Service users’ experiences of life supported by an Irish mental health service still battling with implementing recovery-orientated principles

Emmet Murray, Christina Greene, Orla McBride

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Current Irish governmental policies advocate the development and evaluation of recovery-orientated mental health services. This study evaluated a new recovery-orientated mental health service in the Health Service Executive West region. During 2007–2008, long-term users of the service (N = 39) were interviewed to obtain their individual perspectives and experiences of attending the service. A semi-structured interview collected quantitative and qualitative data on seven recovery-related themes. Specific emphasis was placed on assessing performance-related tasks. Schizophrenia was the most common psychiatric diagnosis (46%). The results revealed that service users relied on the service for basic needs, including regular midday meals (90%), personal care (40%), and housing (50%). One-in-four service users correctly reported a psychiatric diagnosis that was consistent with their medical file. Although several service users were forthcoming with recommendations about how the service could change in the future, acquiescence was evident in a number of interviews. In conclusion, the service in this study essentially provides care for the service users, but does not empower them to live productive and goal-orientated lives. This practice does not appear to be congruent with current government policies advocating that mental health services adopt a model of least restrictive care in daily interactions with service users.
LanguageEnglish
Pages23-38
JournalThe Irish Journal of Psychology
Volume36
Issue number1-4
Early online date6 May 2016
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 6 May 2016

Fingerprint

Life Change Events
Mental Health Services
Mental Disorders
Interviews
Policy Making
Task Performance and Analysis
Health Services
Meals
Schizophrenia

Keywords

  • service user
  • recovery
  • mental health
  • rehabilitation

Cite this

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abstract = "Current Irish governmental policies advocate the development and evaluation of recovery-orientated mental health services. This study evaluated a new recovery-orientated mental health service in the Health Service Executive West region. During 2007–2008, long-term users of the service (N = 39) were interviewed to obtain their individual perspectives and experiences of attending the service. A semi-structured interview collected quantitative and qualitative data on seven recovery-related themes. Specific emphasis was placed on assessing performance-related tasks. Schizophrenia was the most common psychiatric diagnosis (46{\%}). The results revealed that service users relied on the service for basic needs, including regular midday meals (90{\%}), personal care (40{\%}), and housing (50{\%}). One-in-four service users correctly reported a psychiatric diagnosis that was consistent with their medical file. Although several service users were forthcoming with recommendations about how the service could change in the future, acquiescence was evident in a number of interviews. In conclusion, the service in this study essentially provides care for the service users, but does not empower them to live productive and goal-orientated lives. This practice does not appear to be congruent with current government policies advocating that mental health services adopt a model of least restrictive care in daily interactions with service users.",
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Service users’ experiences of life supported by an Irish mental health service still battling with implementing recovery-orientated principles. / Murray, Emmet; Greene, Christina; McBride, Orla.

In: The Irish Journal of Psychology, Vol. 36, No. 1-4, 06.05.2016, p. 23-38.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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