Sport and Gender Relations

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Modern sports appear to have a historically variable relative autonomy; that is to say, what happens in sport can be explained by looking at the changing balances of power between the groups involved in sports, the integration of sports in wider social figurations such as national societies, and the stage of development of wider social totalities. Using the figurational sociological perspective, this essay uses Eric Dunning's work on sport and gender (since the 1960s) to investigate further aspects of: (i) the position of different sporting disciplines in the overall status hierarchy of sports in Ireland; (ii) particular female athletes' positions within these sports; (iii) the consequences of social relations for the self-conceptions of masculine and feminine habituses; and (iv), the ways in which changes in the self-images and social make-up of male and female athletes in Ireland (as elsewhere) go hand in hand with changes in the social structure of gender relations more generally. The essay, therefore, is an attempt to outline and summarize the relevance of Dunning's work to our understanding of aspects of the sport-gender nexus in Western societies and, secondly, makes a (modest) contribution towards ‘a sociology of sport in the Republic of Ireland’.
LanguageEnglish
Pages616-633
JournalSport in Society
Volume9
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Oct 2006

Fingerprint

gender relations
Sports
Ireland
athlete
sociology of sports
figuration
totality
balance of power
gender
society
social structure
Social Relations
self-image
republic
autonomy

Keywords

  • sport
  • gender
  • Ireland
  • power relations

Cite this

Liston, Katie/K. / Sport and Gender Relations. In: Sport in Society. 2006 ; Vol. 9, No. 4. pp. 616-633.
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abstract = "Modern sports appear to have a historically variable relative autonomy; that is to say, what happens in sport can be explained by looking at the changing balances of power between the groups involved in sports, the integration of sports in wider social figurations such as national societies, and the stage of development of wider social totalities. Using the figurational sociological perspective, this essay uses Eric Dunning's work on sport and gender (since the 1960s) to investigate further aspects of: (i) the position of different sporting disciplines in the overall status hierarchy of sports in Ireland; (ii) particular female athletes' positions within these sports; (iii) the consequences of social relations for the self-conceptions of masculine and feminine habituses; and (iv), the ways in which changes in the self-images and social make-up of male and female athletes in Ireland (as elsewhere) go hand in hand with changes in the social structure of gender relations more generally. The essay, therefore, is an attempt to outline and summarize the relevance of Dunning's work to our understanding of aspects of the sport-gender nexus in Western societies and, secondly, makes a (modest) contribution towards ‘a sociology of sport in the Republic of Ireland’.",
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note = "Reference text: Birrell, S. and C. Cole, eds. Women, Sport and Culture. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics, 1994. Brinkgreve, C. “Elias on Gender Relations: The Changing Balance of Power Between the by Sexes.” In The Sociology of Norbert Elias, edited by S. Loyal and S. Quilley. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004. Byrne, A. and M. Leonard. Women and Irish Society: A Sociological Reader. Belfast: Beyond the Pale Publications, 1997. Colwell, S. “Feminisms and Figurational Sociology: Contributions to Understandings of Sport, Physical Education and Sex/Gender.” European Physical Education Review 5, no. 3 (1999): 219–40. Curtin, C., P. Jackson, and B. O’Connor. Gender in Irish Society. Galway: Galway University Press, 1987. Department of Education. The Economic Impact of Sport. Dublin: Government Publications Office, 1994. Department of Education. A National Survey of Involvement in Sport and Physical Activity. Dublin: Government Publications Office, 1996. Department of Education. Targeting Sporting Change in Ireland: Sport in Ireland, 1997–2006 and Beyond. Dublin: Government Publications Office, 1997. Dunning, E. “The Development of Football as an Organised Game.” MA thesis, University of Leicester, 1961. Dunning, E. “Figurational Sociology and the Sociology of Sport.” In Sport and Social Theory, edited by C. R. Rees and A. Miracle. