Sport and the Sustainable Development Goals: Where is the policy coherence?

Iain Lindsey, Paul Darby

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article addresses the urgent need for critical analysis of the relationships between sportand the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) enshrined in the United Nations’ globaldevelopment framework, the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Importantly, therehas yet to be any substantial academic exploration of the implications of the positionaccorded to sport as ‘an important enabler’ of the aims of 2030 Agenda and its broad set ofSDGs. In beginning to address this gap, we draw on the concept of policy coherence for tworeasons. Firstly, the designation of a specific SDG Target for policy coherence is recognitionof its centrality in working towards SDGs that are considered as ‘integrated and indivisible’.Secondly, the concept of policy coherence is centred on a dualism that enables holisticexamination of both synergies through which the contribution of sport to the SDGs can beenhanced as well as incoherencies by which sport may detract from such outcomes. Ouranalysis progresses through three examples that focus on the common orientation of the Sportfor Development and Peace ‘movement’ towards education-orientated objectives alignedwith SDG 4; potential synergies between sport participation policies and the SDG 3 Targetfor reducing non-communicable diseases; and practices within professional football inrelation to several migration-related SDG Targets. These examples show the relevance of theSDGs across diverse sectors of the sport industry and illustrate complexities within andacross countries that make pursuit of comprehensive policy coherence infeasible.Nevertheless, our analyses lead us to encourage both policy makers and researchers tocontinue to utilise the concept of policy coherence as a valuable lens to identify and considerfactors that may enable and constrain various potential contributions of sport to a range ofSDGs.
LanguageEnglish
Pages1-20
Number of pages20
JournalInternational Review for the Sociology of Sport
Volume1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 22 Jan 2018

Fingerprint

Sports
sustainable development
synergy
peace movement
coherence
UNO
migration
Disease
participation
industry
education

