'Soul and Body, Sound and Hearty': getting to know Bishop MacEachern.

Iain S. MacPherson, Edward MacDonald

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    The examination of a letter written by first Roman Catholic bishop of Prince Edward Island, the Scottish Highlander Angus Bernard MacEachern, written in 1832 to a former parishoner Angus Walker in which the bishop engages in clever code switching from English to Scottish Gaelic and back in order to deliver a message which could only be understood, if intercepted, by another bilingual Scottish Gaelic/English speaker. The paper reveals the historical setting of the 1832 letter and goes on to examine closely the passages of Scottish Gaelic: their meaning in terms of social commentary, their non-standard orthography which provide clues to mainland Scottish dialect variants evidenced by the same, and the descriptions of parishoners encrypted in the author's first language.
    LanguageEnglish
    Pages14-18
    JournalThe Island Magazine
    Volume1
    Issue number62
    Publication statusPublished - Nov 2007

    Fingerprint

    Scottish Gaelic
    Sound
    Letters
    Orthography
    English Speakers
    Language
    Code-switching
    Social Commentary

    Keywords

    • Scottish Gaelic
    • Scottish Gaelic nineteenth century usage in Prince Edward Island
    • code switching
    • encrypted messages

    Cite this

    MacPherson, I. S., & MacDonald, E. (2007). 'Soul and Body, Sound and Hearty': getting to know Bishop MacEachern. 1(62), 14-18.
    MacPherson, Iain S. ; MacDonald, Edward. / 'Soul and Body, Sound and Hearty': getting to know Bishop MacEachern. 2007 ; Vol. 1, No. 62. pp. 14-18.
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    MacPherson, IS & MacDonald, E 2007, ''Soul and Body, Sound and Hearty': getting to know Bishop MacEachern.', vol. 1, no. 62, pp. 14-18.

    'Soul and Body, Sound and Hearty': getting to know Bishop MacEachern. / MacPherson, Iain S.; MacDonald, Edward.

    Vol. 1, No. 62, 11.2007, p. 14-18.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    MacPherson IS, MacDonald E. 'Soul and Body, Sound and Hearty': getting to know Bishop MacEachern. 2007 Nov;1(62):14-18.