Sputnik

Research output: Non-textual formArtefact

Abstract

This work examines events as landmarks. It is an extension and development of research examining the politics of place. Related works include ‘CROW’ (collaboration with Mike Hogg www.crowwalks.blogspot.co.uk and ‘Spike in the Data’ (http://www.aislingobeirn.com/spikedata.htm)Research involved exploring the value of vernacular, second-hand information in the form of collected anecdotes, hand-made maps, nicknames etc. I questioned the reliability of information and the creative potential of differing accounts. This led me to make and butt together landmark objects and events from second hand information in anti-monumental materials such as cardboard. ‘Sputnik’, named after the first man-made satellite put into orbit by the Soviets, is made from second-hand information (a photograph) and card. A photograph of a map-like structure, bearing a startling resemblance to an aerial view of Long Kesh (former prison on Belfast’s outskirts, notable for the 1981 Hunger Strikes), was used for the animated component. This psycho-geographic landscape was assembled by political prisoners from objects they and I made during my residency in the prison (on invitation from Prison Arts Foundation). They arrived at this configuration without my input. One can only speculate about the configuration’s cartographic meaning.The animation included audio signal from Sputnik as recorded in Washington DC in 1957. One can only speculate about the reaction on first hearing that signal.The work investigates the relationship between events and their respective “political spaces” by setting up cartographic and historical tensions. This research was deemed relevant to Northern Irish art history, hence Sputnik’s commissioning by curator (Turner Prize-shortlisted, former IMMA-, ICA, Orchard Gallery-director) Declan McGonagle for ’A Shout in the Street’ in the Collective Histories of Northern Irish Art series. The work’s status was underlined by its selection for the travelling exhibition ’'Archiving Place and Time’, Manchester Metropolitan University, 2009, and Millennium Court Arts Centre Portadown 2009.

Fingerprint

correctional institution
art
event
political prisoner
art history
outskirts
hunger
strike
director
politics
history
Values
time

