Severity of mental illness as a result of multiple childhood adversities: US National Epidemiologic Survey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose
To examine patterns of childhood adversity, their long-term consequences and the combined effect of different childhood adversity patterns as predictors of subsequent psychopathology.

Methods
Secondary analysis of data from the US National Epidemiologic Survey on alcohol and related conditions. Using latent class analysis to identify childhood adversity profiles; and using multinomial logistic regression to validate and further explore these profiles with a range of associated demographic and household characteristics. Finally, confirmatory factor analysis substantiated initial latent class analysis findings by investigating a range of mental health diagnoses.

Results
Latent class analysis generated a three-class model of childhood adversity in which 60 % of participants were allocated to a low adversity class; 14 % to a global adversities class (reporting exposures for all the derived latent classes); and 26 % to a domestic emotional and physical abuse class (exposed to a range of childhood adversities). Confirmatory Factor analysis defined an internalising-externalising spectrum to represent lifetime reporting patterns of mental health disorders. Using logistic regression, both adversity groups showed specific gender and race/ethnicity differences, related family discord and increased psychopathology.

Conclusions
We identified underlying patterns in the exposure to childhood adversity and associated mental health. These findings are informative in their description of the configuration of adversities, rather than focusing solely on the cumulative aspect of experience. Amelioration of longer-term negative consequences requires early identification of psychopathology risk factors that can inform protective and preventive interventions. This study highlights the utility of screening for childhood adversities when individuals present with symptoms of psychiatric disorders.
LanguageEnglish
Pages647-657
Number of pages11
JournalSocial Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology
Volume51
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 7 Mar 2016

Fingerprint

Psychopathology
mental illness
Mental Health
childhood
Statistical Factor Analysis
Logistic Models
psychopathology
Mental Disorders
mental health
Psychiatry
Alcohols
Demography
factor analysis
logistics
regression
lower class
Surveys and Questionnaires
abuse
ethnicity
alcohol

Keywords

  • Childhood adversity
  • Internalising
  • Externalising
  • Mental illness
  • Latent class analysis

Cite this

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title = "Severity of mental illness as a result of multiple childhood adversities: US National Epidemiologic Survey",
abstract = "PurposeTo examine patterns of childhood adversity, their long-term consequences and the combined effect of different childhood adversity patterns as predictors of subsequent psychopathology.MethodsSecondary analysis of data from the US National Epidemiologic Survey on alcohol and related conditions. Using latent class analysis to identify childhood adversity profiles; and using multinomial logistic regression to validate and further explore these profiles with a range of associated demographic and household characteristics. Finally, confirmatory factor analysis substantiated initial latent class analysis findings by investigating a range of mental health diagnoses.ResultsLatent class analysis generated a three-class model of childhood adversity in which 60 {\%} of participants were allocated to a low adversity class; 14 {\%} to a global adversities class (reporting exposures for all the derived latent classes); and 26 {\%} to a domestic emotional and physical abuse class (exposed to a range of childhood adversities). Confirmatory Factor analysis defined an internalising-externalising spectrum to represent lifetime reporting patterns of mental health disorders. Using logistic regression, both adversity groups showed specific gender and race/ethnicity differences, related family discord and increased psychopathology.ConclusionsWe identified underlying patterns in the exposure to childhood adversity and associated mental health. These findings are informative in their description of the configuration of adversities, rather than focusing solely on the cumulative aspect of experience. Amelioration of longer-term negative consequences requires early identification of psychopathology risk factors that can inform protective and preventive interventions. This study highlights the utility of screening for childhood adversities when individuals present with symptoms of psychiatric disorders.",
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author = "Emma Curran and Gary Adamson and Maurice Stringer and Michael Rosato and Gerard Leavey",
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Severity of mental illness as a result of multiple childhood adversities: US National Epidemiologic Survey. / Curran, Emma; Adamson, Gary; Stringer, Maurice; Rosato, Michael; Leavey, Gerard.

Vol. 51, No. 5, 07.03.2016, p. 647-657.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Adamson, Gary

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AU - Rosato, Michael

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AB - PurposeTo examine patterns of childhood adversity, their long-term consequences and the combined effect of different childhood adversity patterns as predictors of subsequent psychopathology.MethodsSecondary analysis of data from the US National Epidemiologic Survey on alcohol and related conditions. Using latent class analysis to identify childhood adversity profiles; and using multinomial logistic regression to validate and further explore these profiles with a range of associated demographic and household characteristics. Finally, confirmatory factor analysis substantiated initial latent class analysis findings by investigating a range of mental health diagnoses.ResultsLatent class analysis generated a three-class model of childhood adversity in which 60 % of participants were allocated to a low adversity class; 14 % to a global adversities class (reporting exposures for all the derived latent classes); and 26 % to a domestic emotional and physical abuse class (exposed to a range of childhood adversities). Confirmatory Factor analysis defined an internalising-externalising spectrum to represent lifetime reporting patterns of mental health disorders. Using logistic regression, both adversity groups showed specific gender and race/ethnicity differences, related family discord and increased psychopathology.ConclusionsWe identified underlying patterns in the exposure to childhood adversity and associated mental health. These findings are informative in their description of the configuration of adversities, rather than focusing solely on the cumulative aspect of experience. Amelioration of longer-term negative consequences requires early identification of psychopathology risk factors that can inform protective and preventive interventions. This study highlights the utility of screening for childhood adversities when individuals present with symptoms of psychiatric disorders.

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