust, attraction and disclosure amongst young people in Northern Ireland. International Journal of Adolescence and Youth (10), 213–235. Hasler, B. S, & Amichai-Hamburger, Y. (2013). Online intergroup contact. In Y. Amichai-Hamburger (Ed.), The social net. Human behavior in cyberspace (2nd ed. New York: Oxford University Press. Hughes, J. (2014). Contact and context: sharing education and building relationships in a divided society. Research papers in education, 193–210. Lecky, W. E. H, (1892). A history of Ireland in the eighteenth century. Online edition. <http://books.google.ca/books?vid=OCLC24603276&id=mbsBAAAA MAAJ&printsec=toc&dq=lecky+history+england&sig=iU5UPyNpROTDXXJlFV9 ucBDFVcE&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=lecky{\%}20history{\%}20england&f=false> Accessed 13 June, 2014. Niens, U., Kerr, K., & Connolly, P. (2013). Evaluation of the effectiveness of the ‘‘promoting reconciliation through a shared curriculum experience’’ programme. Belfast: Centre for Effective Education, Queen’s University Belfast. Northern Ireland Council for Integrated Education, Annual Report. (2012/2013). <http://www.nicie.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/NICIE-Annual-Report-2012- 13-web.pdf> Accessed 13 June, 2014. O’Connor, U., Beattie, K., & Niens, U. (2008). An evaluation of the introduction of local and global citizenship to the Northern Ireland curriculum. Council for the curriculum, examinations and assessment. UNESCO Centre, University of Ulster. Rickard, A., Austin, R., Smyth, J., & Grace, A. (2014). Assessing the impact of ICT enriched intercultural work on pupil attitudes: Evidence from the Dissolving Boundaries Program. International Journal of Information Communication and Technology Education, 3(10), 1–18. Roulston, S., & Young, O. (2013). GPS tracking of some Northern Ireland students: patterns of shared and separated space: Divided we stand? International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education, 22(3), 241–258. Sanner, S., & Dies, M. H. (2009). How can interdisciplinary collaboration between schools promote culturally diverse students’ success? Academy of Educational Leadership Journal (13), 19–34. Worden, E. A. (2014). National identity and educational reform. New York and London: Routledge.",
year = "2015",
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}

Supporting community cohesion through ICT: The epartners programmein Northern Ireland. / Austin, Roger; Hunter, Bill; Hollywood, Lynsey.

In: Computers in Human Behaviour, Vol. 52, 11.2015, p. 508-514.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Supporting community cohesion through ICT: The epartners programmein Northern Ireland

AU - Austin, Roger

AU - Hunter, Bill

AU - Hollywood, Lynsey

N1 - Reference text: Akenson, D. H. (1970). The Irish education experiment: The National System of Education in Ireland in the nineteenth century. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul. Allport, G. W. (1954). The nature of prejudice. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley. Austin, R., & Anderson, J. (2008). E-schooling: Global messages from a small Island. London and New York: Routledge. Austin, R., & Hunter, W. (2012). Whatever you say, say nothing: Student perceptions of online learning and community in Northern Ireland. Irish Educational Studies, 31(4), 451–465. Austin, R., & Hunter, W. (2013). Online learning and community cohesion: Linking schools. New York and London: Routledge. Barton, K., & McCully, A. (2012). Trying to ‘‘See things differently:’’ Northern Ireland students’ struggle to understand alternative historical perspectives. Theory & Research in Social Education, 40(4), 371–408. Connolly, P., Purvis, D. & O’Grady, P. J. (2013) ‘‘Advancing Shared Education’’ Ministerial Advisory Group <http://www.deni.gov.uk/shared-educationministerial- advisory-group.htm> Accessed: 5 December, 2014. Council for the Curriculum, Examinations and Assessment. (2014). Northern Ireland curriculum. Belfast. <http://www.nicurriculum.org.uk/> Accessed 13 June, 2014. Department of Education, Northern Ireland (1989). Education Reform Order.<http:// www.legislation.gov.uk/nisi/1989/2406/contents/made> Accessed 13 June, 2014. Department of Education (2013a). Area Learning Communities. <http://www.deni. gov.uk/news/news-de-050813-area-learning-communities.htm> Accessed 13 June, 2014. Department of Education (2013b), School Omnibus Survey – shared education. <http://www.deni.gov.uk/shared_education.pdf> Accessed 13 June, 2014. Duffy, G., & Gallagher, T. (2014). Sustaining school partnerships; the context of cross-sectoral collaboration between schools in a separate education system in Northern Ireland. Review of Education, 2(2), 189–210. Eyben, K., Morrow, D., Wilson, D. & Robinson, B. (2002). The equity, diversity and interdependence framework: A framework for organisational learning and development. University of Ulster. Hargie, O., Dickson, D., & Rainey, S. (2002). Religious difference, inter-group trust, attraction and disclosure amongst young people in Northern Ireland. International Journal of Adolescence and Youth (10), 213–235. Hasler, B. S, & Amichai-Hamburger, Y. (2013). Online intergroup contact. In Y. Amichai-Hamburger (Ed.), The social net. Human behavior in cyberspace (2nd ed. New York: Oxford University Press. Hughes, J. (2014). Contact and context: sharing education and building relationships in a divided society. Research papers in education, 193–210. Lecky, W. E. H, (1892). A history of Ireland in the eighteenth century. Online edition. <http://books.google.ca/books?vid=OCLC24603276&id=mbsBAAAA MAAJ&printsec=toc&dq=lecky+history+england&sig=iU5UPyNpROTDXXJlFV9 ucBDFVcE&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=lecky%20history%20england&f=false> Accessed 13 June, 2014. Niens, U., Kerr, K., & Connolly, P. (2013). Evaluation of the effectiveness of the ‘‘promoting reconciliation through a shared curriculum experience’’ programme. Belfast: Centre for Effective Education, Queen’s University Belfast. Northern Ireland Council for Integrated Education, Annual Report. (2012/2013). <http://www.nicie.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/NICIE-Annual-Report-2012- 13-web.pdf> Accessed 13 June, 2014. O’Connor, U., Beattie, K., & Niens, U. (2008). An evaluation of the introduction of local and global citizenship to the Northern Ireland curriculum. Council for the curriculum, examinations and assessment. UNESCO Centre, University of Ulster. Rickard, A., Austin, R., Smyth, J., & Grace, A. (2014). Assessing the impact of ICT enriched intercultural work on pupil attitudes: Evidence from the Dissolving Boundaries Program. International Journal of Information Communication and Technology Education, 3(10), 1–18. Roulston, S., & Young, O. (2013). GPS tracking of some Northern Ireland students: patterns of shared and separated space: Divided we stand? International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education, 22(3), 241–258. Sanner, S., & Dies, M. H. (2009). How can interdisciplinary collaboration between schools promote culturally diverse students’ success? Academy of Educational Leadership Journal (13), 19–34. Worden, E. A. (2014). National identity and educational reform. New York and London: Routledge.

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T2 - Computers in Human Behavior

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