Shifting images: an historical and contemporary view of tourism development in the Northwest Territories of Canada

Stephen Boyd, M Amoamo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper explores from a supply-side perspective how image and language are used to promote destinations and how images change over time in response to consumer demand. The paper focuses on the representation of natural and cultural heritage in the region of Northwest Territories (NWT), Canada. Visual and oral components of the region's heritage, history, and early literature are, with contemporary travel literature, reviewed in the form of promotional brochures for the region as a whole. It was found that unique auras of destination image formation have developed over time through creative use of language and imagery, which tourism suppliers have used to differentiate products and invoke existential desire in the mind of potential visitors. Over time NWT tourism imagery has moved from promoting a natural heritage to focusing on the cultural heritage opportunities in the region. The paper concludes by proposing a model of ‘perceptions of possibility’ as a result of the interaction between supply-induced imagery, organic imagery and visitor characteristics.
LanguageEnglish
Pages3-17
JournalTourism and Hospitality Planning and Development
Volume2
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

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tourism development
imagery
cultural heritage
tourism
history
natural heritage

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@article{c20a38892d9149618da86b4e2a200889,
title = "Shifting images: an historical and contemporary view of tourism development in the Northwest Territories of Canada",
abstract = "This paper explores from a supply-side perspective how image and language are used to promote destinations and how images change over time in response to consumer demand. The paper focuses on the representation of natural and cultural heritage in the region of Northwest Territories (NWT), Canada. Visual and oral components of the region's heritage, history, and early literature are, with contemporary travel literature, reviewed in the form of promotional brochures for the region as a whole. It was found that unique auras of destination image formation have developed over time through creative use of language and imagery, which tourism suppliers have used to differentiate products and invoke existential desire in the mind of potential visitors. Over time NWT tourism imagery has moved from promoting a natural heritage to focusing on the cultural heritage opportunities in the region. The paper concludes by proposing a model of ‘perceptions of possibility’ as a result of the interaction between supply-induced imagery, organic imagery and visitor characteristics.",
author = "Stephen Boyd and M Amoamo",
note = "Reference text: 1. Amoamo, M. 2003. “Image formation and its contribution to tourism development in Canada's Northwest Territories: past and present”. Dunedin, , New Zealand: Department of Tourism, University of Otago. unpublished Masters of Tourism thesis 2. Barthes, R. 1982. Image, Music, Text, London: Fontana. 3. Beck, L. and Cable, T. 1998. Interpretation for the 21st Century: Fifteen Guiding Principles for Interpreting Nature and Culture, Champaign, IL: Sigamone Publishing. 4. Bell, C. and Lyall, J. 2002. The Accelerated Sublime Westport, CT: Praeger. 5. Berg, B. 1989. Qualitative Research Methods for Social Sciences, Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon. 6. Bayly, J. U. 1991. “Wilderness Travel”. In Canada North of 60, Edited by: Boden, J. F. and Boden, E. 209–216. Toronto: McClelland and Stewart. 7. 2003. Canadian Geographic Travel and Adventure, Spring/Summer. Canadian Tourism Commission (CTC) (1999) Canada's Image Survey, Taylor Nelson Sofres Consultants 8. Davis, S. 1997. Spectacular Nature: Corporate Culture and the Sea World Experience, CA: Berkeley: University of California Press. 9. Fox, R. F. 1994. “Introduction”. In Images in Language, Media and Mind Edited by: Fox, R. F. ix–xiii. Urbana, IL: National Council of Teachers of English. 10. Francis, D. 1986. Discovery of the North: The Exploration of Canada's Artic, Edmonton: Hurtig. 11. Gallarza, M. G., Saura, I. G. and Garcia, H. C. 2002. Destination image towards a conceptual framework. Annals of Tourism Research, 29(1): 56–78. 12. Grace, S. E. 2002. Canada and the Idea of North, Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen's University Press. 13. Guthrie, J. and Gale, P. 1991. “Positioning ski areas:”. In New Horizons Conference Proceedings, 551–69. Calgary: University of Calgary. 14. Hayes, D. 2001. First Crossing Alexander Mackenzie: His Expedition across North America, and the Opening of the Continent, Vancouver: Douglas & McIntyre. 15. Murphy, P. E. 1985. Tourism: A Community Approach, London: Methuen. 16. “NWT Arctic Tourism”. In NWT Explorers Guide 2000–3. brochures 17. Robinson, M., Evans, N. and Callaghan, P. 1996. Tourism and Culture Image, Identity and Marketing: Towards the 21st Century, Conference Proceedings, Edited by: Robinson, M., Evans, N. and Callaghan, P. Newcastle: University of Northumbria. 18. Saarinen, J. 2003. “Tourists destinations and attractions – interpretations of the spatiality of tourist motives”. available at: http://www.geo.ruc.dk/NST/NST26/Saarinen26.html, (accessed 28 January 2003) 19. Seaton, A. V. and Bennett, M. M. 1999. Marketing Tourism Products: Concepts, Issues, Cases, London: International Thomson Business. 20. Shields, R. 1992. Places on the Margin: Alternative Geographies of Modernity, London: Routledge. 21. Timothy, D. J. and Boyd, S. W. 2003. Heritage Tourism, Harlow, Essex: Prentice Hall. 22. Wang, N. 2000. Tourism and Modernity: A Sociological Analysis, Oxford: Pergamon.",
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N1 - Reference text: 1. Amoamo, M. 2003. “Image formation and its contribution to tourism development in Canada's Northwest Territories: past and present”. Dunedin, , New Zealand: Department of Tourism, University of Otago. unpublished Masters of Tourism thesis 2. Barthes, R. 1982. Image, Music, Text, London: Fontana. 3. Beck, L. and Cable, T. 1998. Interpretation for the 21st Century: Fifteen Guiding Principles for Interpreting Nature and Culture, Champaign, IL: Sigamone Publishing. 4. Bell, C. and Lyall, J. 2002. The Accelerated Sublime Westport, CT: Praeger. 5. Berg, B. 1989. Qualitative Research Methods for Social Sciences, Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon. 6. Bayly, J. U. 1991. “Wilderness Travel”. In Canada North of 60, Edited by: Boden, J. F. and Boden, E. 209–216. Toronto: McClelland and Stewart. 7. 2003. Canadian Geographic Travel and Adventure, Spring/Summer. Canadian Tourism Commission (CTC) (1999) Canada's Image Survey, Taylor Nelson Sofres Consultants 8. Davis, S. 1997. Spectacular Nature: Corporate Culture and the Sea World Experience, CA: Berkeley: University of California Press. 9. Fox, R. F. 1994. “Introduction”. In Images in Language, Media and Mind Edited by: Fox, R. F. ix–xiii. Urbana, IL: National Council of Teachers of English. 10. Francis, D. 1986. Discovery of the North: The Exploration of Canada's Artic, Edmonton: Hurtig. 11. Gallarza, M. G., Saura, I. G. and Garcia, H. C. 2002. Destination image towards a conceptual framework. Annals of Tourism Research, 29(1): 56–78. 12. Grace, S. E. 2002. Canada and the Idea of North, Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen's University Press. 13. Guthrie, J. and Gale, P. 1991. “Positioning ski areas:”. In New Horizons Conference Proceedings, 551–69. Calgary: University of Calgary. 14. Hayes, D. 2001. First Crossing Alexander Mackenzie: His Expedition across North America, and the Opening of the Continent, Vancouver: Douglas & McIntyre. 15. Murphy, P. E. 1985. Tourism: A Community Approach, London: Methuen. 16. “NWT Arctic Tourism”. In NWT Explorers Guide 2000–3. brochures 17. Robinson, M., Evans, N. and Callaghan, P. 1996. Tourism and Culture Image, Identity and Marketing: Towards the 21st Century, Conference Proceedings, Edited by: Robinson, M., Evans, N. and Callaghan, P. Newcastle: University of Northumbria. 18. Saarinen, J. 2003. “Tourists destinations and attractions – interpretations of the spatiality of tourist motives”. available at: http://www.geo.ruc.dk/NST/NST26/Saarinen26.html, (accessed 28 January 2003) 19. Seaton, A. V. and Bennett, M. M. 1999. Marketing Tourism Products: Concepts, Issues, Cases, London: International Thomson Business. 20. Shields, R. 1992. Places on the Margin: Alternative Geographies of Modernity, London: Routledge. 21. Timothy, D. J. and Boyd, S. W. 2003. Heritage Tourism, Harlow, Essex: Prentice Hall. 22. Wang, N. 2000. Tourism and Modernity: A Sociological Analysis, Oxford: Pergamon.