Keywords

  • art science sculpture

Cite this

O'Beirn, A. (Author). (2008). Sputnik. Artefact, Belfast: . Retrieved from http://www.aislingobeirn.com/sputnik.htm
@misc{639cc08ed5c9490c945cafd706d1381a,
title = "Sputnik",
abstract = "This work examines events as landmarks. It is an extension and development of research examining the politics of place. Related works include ‘CROW’ (collaboration with Mike Hogg www.crowwalks.blogspot.co.uk and ‘Spike in the Data’ (http://www.aislingobeirn.com/spikedata.htm)Research involved exploring the value of vernacular, second-hand information in the form of collected anecdotes, hand-made maps, nicknames etc. I questioned the reliability of information and the creative potential of differing accounts. This led me to make and butt together landmark objects and events from second hand information in anti-monumental materials such as cardboard. ‘Sputnik’, named after the first man-made satellite put into orbit by the Soviets, is made from second-hand information (a photograph) and card. A photograph of a map-like structure, bearing a startling resemblance to an aerial view of Long Kesh (former prison on Belfast’s outskirts, notable for the 1981 Hunger Strikes), was used for the animated component. This psycho-geographic landscape was assembled by political prisoners from objects they and I made during my residency in the prison (on invitation from Prison Arts Foundation). They arrived at this configuration without my input. One can only speculate about the configuration’s cartographic meaning.The animation included audio signal from Sputnik as recorded in Washington DC in 1957. One can only speculate about the reaction on first hearing that signal.The work investigates the relationship between events and their respective “political spaces” by setting up cartographic and historical tensions. This research was deemed relevant to Northern Irish art history, hence Sputnik’s commissioning by curator (Turner Prize-shortlisted, former IMMA-, ICA, Orchard Gallery-director) Declan McGonagle for ’A Shout in the Street’ in the Collective Histories of Northern Irish Art series. The work’s status was underlined by its selection for the travelling exhibition ’'Archiving Place and Time’, Manchester Metropolitan University, 2009, and Millennium Court Arts Centre Portadown 2009.",
keywords = "art science sculpture",
author = "Aisling O'Beirn",
note = "Location: Commissioned for A Shout in the Street Golden Thread Gallery, Belfast, curated by Declan. McGonagle September 2008, also shown at: ‘Archiving Place and Time: Contemporary Art Practice in Northern Ireland since the Belfast Agreement', Manchester Metropolitan University, 2009 , Millennium Court Arts Centre, 2009, curated by Fionna Barber and Megan Johnston. Reference text: Publications ‘A Shout in the Street, Collective Histories of Northern Irish Art’ D. McGonagle, Golden Thread Gallery, Catalogue Belfast 2008ISBN 978-0-9557469-2-5 ‘A Shout in the Street, Reflections’, D. McGonagle, in Wasafiri, Ireland Texts and Contexts Vol 25, no 2, Summer Routledge, London 2010 pp. 46 ‘A Shout in the Street,’ review, D. Jewesbury, CIRCA, no 126, winter 2008 Event (exhibition): 'Archiving Place and Time: Contemporary Art Practice in Northern Ireland since the Belfast Agreement'. Exhibition Press Release It is now just over a decade since the historic Belfast / Good Friday Agreement was signed, bringing an end to some thirty years of bitter conflict in Northern Ireland. The 1998 Agreement has brought significant changes not just for people's everyday lives but their awareness of both the preceding history and their hopes for the future. It also codifies parity of esteem, particularly in relation to culture and language. The engagement of visual culture and art practice in Northern Ireland with the socio-political and economic development of a post-conflict society is at the forefront of the concerns of this exhibition. This includes engagements with history, memory and archival material, in addition to issues around urban regeneration in a post-industrial city or the reconstruction of post-conflict identity. Artists Willie Doherty, Paul Seawright, Rita Duffy, Sandra Johnston, Conor McGrady, Mary McIntyre, Aisling O'Beirn, Philip Napier and Conor McFeely Archiving Place & Time Contemporary Art Practice in Northern Ireland since the Belfast Agreement 16.11.09 - 11.12.09 Open Monday - Friday 10am - 4pm It is now just over a decade since the historic Belfast / Good Friday Agreement was signed, bringing an end to some thirty years of bitter conflict in Northern Ireland. The 1998 Agreement has brought significant changes not just for people's everyday lives but their awareness of both the preceding history and their hopes for the future. It also codifies parity of esteem, particularly in relation to culture and language. The engagement of visual culture and art practice in Northern Ireland with the socio-political and economic development of a post-conflict society is at the forefront of the concerns of this exhibition. This includes engagements with history, memory and archival material, in addition to issues around urban regeneration in a post-industrial city or the reconstruction of post-conflict identity. The Holden Gallery / Manchester Metropolitan University 16-11-2009 / 11-12-2009 Event (exhibition): 'Archiving Place and Time: Contemporary Art Practice in Northern Ireland since the Belfast Agreement'. Exhibition Press Release It is now just over a decade since the historic Belfast / Good Friday Agreement was signed, bringing an end to some thirty years of bitter conflict in Northern Ireland. The 1998 Agreement has brought significant changes not just for people's everyday lives but their awareness of both the preceding history and their hopes for the future. It also codifies parity of esteem, particularly in relation to culture and language. The engagement of visual culture and art practice in Northern Ireland with the socio-political and economic development of a post-conflict society is at the forefront of the concerns of this exhibition. This includes engagements with history, memory and archival material, in addition to issues around urban regeneration in a post-industrial city or the reconstruction of post-conflict identity. Curated by Fionna Barber and Megan Johnston Artists Willie Doherty, Paul Seawright, Rita Duffy, Sandra Johnston, Conor McGrady, Mary McIntyre, Aisling O'Beirn, Philip Napier and Conor McFeely Archiving Place & Time Contemporary Art Practice in Northern Ireland since the Belfast Agreement It is now just over a decade since the historic Belfast / Good Friday Agreement was signed, bringing an end to some thirty years of bitter conflict in Northern Ireland. The 1998 Agreement has brought significant changes not just for people's everyday lives but their awareness of both the preceding history and their hopes for the future. It also codifies parity of esteem, particularly in relation to culture and language. The engagement of visual culture and art practice in Northern Ireland with the socio-political and economic development of a post-conflict society is at the forefront of the concerns of this exhibition. This includes engagements with history, memory and archival material, in addition to issues around urban regeneration in a post-industrial city or the reconstruction of post-conflict identity. Show reviewed by Bree Hocking for Culture Northern Ireland Millenium Court Arts Centre / Portadown 01-01-2010 / 29-05-2010 Outputmediatype: Card Model and animation",
year = "2008",
month = "11",
language = "English",

}

O'Beirn, A, Sputnik, 2008, Artefact, Belfast.
Sputnik. O'Beirn, Aisling (Author). 2008. Belfast : Event: ‘A Shout in the Street, Collective Histories of Northern Irish Art’, Golden Thread Gallery / Belfast.

