Severe role impairment associated with mental disorders: Results of the WHO World Mental Health Surveys International College Student Project

Jordi Alonso, Phillipe Mortier, Randy Auerbach, Ronny Bruffaerts, Gemma Vilagut, Pim Cuijpers, Koen Demyettenaere, David Ebert, Edel Ennis, Raul Gutiérrez-García, Jennifer Greif Green, Penelope Hasking, Christine Lochner, Matthew K. Nock, Stephanie Pinder-Amaker, Nancy Sampson, Alan Zaslavsky, Ronald Kessler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: College entrance is a stressful period with a high prevalence of mental disorders. Aims: To assess the role impairment associated with 12-month mental disorders among incoming first-year college students within a large cross-national sample. Methods: Web-based self-report surveys assessing the prevalence of DSM-IV mental disorders and health-related role impairment (Sheehan Disability Scale) were obtained and analyzed from 13,984 incoming first-year college students (Response = 45.5%), across 19 universities in eightcountries. Impairment was assessed in the following domains: home management, work (e.g., college-related problems), close personal relationships, and social life. Results: Mean age of the sample was 19.3 (SD = 0.59) and 54.4% were female. Findings showed that 20.4% of students reported any severe role impairment (10% of those without a mental disordervs. 42.9% of those with at least one disorder, P < 0.01). In bivariate analyses, panic disorder, and mania were associated most frequently with severe impairment (60.6% and 57.5%, respectively). Students reporting three or more mental disorders had almost fivefold more frequently severe impairment relative to those without mental disorders. Multiple logistic regression showed that major depression (OR = 4.0; 95%CI = 3.3, 4.8), generalized anxiety (OR = 3.9;95%CI = 3.1, 4.8), and panic disorder (OR = 2.9; 95%CI 2.4, 4.2) were associated with the highest odds of severe impairment. Only minimal deviations from these overall associations were found across countries. Conclusion: Mental disorders among first-year college students are associated with substantial role impairment. Providing preventative interventions targeting mental disorders and associated impairments is a critical need for institutions to address.
LanguageEnglish
Pages802-814
Number of pages13
JournalDepression and Anxiety
Volume35
Issue number9
Early online date30 May 2018
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 30 May 2018

Fingerprint

Health Surveys
Mental Disorders
Mental Health
Students
Panic Disorder
Global Health
Bipolar Disorder
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Self Report
Anxiety
Logistic Models
Depression

Keywords

  • anxiety disorders
  • depression
  • disability
  • drug use disorders
  • intimate relationships
  • role impairment
  • social function
  • suicide/self-harm
  • university students

Cite this

Alonso, Jordi ; Mortier, Phillipe ; Auerbach, Randy ; Bruffaerts, Ronny ; Vilagut, Gemma ; Cuijpers, Pim ; Demyettenaere, Koen ; Ebert, David ; Ennis, Edel ; Gutiérrez-García, Raul ; Greif Green, Jennifer ; Hasking, Penelope ; Lochner, Christine ; Nock, Matthew K. ; Pinder-Amaker, Stephanie ; Sampson, Nancy ; Zaslavsky, Alan ; Kessler, Ronald. / Severe role impairment associated with mental disorders: Results of the WHO World Mental Health Surveys International College Student Project. In: Depression and Anxiety. 2018 ; Vol. 35, No. 9. pp. 802-814.
@article{de18b122d736458fbf1e7dd8797de8cd,
title = "Severe role impairment associated with mental disorders: Results of the WHO World Mental Health Surveys International College Student Project",
abstract = "Background: College entrance is a stressful period with a high prevalence of mental disorders. Aims: To assess the role impairment associated with 12-month mental disorders among incoming first-year college students within a large cross-national sample. Methods: Web-based self-report surveys assessing the prevalence of DSM-IV mental disorders and health-related role impairment (Sheehan Disability Scale) were obtained and analyzed from 13,984 incoming first-year college students (Response = 45.5{\%}), across 19 universities in eightcountries. Impairment was assessed in the following domains: home management, work (e.g., college-related problems), close personal relationships, and social life. Results: Mean age of the sample was 19.3 (SD = 0.59) and 54.4{\%} were female. Findings showed that 20.4{\%} of students reported any severe role impairment (10{\%} of those without a mental disordervs. 42.9{\%} of those with at least one disorder, P < 0.01). In bivariate analyses, panic disorder, and mania were associated most frequently with severe impairment (60.6{\%} and 57.5{\%}, respectively). Students reporting three or more mental disorders had almost fivefold more frequently severe impairment relative to those without mental disorders. Multiple logistic regression showed that major depression (OR = 4.0; 95{\%}CI = 3.3, 4.8), generalized anxiety (OR = 3.9;95{\%}CI = 3.1, 4.8), and panic disorder (OR = 2.9; 95{\%}CI 2.4, 4.2) were associated with the highest odds of severe impairment. Only minimal deviations from these overall associations were found across countries. Conclusion: Mental disorders among first-year college students are associated with substantial role impairment. Providing preventative interventions targeting mental disorders and associated impairments is a critical need for institutions to address.",
keywords = "anxiety disorders, depression, disability, drug use disorders, intimate relationships, role impairment, social function, suicide/self-harm, university students",
author = "Jordi Alonso and Phillipe Mortier and Randy Auerbach and Ronny Bruffaerts and Gemma Vilagut and Pim Cuijpers and Koen Demyettenaere and David Ebert and Edel Ennis and Raul Guti{\'e}rrez-Garc{\'i}a and {Greif Green}, Jennifer and Penelope Hasking and Christine Lochner and Nock, {Matthew K.} and Stephanie Pinder-Amaker and Nancy Sampson and Alan Zaslavsky and Ronald Kessler",
year = "2018",
month = "5",
day = "30",
doi = "10.1002/da.22778",
language = "English",
volume = "35",
pages = "802--814",
journal = "Depression and Anxiety",
issn = "1091-4269",
number = "9",

