Social isolation and psychosis-like experiences: A UK general population analysis

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Abstract

Background: Social isolation is a complex construct characterised by both objective and perceived components and has been commonly identified as a risk factor for psychosis-like experiences (PLEs). Few studies, however, have modelled the association between social isolation and PLEs in the general population.Method: Data from a UK general population survey (N = 7403) were analysed using latent class analysis to identify distinct groups of individuals characterised by the same profile of social isolation. Six objective and perceived indicators of social isolation (e.g. living alone; feeling socially isolated and lonely) were modelled. Associations between classes and PLEs were analysed using multivariate binary logistic regression analysis.Results: Three classes were identified: an isolated and lonely class (Class 1), a no communication or close relationships class (Class 2) and a baseline class (Class 3). Compared to the baseline class, Class 1 was significantly more likely to endorse thought interference (OR = 2.0) and paranoia (OR = 3.3), while Class 2 was significantly more likely to endorse paranoia (OR = 8.6) and hallucinations (OR = 1.9).Conclusions: Social isolation in the general population seems to vary between two distinct groups. PLEs, in turn, seem to vary depending on the nature of this isolation.
LanguageEnglish
Pages1-10
JournalPsychosis: Psychological, Social and Integrative Approaches
VolumeOnline
Early online date25 Jul 2017
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 25 Jul 2017

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Social Isolation
Psychotic Disorders
Paranoid Disorders
Population
Hallucinations
Emotions
Logistic Models
Communication
Regression Analysis

Keywords

  • Epidemiology
  • hallucinations
  • delusions
  • social isolation
  • latent class analysis

Cite this

@article{a10ba04186eb4e558cd574da9256e294,
title = "Social isolation and psychosis-like experiences: A UK general population analysis",
abstract = "Background: Social isolation is a complex construct characterised by both objective and perceived components and has been commonly identified as a risk factor for psychosis-like experiences (PLEs). Few studies, however, have modelled the association between social isolation and PLEs in the general population.Method: Data from a UK general population survey (N = 7403) were analysed using latent class analysis to identify distinct groups of individuals characterised by the same profile of social isolation. Six objective and perceived indicators of social isolation (e.g. living alone; feeling socially isolated and lonely) were modelled. Associations between classes and PLEs were analysed using multivariate binary logistic regression analysis.Results: Three classes were identified: an isolated and lonely class (Class 1), a no communication or close relationships class (Class 2) and a baseline class (Class 3). Compared to the baseline class, Class 1 was significantly more likely to endorse thought interference (OR = 2.0) and paranoia (OR = 3.3), while Class 2 was significantly more likely to endorse paranoia (OR = 8.6) and hallucinations (OR = 1.9).Conclusions: Social isolation in the general population seems to vary between two distinct groups. PLEs, in turn, seem to vary depending on the nature of this isolation.",
keywords = "Epidemiology, hallucinations, delusions, social isolation, latent class analysis",
author = "Sarah Butter and Jamie Murphy and Shevlin Mark and James Houston",
year = "2017",
month = "7",
day = "25",
doi = "10.1080/17522439.2017.1349829",
language = "English",
volume = "Online",
pages = "1--10",
journal = "Psychosis",
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T1 - Social isolation and psychosis-like experiences: A UK general population analysis

AU - Butter, Sarah

AU - Murphy, Jamie

AU - Mark, Shevlin

AU - Houston, James

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N2 - Background: Social isolation is a complex construct characterised by both objective and perceived components and has been commonly identified as a risk factor for psychosis-like experiences (PLEs). Few studies, however, have modelled the association between social isolation and PLEs in the general population.Method: Data from a UK general population survey (N = 7403) were analysed using latent class analysis to identify distinct groups of individuals characterised by the same profile of social isolation. Six objective and perceived indicators of social isolation (e.g. living alone; feeling socially isolated and lonely) were modelled. Associations between classes and PLEs were analysed using multivariate binary logistic regression analysis.Results: Three classes were identified: an isolated and lonely class (Class 1), a no communication or close relationships class (Class 2) and a baseline class (Class 3). Compared to the baseline class, Class 1 was significantly more likely to endorse thought interference (OR = 2.0) and paranoia (OR = 3.3), while Class 2 was significantly more likely to endorse paranoia (OR = 8.6) and hallucinations (OR = 1.9).Conclusions: Social isolation in the general population seems to vary between two distinct groups. PLEs, in turn, seem to vary depending on the nature of this isolation.

AB - Background: Social isolation is a complex construct characterised by both objective and perceived components and has been commonly identified as a risk factor for psychosis-like experiences (PLEs). Few studies, however, have modelled the association between social isolation and PLEs in the general population.Method: Data from a UK general population survey (N = 7403) were analysed using latent class analysis to identify distinct groups of individuals characterised by the same profile of social isolation. Six objective and perceived indicators of social isolation (e.g. living alone; feeling socially isolated and lonely) were modelled. Associations between classes and PLEs were analysed using multivariate binary logistic regression analysis.Results: Three classes were identified: an isolated and lonely class (Class 1), a no communication or close relationships class (Class 2) and a baseline class (Class 3). Compared to the baseline class, Class 1 was significantly more likely to endorse thought interference (OR = 2.0) and paranoia (OR = 3.3), while Class 2 was significantly more likely to endorse paranoia (OR = 8.6) and hallucinations (OR = 1.9).Conclusions: Social isolation in the general population seems to vary between two distinct groups. PLEs, in turn, seem to vary depending on the nature of this isolation.

KW - Epidemiology

KW - hallucinations

KW - delusions

KW - social isolation

KW - latent class analysis

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