Stimulus-responsive liquids for encapsulation storage and controlled release of drugs from nano-shell capsules

Ming Wei Chang, Eleanor Stride, Mohan Edirisinghe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Drug-delivery systems with a unique capability to respond to a given stimulus can improve therapeutic efficacy. However, development of such systems is currently heavily reliant on responsive polymeric materials and pursuing this singular strategy limits the potential for clinical translation. In this report, with a model system used for drug-release studies, we demonstrate a new strategy: how a temperature-responsive non-toxic, volatile liquid can be encapsulated and stored under ambient conditions and subsequently programmed for controlled drug release without relying on a smart polymer. When the stimulus temperature is reached, controlled encapsulation of different amounts of dye in the capsules is achieved and facilitates subsequent sustained release. With different ratios of the liquid (perfluorohexane): dye in the capsules, enhanced controlled release with real-time response is provided. Hence, our findings offer great potential for drug-delivery applications and provide new generic insights into the development of stimuli drug-release systems.

LanguageEnglish
Pages451-456
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of The Royal Society Interface
Volume8
Issue number56
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 6 Mar 2011

Fingerprint

Encapsulation
Capsules
Dyes
Liquids
Polymers
Coloring Agents
Drug delivery
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Temperature
Drug Delivery Systems
Drug Liberation
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Controlled release
  • Hollow capsules
  • Stimuli-responsive drug delivery

Cite this

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Stimulus-responsive liquids for encapsulation storage and controlled release of drugs from nano-shell capsules. / Chang, Ming Wei; Stride, Eleanor; Edirisinghe, Mohan.

Vol. 8, No. 56, 06.03.2011, p. 451-456.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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