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics, 1986: 29–56. Dunning, E. “The Dynamics of Modern Sport: Notes on the Achievement-Striving and the Social Significance of Sport.” In Quest for Excitement: Sport and Leisure in the Civilizing Process, edited by N. Elias and E. Dunning. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1986: 205–24. Dunning, E. “Sport as a Male Preserve: Notes on the Social Sources of Masculine Identity and its Transformations.” In Quest for Excitement: Sport and Leisure in the Civilizing Process, edited by N. Elias and E. Dunning. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1986: 267–84. Dunning, E. “Sport and Gender in a Patriarchal Society.” Paper presented at the World Congress of Sociology, Madrid, 1990. Dunning, E. “Figurational Sociology and the Sociology of Sport: Some Concluding Remarks.” In Sport and Leisure in the Civilizing Process, edited by E. Dunning and C. Rojek. Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1992: pp. 221–84. Dunning, E. Sport Matters: Sociological Studies of Sport, Violence and Civilization. London: Routledge, 1999. Dunning, E. “Figurational Contributions to the Sociological Study of Sport.” In Theory, Sport and Society, edited by J. Maguire and K. Young. London: JAI, Elsevier Science, 2002. Dunning, E. and J. Maguire. “Process-Sociological Notes on Sport, Gender Relations and Violence Control.” International Review for the Sociology of Sport 31, no. 3 (1996): 295–317. Dunning, E. and K. Sheard. “The Rugby Football Club as a Type of Male Preserve.” International Review of Sport Sociology 5 (1973): 5–24. Elias, N. “Introduction.” In Quest for Excitement: Sport and Leisure in the Civilizing Process, edited by N. Elias and E. Dunning. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1986: 41. 632 K. Liston Downloaded by [University of Ulster at Coleraine] at 04:49 21 March 2012 Elias, N. “The Changing Balance of Power Between the Sexes – A Process-Sociological Study: The Example of the Ancient Roman State.” Theory, Culture and Society 4 (1987): 287–316. Elias, N. The Society of Individuals. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1991. Elias, N. and E. Dunning. Quest for Excitement: Sport and Leisure in the Civilizing Process. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1986. Elias, N. and E. Dunning. “Leisure in the Spare-Time Spectrum.” In Quest for Excitement: Sport and Leisure in the Civilizing Process, edited by N. Elias and E. Dunning. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1986: 91–125. Fasting, K. and M. Sisjord. “Sport and Society around the Globe: Nordic Countries.” In Handbook of Sports Studies, edited by J. Coakley and E. Dunning. London: Sage, 2000: 551–3. Hargreaves, J. “Sex, Gender and the Body in Sport and Leisure: Has There Been a Civilizing Process?” In Sport and Leisure in the Civilizing Process, edited by E. Dunning and C. Rojek. London: Macmillan, 1992: 161–83. Inglis, T. Moral Monopoly: The Rise and Fall of the Catholic Church in Modern Ireland. Dublin: University College Press, 1998. Liston, K. “Playing the Masculine/Feminine Game: A Sociological Analysis of the Social Fields of Sport and Gender in Ireland.” Ph.D. diss., University College Dublin, 2004. Liston, K. and G.Menzies, eds.Women and Sport in Ireland: Report prepared for Da´il Joint Committee. Dublin: Government Publications Office, 2004. Mennell, S. Norbert Elias: An Introduction. Dublin: University College Dublin Press, 1992. O’Connor, A. P. Emerging Voices: Women in Contemporary Society. Dublin: Institute of Public Administration, 1998. Sheard, K. “Aspects of Boxing in the Western “Civilizing Process”.” International Review for the Sociology of Sport 32, no. 1 (1997): 53. Van Stolk, B. and C. Wouters. “Power Changes and Self-Respect: A Comparison of Two Cases of Established-Outsider Relations.” Theory, Culture and Society 4, no. 4 (1987): 485. Sport in Society 633 Downloaded",
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Sport and Gender Relations. / Liston, Katie/K.