Keywords

  • 2030 Agenda
  • education
  • health
  • migration
  • United Nations

Cite this

@article{6a890bda8fb2458c902cbc56ae2a8965,
title = "Sport and the Sustainable Development Goals: Where is the policy coherence?",
abstract = "This article addresses the urgent need for critical analysis of the relationships between sportand the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) enshrined in the United Nations’ globaldevelopment framework, the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Importantly, therehas yet to be any substantial academic exploration of the implications of the positionaccorded to sport as ‘an important enabler’ of the aims of 2030 Agenda and its broad set ofSDGs. In beginning to address this gap, we draw on the concept of policy coherence for tworeasons. Firstly, the designation of a specific SDG Target for policy coherence is recognitionof its centrality in working towards SDGs that are considered as ‘integrated and indivisible’.Secondly, the concept of policy coherence is centred on a dualism that enables holisticexamination of both synergies through which the contribution of sport to the SDGs can beenhanced as well as incoherencies by which sport may detract from such outcomes. Ouranalysis progresses through three examples that focus on the common orientation of the Sportfor Development and Peace ‘movement’ towards education-orientated objectives alignedwith SDG 4; potential synergies between sport participation policies and the SDG 3 Targetfor reducing non-communicable diseases; and practices within professional football inrelation to several migration-related SDG Targets. These examples show the relevance of theSDGs across diverse sectors of the sport industry and illustrate complexities within andacross countries that make pursuit of comprehensive policy coherence infeasible.Nevertheless, our analyses lead us to encourage both policy makers and researchers tocontinue to utilise the concept of policy coherence as a valuable lens to identify and considerfactors that may enable and constrain various potential contributions of sport to a range ofSDGs.",
keywords = "2030 Agenda, education, health, migration, United Nations",
author = "Iain Lindsey and Paul Darby",
note = "Reference text: Agergaard, A, Ungruhe, C (2016) Ambivalent precarity: Career trajectories and temporalities in highly skilled sports labor migration from West Africa to Northern Europe. Anthropology of Work Review 37(2): 67–78. Google Scholar, Crossref Akindes, G, Kirwan, M (2009) Sport as international aid: Assisting development or promoting under-development in Sub-Saharan Africa? In: Levermore, R, Beacom, A (eds) Sport and International Development. Basingstoke: Macmillan, pp. 215–245. Google Scholar, Crossref Ashoff, G (2005) Enhancing policy coherence for development: Justification, recognition and approaches to achievement. DIE Studies No. 11. Bonn: German Development Institute / Deutsches Institutf{\"u}r Entwicklungspolitik (DIE). Google Scholar Bakewell, O (2011) Migration and development in Sub-Saharan Africa. In: Phillips, N (ed.) Migration in the Global Political Economy. Boulder, CO: Lynne Reiner Publishers, pp. 121–142. Google Scholar Bale, J (2004) Three geographies of Africa footballer migration: Patterns, problems and postcoloniality. In: Armstrong, G, Giulianotti, R (eds) Football in Africa: Conflict, Conciliation and Community. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 229–246. Google Scholar Barry, F, King, M, Matthews, A (2010) Policy coherence for development: Five challenges. Irish Studies in International Affairs 21: 207–223. Google Scholar, Crossref Carter, T (2011) In Foreign Fields: The Politics and Experiences of Transnational Sport Migration. London: Pluto Press. Google Scholar Coalter, F (2010) The politics of sport-for-development: Limited focus programmes and broad gauge problems? International Review for the Sociology of Sport 45(3): 295–314. Google Scholar, Link Coalter, F (2013) Sport for Development: What Game Are We Playing? Abingdon: Routledge. Google Scholar Collins, M, Kay, T (2014) Sport and Social Exclusion. London: Routledge. Google Scholar Darby, P (2012) Gains versus drains: Football academies and the export of highly skilled Ghanaian football labour. The Brown Journal of World Affairs 18(2): 265–277. Google Scholar Darby, P (2013) Moving players, traversing perspectives: Global value chains, global production networks and Ghanaian football labour migration. Geoforum 50: 43–53. Google Scholar, Crossref Darby, P, Akindes, G, Kirwin, M (2007) Football academies and the migration of African football labour to Europe. Journal of Sport and Social Issues 31(2): 143–161. Google Scholar, Link Darby, P, Van der Meij, N (2018) Africa, migration and football. In: Nauright, J, Amara, M (eds) Sport in the African World. New York and London: Routledge. Google Scholar Darnell, S (2012) Sport for Development and Peace: A Critical Sociology. London: Bloomsbury Academic. Google Scholar Darnell, SC, Black, DR (2011) Mainstreaming sport into international development studies. Third World Quarterly 32(3): 367–378. Google Scholar, Crossref Darnell, SC, Giulianotti, R, Howe, PD. (2017) Re-assembling sport for development and peace through actor network theory: Insights from Kingston, Jamaica. Sociology of Sport Journal DOI: 10.1123/ssj.2016-0159 