}

Alonso, J, Mortier, P, Auerbach, R, Bruffaerts, R, Vilagut, G, Cuijpers, P, Demyettenaere, K, Ebert, D, Ennis, E, Gutiérrez-García, R, Greif Green, J, Hasking, P, Lochner, C, Nock, MK, Pinder-Amaker, S, Sampson, N, Zaslavsky, A & Kessler, R 2018, 'Severe role impairment associated with mental disorders: Results of the WHO World Mental Health Surveys International College Student Project', Depression and Anxiety, vol. 35, no. 9, pp. 802-814. https://doi.org/10.1002/da.22778

Severe role impairment associated with mental disorders: Results of the WHO World Mental Health Surveys International College Student Project. / Alonso, Jordi; Mortier, Phillipe; Auerbach, Randy; Bruffaerts, Ronny; Vilagut, Gemma; Cuijpers, Pim; Demyettenaere, Koen; Ebert, David; Ennis, Edel; Gutiérrez-García, Raul; Greif Green, Jennifer; Hasking, Penelope; Lochner, Christine; Nock, Matthew K.; Pinder-Amaker, Stephanie; Sampson, Nancy; Zaslavsky, Alan; Kessler, Ronald.

In: Depression and Anxiety, Vol. 35, No. 9, 30.05.2018, p. 802-814.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Severe role impairment associated with mental disorders: Results of the WHO World Mental Health Surveys International College Student Project

AU - Alonso, Jordi

AU - Mortier, Phillipe

AU - Auerbach, Randy

AU - Bruffaerts, Ronny

AU - Vilagut, Gemma

AU - Cuijpers, Pim

AU - Demyettenaere, Koen

AU - Ebert, David

AU - Ennis, Edel

AU - Gutiérrez-García, Raul

AU - Greif Green, Jennifer

AU - Hasking, Penelope

AU - Lochner, Christine

AU - Nock, Matthew K.

AU - Pinder-Amaker, Stephanie

AU - Sampson, Nancy

AU - Zaslavsky, Alan

AU - Kessler, Ronald

PY - 2018/5/30

Y1 - 2018/5/30

N2 - Background: College entrance is a stressful period with a high prevalence of mental disorders. Aims: To assess the role impairment associated with 12-month mental disorders among incoming first-year college students within a large cross-national sample. Methods: Web-based self-report surveys assessing the prevalence of DSM-IV mental disorders and health-related role impairment (Sheehan Disability Scale) were obtained and analyzed from 13,984 incoming first-year college students (Response = 45.5%), across 19 universities in eightcountries. Impairment was assessed in the following domains: home management, work (e.g., college-related problems), close personal relationships, and social life. Results: Mean age of the sample was 19.3 (SD = 0.59) and 54.4% were female. Findings showed that 20.4% of students reported any severe role impairment (10% of those without a mental disordervs. 42.9% of those with at least one disorder, P < 0.01). In bivariate analyses, panic disorder, and mania were associated most frequently with severe impairment (60.6% and 57.5%, respectively). Students reporting three or more mental disorders had almost fivefold more frequently severe impairment relative to those without mental disorders. Multiple logistic regression showed that major depression (OR = 4.0; 95%CI = 3.3, 4.8), generalized anxiety (OR = 3.9;95%CI = 3.1, 4.8), and panic disorder (OR = 2.9; 95%CI 2.4, 4.2) were associated with the highest odds of severe impairment. Only minimal deviations from these overall associations were found across countries. Conclusion: Mental disorders among first-year college students are associated with substantial role impairment. Providing preventative interventions targeting mental disorders and associated impairments is a critical need for institutions to address.

AB - Background: College entrance is a stressful period with a high prevalence of mental disorders. Aims: To assess the role impairment associated with 12-month mental disorders among incoming first-year college students within a large cross-national sample. Methods: Web-based self-report surveys assessing the prevalence of DSM-IV mental disorders and health-related role impairment (Sheehan Disability Scale) were obtained and analyzed from 13,984 incoming first-year college students (Response = 45.5%), across 19 universities in eightcountries. Impairment was assessed in the following domains: home management, work (e.g., college-related problems), close personal relationships, and social life. Results: Mean age of the sample was 19.3 (SD = 0.59) and 54.4% were female. Findings showed that 20.4% of students reported any severe role impairment (10% of those without a mental disordervs. 42.9% of those with at least one disorder, P < 0.01). In bivariate analyses, panic disorder, and mania were associated most frequently with severe impairment (60.6% and 57.5%, respectively). Students reporting three or more mental disorders had almost fivefold more frequently severe impairment relative to those without mental disorders. Multiple logistic regression showed that major depression (OR = 4.0; 95%CI = 3.3, 4.8), generalized anxiety (OR = 3.9;95%CI = 3.1, 4.8), and panic disorder (OR = 2.9; 95%CI 2.4, 4.2) were associated with the highest odds of severe impairment. Only minimal deviations from these overall associations were found across countries. Conclusion: Mental disorders among first-year college students are associated with substantial role impairment. Providing preventative interventions targeting mental disorders and associated impairments is a critical need for institutions to address.

KW - anxiety disorders

KW - depression

KW - disability

KW - drug use disorders

KW - intimate relationships

KW - role impairment

KW - social function

KW - suicide/self-harm

KW - university students

U2 - 10.1002/da.22778

DO - 10.1002/da.22778

M3 - Article

VL - 35

SP - 802

EP - 814

JO - Depression and Anxiety

T2 - Depression and Anxiety

JF - Depression and Anxiety

SN - 1091-4269

IS - 9

ER -