In: Sport in Society, Vol. 9, No. 4, 02.10.2006, p. 616-633.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Targeting Sporting Change in Ireland: Sport in Ireland, 1997–2006 and Beyond. Dublin: Government Publications Office, 1997. Dunning, E. “The Development of Football as an Organised Game.” MA thesis, University of Leicester, 1961. Dunning, E. “Figurational Sociology and the Sociology of Sport.” In Sport and Social Theory, edited by C. R. Rees and A. Miracle. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics, 1986: 29–56. Dunning, E. “The Dynamics of Modern Sport: Notes on the Achievement-Striving and the Social Significance of Sport.” In Quest for Excitement: Sport and Leisure in the Civilizing Process, edited by N. Elias and E. Dunning. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1986: 205–24. Dunning, E. “Sport as a Male Preserve: Notes on the Social Sources of Masculine Identity and its Transformations.” In Quest for Excitement: Sport and Leisure in the Civilizing Process, edited by N. Elias and E. Dunning. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1986: 267–84. Dunning, E. “Sport and Gender in a Patriarchal Society.” Paper presented at the World Congress of Sociology, Madrid, 1990. Dunning, E. “Figurational Sociology and the Sociology of Sport: Some Concluding Remarks.” In Sport and Leisure in the Civilizing Process, edited by E. Dunning and C. Rojek. Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1992: pp. 221–84. Dunning, E. Sport Matters: Sociological Studies of Sport, Violence and Civilization. London: Routledge, 1999. Dunning, E. “Figurational Contributions to the Sociological Study of Sport.” In Theory, Sport and Society, edited by J. Maguire and K. Young. London: JAI, Elsevier Science, 2002. Dunning, E. and J. Maguire. “Process-Sociological Notes on Sport, Gender Relations and Violence Control.” International Review for the Sociology of Sport 31, no. 3 (1996): 295–317. Dunning, E. and K. Sheard. “The Rugby Football Club as a Type of Male Preserve.” International Review of Sport Sociology 5 (1973): 5–24. Elias, N. “Introduction.” In Quest for Excitement: Sport and Leisure in the Civilizing Process, edited by N. Elias and E. Dunning. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1986: 41. 632 K. Liston Downloaded by [University of Ulster at Coleraine] at 04:49 21 March 2012 Elias, N. “The Changing Balance of Power Between the Sexes – A Process-Sociological Study: The Example of the Ancient Roman State.” Theory, Culture and Society 4 (1987): 287–316. Elias, N. The Society of Individuals. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1991. Elias, N. and E. Dunning. Quest for Excitement: Sport and Leisure in the Civilizing Process. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1986. Elias, N. and E. Dunning. “Leisure in the Spare-Time Spectrum.” In Quest for Excitement: Sport and Leisure in the Civilizing Process, edited by N. Elias and E. Dunning. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1986: 91–125. Fasting, K. and M. Sisjord. “Sport and Society around the Globe: Nordic Countries.” In Handbook of Sports Studies, edited by J. Coakley and E. Dunning. London: Sage, 2000: 551–3. Hargreaves, J. “Sex, Gender and the Body in Sport and Leisure: Has There Been a Civilizing Process?” In Sport and Leisure in the Civilizing Process, edited by E. Dunning and C. Rojek. London: Macmillan, 1992: 161–83. Inglis, T. Moral Monopoly: The Rise and Fall of the Catholic Church in Modern Ireland. Dublin: University College Press, 1998. Liston, K. “Playing the Masculine/Feminine Game: A Sociological Analysis of the Social Fields of Sport and Gender in Ireland.” Ph.D. diss., University College Dublin, 2004. Liston, K. and G.Menzies, eds.Women and Sport in Ireland: Report prepared for Da´il Joint Committee. Dublin: Government Publications Office, 2004. Mennell, S. Norbert Elias: An Introduction. Dublin: University College Dublin Press, 1992. O’Connor, A. P. Emerging Voices: Women in Contemporary Society. Dublin: Institute of Public Administration, 1998. Sheard, K. “Aspects of Boxing in the Western “Civilizing Process”.” International Review for the Sociology of Sport 32, no. 1 (1997): 53. Van Stolk, B. and C. Wouters. “Power Changes and Self-Respect: A Comparison of Two Cases of Established-Outsider Relations.” Theory, Culture and Society 4, no. 4 (1987): 485. Sport in Society 633 Downloaded

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