Google Scholar, Crossref Davies, L (2016) A wider role for sport: Community sports hubs and urban regeneration. Sport in Society 19(10): 1537–1555. Google Scholar, Crossref De Haas, H (2010) Migration and development: A theoretical perspective. International Migration Review 44(1): 227–264. Google Scholar, Crossref, Medline Deacon, B (2016) Assessing the SDGs from the point of view of global social governance. Journal of International and Comparative Social Policy 32(2): 116–130. Google Scholar, Crossref Drywood, E (2016) “When we buy a young boy…”: Migrant footballers, children’s rights and the case for EU intervention. In: Iusmen, I, Stalford, H (eds) The EU as a Children’s Rights Actor. Opladen; Berlin; Toronto, ON, Canada: Barbara Budrich, pp. 191–219. Google Scholar Dub{\'e}, L, Addy, N, Blouin, C. (2014) From policy coherence to 21st century convergence: A whole-of-society paradigm of human and economic development. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 1331: 201–215. Google Scholar, Crossref, Medline Esson, J (2015a) Better off at home? Rethinking responses to trafficked West African footballers in Europe. Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies 41(3): 512–530. Google Scholar, Crossref Esson, J (2015b) You have to try your luck: Male Ghanaian youth and the uncertainty of football migration. Environment and Planning A 47(6): 1383–1397. Google Scholar, Link FIFPro (2016) FIFPro Global Employment Report: Working Conditions in Professional Football. Hoofddorp: FIFPro. Google Scholar Giulianotti, R (2011) The sport, development and peace sector: A model of four social policy domains. Journal of Social Policy 40(4): 757–776. Google Scholar, Crossref Green, K (2014) Mission impossible? Reflecting upon the relationship between physical education, youth sport and lifelong participation. Sport, Education and Society 19(4): 357–375. Google Scholar, Crossref Hartmann, D, Kwauk, C (2011) Sport and development: An overview, critique and reconstruction. Journal of Sport and Social Issues 35(3): 284–305. Google Scholar, Link Haudenhuyse, R (2015) Book review of Sport and Social Exclusion (2nd ed.) by Mike Collins and Tess Kay. New York: Routledge, 2014, 320 pp.; ISBN: 978-0-415-56880-7. Social Inclusion 3(3): 153–157. Google Scholar, Crossref Hawkins, E (2016) The Lost Boys: Inside Football’s Slave Trade. London: Bloomsbury. Google Scholar Hayhurst, L (2009) The power to shape policy: Charting sport for development and peace policy discourses. International Journal of Sports Policy and Politics 1(2): 203–227. Google Scholar, Crossref Hayhurst, L (2014) The ‘Girl Effect’ and martial arts: Social entrepreneurship and sport. Gender, Place and Culture 21(3): 297–315. Google Scholar, Crossref Janus, H, Klingebiel, S, Paulo, S (2015) Beyond aid: A conceptual perspective on the transformation of development cooperation. Journal of International Development 27(2): 155–169. Google Scholar, Crossref Jeanes, R, Lindsey, I (2014) Where’s the “Evidence?” reflecting on monitoring and evaluation within sport-for-development. In: Young, K, Okada, C (eds) Sport, Social Development and Peace. Bingley: Emerald, pp. 197–217. Google Scholar, Crossref Kaczynski, AT, Henderson, KA (2007) Environmental correlates of physical activity: A review of evidence about parks and recreation. Leisure Sciences 29(4): 315–354. Google Scholar, Crossref Kay, T (2012) Accounting for legacy: Monitoring and evaluation in sport in development relationships. Sport in Society 15(6): 888–904. Google Scholar, Crossref Kay, T, Dudfield, O (2013) The Commonwealth Guide to Advancing Development through Sport. London: Commonwealth Secretariat. Google Scholar King, M (2016) Broadening the global development framework post 2015: Embracing policy coherence and global public goods. The European Journal of Development Research 28(1): 13–29. Google Scholar, Crossref Knoll, A (2014) Bringing policy coherence for development into the post-2015 agenda – Challenges and prospects. Discussion paper no. 163. Maastricht: ECDPM. Google Scholar Le Blanc, D (2015) Towards integration at last? The sustainable development goals as a network of targets. Sustainable Development 23(3): 176–187. Google Scholar, Crossref Lindsey, I (2017) Governance in sport-for-development: Problems and possibilities of (not) learning from international development. International Review for the Sociology of Sport 52(7): 801–818 Google Scholar, Link Lindsey, I, Kay, T, Jeanes, R. (2017) Localizing Global Sport for Development. Manchester: Manchester University Press. Google Scholar Meneses, JP (2013) Ninos futbolistas. Barcelona: Blackie Books. Google Scholar Nicholson, M, Hoye, R, Houlihan, B (2010) Participation in Sport: International Policy Perspectives. Abingdon: Routledge. Google Scholar Nilsson, M, Zamparutti, T, Petersen, JE. (2012) Understanding policy coherence: Analytical framework and examples of sector–environment policy interactions in the EU. Environmental Policy and Governance 22(6): 395–423. Google Scholar, Crossref Nunes, A, Lee, K, O’Riordan, T (2016) The importance of an integrating framework for achieving the sustainable development goals: The example of health and well-being. BMJ Global Health 1: e000068. DOI: 10.1136/bmjgh-2016-000068. Google Scholar, Crossref, Medline OECD (2016) Better policies for sustainable development 