Research output: Non-textual formArtefact

TY - ADVS

T1 - Sputnik

AU - O'Beirn, Aisling

N1 - Location: Commissioned for A Shout in the Street Golden Thread Gallery, Belfast, curated by Declan. McGonagle September 2008, also shown at: ‘Archiving Place and Time: Contemporary Art Practice in Northern Ireland since the Belfast Agreement', Manchester Metropolitan University, 2009 , Millennium Court Arts Centre, 2009, curated by Fionna Barber and Megan Johnston. Reference text: Publications ‘A Shout in the Street, Collective Histories of Northern Irish Art’ D. McGonagle, Golden Thread Gallery, Catalogue Belfast 2008ISBN 978-0-9557469-2-5 ‘A Shout in the Street, Reflections’, D. McGonagle, in Wasafiri, Ireland Texts and Contexts Vol 25, no 2, Summer Routledge, London 2010 pp. 46 ‘A Shout in the Street,’ review, D. Jewesbury, CIRCA, no 126, winter 2008 Event (exhibition): 'Archiving Place and Time: Contemporary Art Practice in Northern Ireland since the Belfast Agreement'. Exhibition Press Release It is now just over a decade since the historic Belfast / Good Friday Agreement was signed, bringing an end to some thirty years of bitter conflict in Northern Ireland. The 1998 Agreement has brought significant changes not just for people's everyday lives but their awareness of both the preceding history and their hopes for the future. It also codifies parity of esteem, particularly in relation to culture and language. The engagement of visual culture and art practice in Northern Ireland with the socio-political and economic development of a post-conflict society is at the forefront of the concerns of this exhibition. This includes engagements with history, memory and archival material, in addition to issues around urban regeneration in a post-industrial city or the reconstruction of post-conflict identity. Artists Willie Doherty, Paul Seawright, Rita Duffy, Sandra Johnston, Conor McGrady, Mary McIntyre, Aisling O'Beirn, Philip Napier and Conor McFeely Archiving Place & Time Contemporary Art Practice in Northern Ireland since the Belfast Agreement 16.11.09 - 11.12.09 Open Monday - Friday 10am - 4pm It is now just over a decade since the historic Belfast / Good Friday Agreement was signed, bringing an end to some thirty years of bitter conflict in Northern Ireland. The 1998 Agreement has brought significant changes not just for people's everyday lives but their awareness of both the preceding history and their hopes for the future. It also codifies parity of esteem, particularly in relation to culture and language. The engagement of visual culture and art practice in Northern Ireland with the socio-political and economic development of a post-conflict society is at the forefront of the concerns of this exhibition. This includes engagements with history, memory and archival material, in addition to issues around urban regeneration in a post-industrial city or the reconstruction of post-conflict identity. The Holden Gallery / Manchester Metropolitan University 16-11-2009 / 11-12-2009 Event (exhibition): 'Archiving Place and Time: Contemporary Art Practice in Northern Ireland since the Belfast Agreement'. Exhibition Press Release It is now just over a decade since the historic Belfast / Good Friday Agreement was signed, bringing an end to some thirty years of bitter conflict in Northern Ireland. The 1998 Agreement has brought significant changes not just for people's everyday lives but their awareness of both the preceding history and their hopes for the future. It also codifies parity of esteem, particularly in relation to culture and language. The engagement of visual culture and art practice in Northern Ireland with the socio-political and economic development of a post-conflict society is at the forefront of the concerns of this exhibition. This includes engagements with history, memory and archival material, in addition to issues around urban regeneration in a post-industrial city or the reconstruction of post-conflict identity. Curated by Fionna Barber and Megan Johnston Artists Willie Doherty, Paul Seawright, Rita Duffy, Sandra Johnston, Conor McGrady, Mary McIntyre, Aisling O'Beirn, Philip Napier and Conor McFeely Archiving Place & Time Contemporary Art Practice in Northern Ireland since the Belfast Agreement It is now just over a decade since the historic Belfast / Good Friday Agreement was signed, bringing an end to some thirty years of bitter conflict in Northern Ireland. The 1998 Agreement has brought significant changes not just for people's everyday lives but their awareness of both the preceding history and their hopes for the future. It also codifies parity of esteem, particularly in relation to culture and language. The engagement of visual culture and art practice in Northern Ireland with the socio-political and economic development of a post-conflict society is at the forefront of the concerns of this exhibition. This includes engagements with history, memory and archival material, in addition to issues around urban regeneration in a post-industrial city or the reconstruction of post-conflict identity. Show reviewed by Bree Hocking for Culture Northern Ireland Millenium Court Arts Centre / Portadown 01-01-2010 / 29-05-2010 Outputmediatype: Card Model and animation