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N2 - This paper explores from a supply-side perspective how image and language are used to promote destinations and how images change over time in response to consumer demand. The paper focuses on the representation of natural and cultural heritage in the region of Northwest Territories (NWT), Canada. Visual and oral components of the region's heritage, history, and early literature are, with contemporary travel literature, reviewed in the form of promotional brochures for the region as a whole. It was found that unique auras of destination image formation have developed over time through creative use of language and imagery, which tourism suppliers have used to differentiate products and invoke existential desire in the mind of potential visitors. Over time NWT tourism imagery has moved from promoting a natural heritage to focusing on the cultural heritage opportunities in the region. The paper concludes by proposing a model of ‘perceptions of possibility’ as a result of the interaction between supply-induced imagery, organic imagery and visitor characteristics.

AB - This paper explores from a supply-side perspective how image and language are used to promote destinations and how images change over time in response to consumer demand. The paper focuses on the representation of natural and cultural heritage in the region of Northwest Territories (NWT), Canada. Visual and oral components of the region's heritage, history, and early literature are, with contemporary travel literature, reviewed in the form of promotional brochures for the region as a whole. It was found that unique auras of destination image formation have developed over time through creative use of language and imagery, which tourism suppliers have used to differentiate products and invoke existential desire in the mind of potential visitors. Over time NWT tourism imagery has moved from promoting a natural heritage to focusing on the cultural heritage opportunities in the region. The paper concludes by proposing a model of ‘perceptions of possibility’ as a result of the interaction between supply-induced imagery, organic imagery and visitor characteristics.

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