2016: A new framework for policy coherence. Available at: http://www.oecd.org/publications/better-policies-for-sustainable-development-2016-9789264256996-en.htm (accessed 23 March 2017). Google Scholar Pogge, T, Sengupta, M (2016) Assessing the sustainable development goals from a human rights perspective. Journal of International and Comparative Social Policy 32(2): 83–97. Google Scholar, Crossref Poli, R (2006) Africans’ status in the European football players’ labour market. Soccer and Society 7(2–3): 278–291. Google Scholar, Crossref Poli, R, Ravanel, L, Besson, R (2016a) Exporting countries in world football. CIES Football Observatory Monthly Report, International Centre for Sports Studies, 8: 1–8. Google Scholar Poli, R, Ravanel, L, Besson, R (2016b) The international mobility of minors in football. CIES Football Observatory Monthly Report, International Centre for Sports Studies, 20: 1–5. Google Scholar Reis, R, Salvo, D, Ogilvie, D. (2016) Scaling up physical activity interventions worldwide: Stepping up to larger and smarter approaches to get people moving. The Lancet 338(10051): 1337–1348. Google Scholar, Crossref Riach, J (2015) Football agents fear ‘Wild West’ as FIFA reforms seek to cap fees. The Guardian. Available at: https://www.theguardian.com/football/2015/mar/31/football-agents-fifa-reforms (accessed 25 May 2017). Google Scholar Rossi, T, Jeanes, R (2016) Education, pedagogy and sport for development: Addressing seldom asked questions. Sport, Education and Society 21(4): 483–494. Google Scholar, Crossref Rowe, M (2016) The beautiful game? Geographical, November, pp. 33–39. Google Scholar Schulenkorf, N, Sherry, E, Rowe, K (2016) Sport for development: An integrated literature review. Journal of Sport Management 30(1): 22–39. Google Scholar, Crossref Sianes, A (2017) Shedding light on policy coherence for development: A conceptual framework. Journal of International Development 29(1): 134–146. Google Scholar, Crossref Spaaij, R, Oxford, S, Jeanes, R (2016) Transforming communities through sport? Critical pedagogy and sport for development. Sport, Education and Society 21(4): 570–587. Google Scholar, Crossref Spangenberg, JH (2017) Hot air or comprehensive progress? A critical assessment of the SDGs. Sustainable Development 25(4): 311–321. Google Scholar, Crossref Sport for Development and Peace International Working Group (SDPIWG) (2008) Harnessing the power of sport for development and peace: Recommendations to governments. Available at: https://www.sportanddev.org/sites/default/files/downloads/rtp_sdp_iwg_harnessing_the_power_of_sport_for_development_and_peace.pdf (accessed 26 July 2017). Google Scholar Suliman, S (2017) Migration and development after 2015. Globalizations 14(3): 415–431. Google Scholar, Crossref Thede, N (2013) Policy coherence for development and securitisation: Competing paradigms or stabilising North–South hierarchies? Third World Quarterly 34(5): 784–799. Google Scholar, Crossref UNESCO (2013) World-wide survey of school physical education. Available at: http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0022/002293/229335e.pdf (accessed 22 August 2017). Google Scholar UNESCO (2015) International charter of physical education, physical activity and sport. Available at: unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0023/002354/235409e.pdf (accessed 22 August 2017). Google Scholar United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) (2000) United Nations Millennium Declaration. Available at: http://www.un.org/millennium/declaration/ares552e.pdf (accessed 3 January 2018). Google Scholar United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) (2015) Transforming our world: The 2030 Agenda for sustainable development. Available at: http://www.un.org/ga/search/view_doc.asp?symbol=A/RES/70/1&Lang=E (accessed 22 August 2017). Google Scholar United Nations Office on Sport for Development and Peace (UNOSDP) (2011) Achieving the objectives of the United Nations through sport. Available at: https://www.un.org/sport/sites/www.un.org.sport/files/ckfiles/files/Achieving{\%}20the{\%}20Objectives{\%}20of{\%}20the{\%}20UN{\%}20through{\%}20Sport_Sep_2011_small.pdf (accessed 22 August 2017). Google Scholar Van der Meij, N, Darby, P, Liston, K (2017) “The downfall of a man is not the end of his life”: Navigating involuntary immobility in Ghanaian football. Sociology of Sport Journal 34(2): 183–194. Google Scholar, Crossref Verschaeve, J, Delputte, S, Orbie, J (2016) The rise of policy coherence for development: A multi-causal approach. The European Journal of Development Research 28(1): 44–61. Google Scholar, Crossref Weed, M (2016) Should we privilege sport for health? The comparative effectiveness of UK Government investment in sport as a public health intervention. International Journal of Sport Policy and Politics 8(4): 559–576. Google Scholar, Crossref Whitehead, M (ed.) (2010) Physical Literacy: Throughout the Lifecourse. Abingdon: Routledge. Google Scholar World Health Organization (WHO) (2014) Global status report on noncommunicable diseases 2014. Available at: http://www.who.int/nmh/publications/ncd-status-report-2014/en/ (accessed 22 August 2017). Google Scholar",
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Sport and the Sustainable Development Goals: Where is the policy coherence? / Lindsey, Iain; Darby, Paul.