PY - 2008/11

Y1 - 2008/11

N2 - This work examines events as landmarks. It is an extension and development of research examining the politics of place. Related works include ‘CROW’ (collaboration with Mike Hogg www.crowwalks.blogspot.co.uk and ‘Spike in the Data’ (http://www.aislingobeirn.com/spikedata.htm)Research involved exploring the value of vernacular, second-hand information in the form of collected anecdotes, hand-made maps, nicknames etc. I questioned the reliability of information and the creative potential of differing accounts. This led me to make and butt together landmark objects and events from second hand information in anti-monumental materials such as cardboard. ‘Sputnik’, named after the first man-made satellite put into orbit by the Soviets, is made from second-hand information (a photograph) and card. A photograph of a map-like structure, bearing a startling resemblance to an aerial view of Long Kesh (former prison on Belfast’s outskirts, notable for the 1981 Hunger Strikes), was used for the animated component. This psycho-geographic landscape was assembled by political prisoners from objects they and I made during my residency in the prison (on invitation from Prison Arts Foundation). They arrived at this configuration without my input. One can only speculate about the configuration’s cartographic meaning.The animation included audio signal from Sputnik as recorded in Washington DC in 1957. One can only speculate about the reaction on first hearing that signal.The work investigates the relationship between events and their respective “political spaces” by setting up cartographic and historical tensions. This research was deemed relevant to Northern Irish art history, hence Sputnik’s commissioning by curator (Turner Prize-shortlisted, former IMMA-, ICA, Orchard Gallery-director) Declan McGonagle for ’A Shout in the Street’ in the Collective Histories of Northern Irish Art series. The work’s status was underlined by its selection for the travelling exhibition ’'Archiving Place and Time’, Manchester Metropolitan University, 2009, and Millennium Court Arts Centre Portadown 2009.

AB - This work examines events as landmarks. It is an extension and development of research examining the politics of place. Related works include ‘CROW’ (collaboration with Mike Hogg www.crowwalks.blogspot.co.uk and ‘Spike in the Data’ (http://www.aislingobeirn.com/spikedata.htm)Research involved exploring the value of vernacular, second-hand information in the form of collected anecdotes, hand-made maps, nicknames etc. I questioned the reliability of information and the creative potential of differing accounts. This led me to make and butt together landmark objects and events from second hand information in anti-monumental materials such as cardboard. ‘Sputnik’, named after the first man-made satellite put into orbit by the Soviets, is made from second-hand information (a photograph) and card. A photograph of a map-like structure, bearing a startling resemblance to an aerial view of Long Kesh (former prison on Belfast’s outskirts, notable for the 1981 Hunger Strikes), was used for the animated component. This psycho-geographic landscape was assembled by political prisoners from objects they and I made during my residency in the prison (on invitation from Prison Arts Foundation). They arrived at this configuration without my input. One can only speculate about the configuration’s cartographic meaning.The animation included audio signal from Sputnik as recorded in Washington DC in 1957. One can only speculate about the reaction on first hearing that signal.The work investigates the relationship between events and their respective “political spaces” by setting up cartographic and historical tensions. This research was deemed relevant to Northern Irish art history, hence Sputnik’s commissioning by curator (Turner Prize-shortlisted, former IMMA-, ICA, Orchard Gallery-director) Declan McGonagle for ’A Shout in the Street’ in the Collective Histories of Northern Irish Art series. The work’s status was underlined by its selection for the travelling exhibition ’'Archiving Place and Time’, Manchester Metropolitan University, 2009, and Millennium Court Arts Centre Portadown 2009.

KW - art science sculpture

UR - http://www.goldenthreadgallery.co.uk/goldenthreadgalleryexhibitions2008historiesashoutinthesttreet.htm

UR - http://www.holdengallery.mmu.ac.uk/archivingplaceandtime.php

UR - http://www.millenniumcourt.org

UR - http://www.facebook.com/Millennium.Court.Arts.Centre

UR - http://www.culturenorthernireland.org/article/3230/archiving-place-time

UR - http://www.artrabbit.com/uk/events/event/18397/archiving_place_time

M3 - Artefact

CY - Belfast

ER -

O'Beirn A (Author). Sputnik Belfast: . 2008.