In: International Review for the Sociology of Sport, Vol. 1, 22.01.2018, p. 1-20.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Sport and the Sustainable Development Goals: Where is the policy coherence?

AU - Lindsey, Iain

AU - Darby, Paul

N1 - Reference text: Agergaard, A, Ungruhe, C (2016) Ambivalent precarity: Career trajectories and temporalities in highly skilled sports labor migration from West Africa to Northern Europe. Anthropology of Work Review 37(2): 67–78. Google Scholar, Crossref Akindes, G, Kirwan, M (2009) Sport as international aid: Assisting development or promoting under-development in Sub-Saharan Africa? In: Levermore, R, Beacom, A (eds) Sport and International Development. Basingstoke: Macmillan, pp. 215–245. Google Scholar, Crossref Ashoff, G (2005) Enhancing policy coherence for development: Justification, recognition and approaches to achievement. DIE Studies No. 11. Bonn: German Development Institute / Deutsches Institutfür Entwicklungspolitik (DIE). Google Scholar Bakewell, O (2011) Migration and development in Sub-Saharan Africa. In: Phillips, N (ed.) Migration in the Global Political Economy. Boulder, CO: Lynne Reiner Publishers, pp. 121–142. Google Scholar Bale, J (2004) Three geographies of Africa footballer migration: Patterns, problems and postcoloniality. In: Armstrong, G, Giulianotti, R (eds) Football in Africa: Conflict, Conciliation and Community. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 229–246. Google Scholar Barry, F, King, M, Matthews, A (2010) Policy coherence for development: Five challenges. Irish Studies in International Affairs 21: 207–223. Google Scholar, Crossref Carter, T (2011) In Foreign Fields: The Politics and Experiences of Transnational Sport Migration. London: Pluto Press. Google Scholar Coalter, F (2010) The politics of sport-for-development: Limited focus programmes and broad gauge problems? International Review for the Sociology of Sport 45(3): 295–314. Google Scholar, Link Coalter, F (2013) Sport for Development: What Game Are We Playing? Abingdon: Routledge. Google Scholar Collins, M, Kay, T (2014) Sport and Social Exclusion. London: Routledge. Google Scholar Darby, P (2012) Gains versus drains: Football academies and the export of highly skilled Ghanaian football labour. The Brown Journal of World Affairs 18(2): 265–277. Google Scholar Darby, P (2013) Moving players, traversing perspectives: Global value chains, global production networks and Ghanaian football labour migration. Geoforum 50: 43–53. Google Scholar, Crossref Darby, P, Akindes, G, Kirwin, M (2007) Football academies and the migration of African football labour to Europe. Journal of Sport and Social Issues 31(2): 143–161. Google Scholar, Link Darby, P, Van der Meij, N (2018) Africa, migration and football. In: Nauright, J, Amara, M (eds) Sport in the African World. New York and London: Routledge. Google Scholar Darnell, S (2012) Sport for Development and Peace: A Critical Sociology. London: Bloomsbury Academic. Google Scholar Darnell, SC, Black, DR (2011) Mainstreaming sport into international development studies. Third World Quarterly 32(3): 367–378. Google Scholar, Crossref Darnell, SC, Giulianotti, R, Howe, PD. (2017) Re-assembling sport for development and peace through actor network theory: Insights from Kingston, Jamaica. Sociology of Sport Journal DOI: 10.1123/ssj.2016-0159 Google Scholar, Crossref Davies, L (2016) A wider role for sport: Community sports hubs and urban regeneration. Sport in Society 19(10): 1537–1555. Google Scholar, Crossref De Haas, H (2010) Migration and development: A theoretical perspective. International Migration Review 44(1): 227–264. Google Scholar, Crossref, Medline Deacon, B (2016) Assessing the SDGs from the point of view of global social governance. Journal of International and Comparative Social Policy 32(2): 116–130. Google Scholar, Crossref Drywood, E (2016) “When we buy a young boy…”: Migrant footballers, children’s rights and the case for EU intervention. In: Iusmen, I, Stalford, H (eds) The EU as a Children’s Rights Actor. Opladen; Berlin; Toronto, ON, Canada: Barbara Budrich, pp. 191–219. Google Scholar Dubé, L, Addy, N, Blouin, C. (2014) From policy coherence to 21st century convergence: A whole-of-society paradigm of human and economic development. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 1331: 201–215. Google Scholar, Crossref, Medline Esson, J (2015a) Better off at home? Rethinking responses to trafficked West African footballers in Europe. Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies 41(3): 512–530. Google Scholar, Crossref Esson, J (2015b) You have to try your luck: Male Ghanaian youth and the uncertainty of football migration. Environment and Planning A 47(6): 1383–1397. Google Scholar, Link FIFPro (2016) FIFPro Global Employment Report: Working Conditions in Professional Football. Hoofddorp: FIFPro. Google Scholar Giulianotti, R (2011) The sport, development and peace sector: A model of four social policy domains. Journal of Social Policy 40(4): 757–776. Google Scholar, Crossref Green, K (2014) Mission impossible? Reflecting upon the relationship between physical education, youth sport and lifelong participation. Sport, Education and Society 19(4): 357–375. Google Scholar, Crossref Hartmann, D, Kwauk, C (2011) Sport and development: An overview, critique and reconstruction. Journal of Sport and Social Issues 35(3): 284–305. Google Scholar, Link Haudenhuyse, R (2015) Book review of Sport and Social Exclusion (2nd ed.) by Mike Collins and Tess Kay. New York: Routledge, 2014, 320 pp.; ISBN: 978-0-415-56880-7. Social Inclusion 3(3): 153–157. Google Scholar, Crossref Hawkins, E (2016) The Lost Boys: Inside Football’s Slave Trade. London: Bloomsbury. Google Scholar Hayhurst, L (2009) The power to shape policy: Charting sport for development and peace policy discourses. International Journal of Sports Policy and Politics 1(2): 203–227. Google Scholar, Crossref Hayhurst, L (2014) The ‘Girl Effect’ and martial arts: Social entrepreneurship and sport. Gender, Place and Culture 21(3): 297–315. Google Scholar, Crossref Janus, H, Klingebiel, S, Paulo, S (2015) Beyond aid: A conceptual perspective on the transformation of development cooperation. Journal of International Development 27(2): 155–169. Google Scholar, Crossref Jeanes, R, Lindsey, I (2014) Where’s the “Evidence?” reflecting on monitoring and evaluation within sport-for-development. In: Young, K, Okada, C (eds) Sport, Social Development and Peace. Bingley: Emerald, pp. 197–217. Google Scholar, Crossref Kaczynski, AT, Henderson, KA (2007) Environmental correlates of physical activity: A review of evidence about parks and recreation. Leisure Sciences 29(4): 315–354. Google Scholar, Crossref Kay, T (2012) Accounting for legacy: Monitoring and evaluation in sport in development relationships. Sport in Society 15(6): 888–904. Google Scholar, Crossref Kay, T, Dudfield, O (2013) The Commonwealth Guide to Advancing Development through Sport. London: Commonwealth Secretariat. Google Scholar King, M (2016) Broadening the global development framework post 2015: Embracing policy coherence and global public goods. The European Journal of Development Research 28(1): 13–29. Google Scholar, Crossref Knoll, A (2014) Bringing policy coherence for development into the post-2015 agenda – Challenges and prospects. Discussion paper no. 163. Maastricht: ECDPM. Google Scholar Le Blanc, D (2015) Towards integration at last? The sustainable development goals as a network of targets. Sustainable Development 23(3): 176–187. Google Scholar, Crossref Lindsey, I (2017) Governance in sport-for-development: Problems and possibilities of (not) learning from international development. International Review for the Sociology of Sport 52(7): 801–818 Google Scholar, Link Lindsey, I, Kay, T, Jeanes, R. (2017) Localizing Global Sport for Development. Manchester: Manchester University Press. Google Scholar Meneses, JP (2013) Ninos futbolistas. Barcelona: Blackie Books. Google Scholar Nicholson, M, Hoye, R, Houlihan, B (2010) Participation in Sport: International Policy Perspectives. Abingdon: Routledge. Google Scholar Nilsson, M, Zamparutti, T, Petersen, JE. (2012) Understanding policy coherence: Analytical framework and examples of sector–environment policy interactions in the EU. Environmental Policy and Governance 22(6): 395–423. Google Scholar, Crossref Nunes, A, Lee, K, O’Riordan, T (2016) The importance of an integrating framework for achieving the sustainable development goals: The example of health and well-being. BMJ Global Health 1: e000068. DOI: 10.1136/bmjgh-2016-000068. Google Scholar, Crossref, Medline OECD (2016) Better policies for sustainable development 2016: A new framework for policy coherence. Available at: http://www.oecd.org/publications/better-policies-for-sustainable-development-2016-9789264256996-en.htm (accessed 23 March 2017). Google Scholar Pogge, T, Sengupta, M (2016) Assessing the sustainable development goals from a human rights perspective. Journal of International and Comparative Social Policy 32(2): 83–97. Google Scholar, Crossref Poli, R (2006) Africans’ status in the European football players’ labour market. Soccer and Society 7(2–3): 278–291. Google Scholar, Crossref Poli, R, Ravanel, L, Besson, R (2016a) Exporting countries in world football. CIES Football Observatory Monthly Report, International Centre for Sports Studies, 8: 1–8. Google Scholar Poli, R, Ravanel, L, Besson, R (2016b) The international mobility of minors in football. CIES Football Observatory Monthly Report, International Centre for Sports Studies, 20: 1–5. Google Scholar Reis, R, Salvo, D, Ogilvie, D. (2016) Scaling up physical activity interventions worldwide: Stepping up to larger and smarter approaches to get people moving. The Lancet 338(10051): 1337–1348. Google Scholar, Crossref Riach, J (2015) Football agents fear ‘Wild West’ as FIFA reforms seek to cap fees. The Guardian. Available at: https://www.theguardian.com/football/2015/mar/31/football-agents-fifa-reforms (accessed 25 May 2017). Google Scholar Rossi, T, Jeanes, R (2016) Education, pedagogy and sport for development: Addressing seldom asked questions. Sport, Education and Society 21(4): 483–494. Google Scholar, Crossref Rowe, M (2016) The beautiful game? Geographical, November, pp. 33–39. Google Scholar Schulenkorf, N, Sherry, E, Rowe, K (2016) Sport for development: An integrated literature review. Journal of Sport Management 30(1): 22–39. Google Scholar, Crossref Sianes, A (2017) Shedding light on policy coherence for development: A conceptual framework. Journal of International Development 29(1): 134–146. Google Scholar, Crossref Spaaij, R, Oxford, S, Jeanes, R (2016) Transforming communities through sport? Critical pedagogy and sport for development. Sport, Education and Society 21(4): 570–587. Google Scholar, Crossref Spangenberg, JH (2017) Hot air or comprehensive progress? A critical assessment of the SDGs. Sustainable Development 25(4): 311–321. Google Scholar, Crossref Sport for Development and Peace International Working Group (SDPIWG) (2008) Harnessing the power of sport for development and peace: Recommendations to governments. Available at: https://www.sportanddev.org/sites/default/files/downloads/rtp_sdp_iwg_harnessing_the_power_of_sport_for_development_and_peace.pdf (accessed 26 July 2017). Google Scholar Suliman, S (2017) Migration and development after 2015. Globalizations 14(3): 415–431. Google Scholar, Crossref Thede, N (2013) Policy coherence for development and securitisation: Competing paradigms or stabilising North–South hierarchies? Third World Quarterly 34(5): 784–799. Google Scholar, Crossref UNESCO (2013) World-wide survey of school physical education. Available at: http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0022/002293/229335e.pdf (accessed 22 August 2017). Google Scholar UNESCO (2015) International charter of physical education, physical activity and sport. Available at: unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0023/002354/235409e.pdf (accessed 22 August 2017). Google Scholar United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) (2000) United Nations Millennium Declaration. Available at: http://www.un.org/millennium/declaration/ares552e.pdf (accessed 3 January 2018). Google Scholar United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) (2015) Transforming our world: The 2030 Agenda for sustainable development. Available at: http://www.un.org/ga/search/view_doc.asp?symbol=A/RES/70/1&Lang=E (accessed 22 August 2017). Google Scholar United Nations Office on Sport for Development and Peace (UNOSDP) (2011) Achieving the objectives of the United Nations through sport. Available at: https://www.un.org/sport/sites/www.un.org.sport/files/ckfiles/files/Achieving%20the%20Objectives%20of%20the%20UN%20through%20Sport_Sep_2011_small.pdf (accessed 22 August 2017). Google Scholar Van der Meij, N, Darby, P, Liston, K (2017) “The downfall of a man is not the end of his life”: Navigating involuntary immobility in Ghanaian football. Sociology of Sport Journal 34(2): 183–194. Google Scholar, Crossref Verschaeve, J, Delputte, S, Orbie, J (2016) The rise of policy coherence for development: A multi-causal approach. The European Journal of Development Research 28(1): 44–61. Google Scholar, Crossref Weed, M (2016) Should we privilege sport for health? The comparative effectiveness of UK Government investment in sport as a public health intervention. International Journal of Sport Policy and Politics 8(4): 559–576. Google Scholar, Crossref Whitehead, M (ed.) (2010) Physical Literacy: Throughout the Lifecourse. Abingdon: Routledge. Google Scholar World Health Organization (WHO) (2014) Global status report on noncommunicable diseases 2014. Available at: http://www.who.int/nmh/publications/ncd-status-report-2014/en/ (accessed 22 August 2017). Google Scholar

PY - 2018/1/22

Y1 - 2018/1/22

N2 - This article addresses the urgent need for critical analysis of the relationships between sportand the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) enshrined in the United Nations’ globaldevelopment framework, the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Importantly, therehas yet to be any substantial academic exploration of the implications of the positionaccorded to sport as ‘an important enabler’ of the aims of 2030 Agenda and its broad set ofSDGs. In beginning to address this gap, we draw on the concept of policy coherence for tworeasons. Firstly, the designation of a specific SDG Target for policy coherence is recognitionof its centrality in working towards SDGs that are considered as ‘integrated and indivisible’.Secondly, the concept of policy coherence is centred on a dualism that enables holisticexamination of both synergies through which the contribution of sport to the SDGs can beenhanced as well as incoherencies by which sport may detract from such outcomes. Ouranalysis progresses through three examples that focus on the common orientation of the Sportfor Development and Peace ‘movement’ towards education-orientated objectives alignedwith SDG 4; potential synergies between sport participation policies and the SDG 3 Targetfor reducing non-communicable diseases; and practices within professional football inrelation to several migration-related SDG Targets. These examples show the relevance of theSDGs across diverse sectors of the sport industry and illustrate complexities within andacross countries that make pursuit of comprehensive policy coherence infeasible.Nevertheless, our analyses lead us to encourage both policy makers and researchers tocontinue to utilise the concept of policy coherence as a valuable lens to identify and considerfactors that may enable and constrain various potential contributions of sport to a range ofSDGs.

AB - This article addresses the urgent need for critical analysis of the relationships between sportand the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) enshrined in the United Nations’ globaldevelopment framework, the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Importantly, therehas yet to be any substantial academic exploration of the implications of the positionaccorded to sport as ‘an important enabler’ of the aims of 2030 Agenda and its broad set ofSDGs. In beginning to address this gap, we draw on the concept of policy coherence for tworeasons. Firstly, the designation of a specific SDG Target for policy coherence is recognitionof its centrality in working towards SDGs that are considered as ‘integrated and indivisible’.Secondly, the concept of policy coherence is centred on a dualism that enables holisticexamination of both synergies through which the contribution of sport to the SDGs can beenhanced as well as incoherencies by which sport may detract from such outcomes. Ouranalysis progresses through three examples that focus on the common orientation of the Sportfor Development and Peace ‘movement’ towards education-orientated objectives alignedwith SDG 4; potential synergies between sport participation policies and the SDG 3 Targetfor reducing non-communicable diseases; and practices within professional football inrelation to several migration-related SDG Targets. These examples show the relevance of theSDGs across diverse sectors of the sport industry and illustrate complexities within andacross countries that make pursuit of comprehensive policy coherence infeasible.Nevertheless, our analyses lead us to encourage both policy makers and researchers tocontinue to utilise the concept of policy coherence as a valuable lens to identify and considerfactors that may enable and constrain various potential contributions of sport to a range ofSDGs.

KW - 2030 Agenda

KW - education

KW - health

KW - migration

KW - United Nations

U2 - 10.1177/1012690217752651

DO - 10.1177/1012690217752651

M3 - Article

VL - 1

SP - 1

EP - 20

JO - International Review for the Sociology of Sport

T2 - International Review for the Sociology of Sport

JF - International Review for the Sociology of Sport

SN - 1012-6902

ER -