Rural poverty: The impact of rurality on consumers’ access to food services, using a food poverty risk index

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Background/rationaleNorthern Ireland (NI) has a dispersed population, with 38% of citizens living in rural populations (NISRA, 2015). Geographically dispersed populations induce low levels of consumer demand which in turn yield a number of secondary characteristics including limited service provisions (Connolly et al, 2012), leaving depopulated rural areas with service provision inadequacies (O’Shea, 2009). The issues of food poverty are significant in NI. Approximately, 1/5 of households live in poverty with relative poverty rates showing to be marginally higher in rural areas (Department for Communities, 2017). Given that rural households in NI account for the highest proportion of households with children, pensioners and self-employed, rural dwellers should not be readily disregarded (Department for Communities, 2017).AimThe research aims to map and identify at risk areas that would benefit from a food poverty/food access intervention. It uses an innovative methodology of combining food poverty indicators with Geographic Information Systems (GIS) mapping to create a Food Poverty Risk Index.MethodologyData collection adopts a mixed-methods design integrating both quantitative and qualitative data sources. The target population is rural dwellers within NI. The research will systematically investigate and plot variables to identify and map areas of high deprivation in rural NI. Semi-structured interviews with key stakeholders will investigate and sense check the appropriateness of preliminary mapping. Findings will be targeted to support organisations – retailers; public health stakeholders and government policy officials – of potential pilot sites for targeted interventions.ResultsThe results of the pilot study mapping at-risk areas will be presented.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationUnknown Host Publication
Pages39-39
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 21 Mar 2018
EventMulti-disciplinary research conference on food and poverty in the UK: Taking stock, moving forward - King's College, London
Duration: 21 Mar 2018 → …

Conference

ConferenceMulti-disciplinary research conference on food and poverty in the UK: Taking stock, moving forward
Period21/03/18 → …

Fingerprint

Rural poverty
Food service
Food
Poverty
Rurality
Service provision
Rural areas
Stakeholders
Household
Geographic information systems
Consumer demand
Methodology
Mixed methods
Proportion
Structured interview
Appropriateness
Qualitative data
Rural population
Ireland
Poverty measures

Keywords

  • Food poverty
  • food poverty risk index
  • food access
  • rural

Cite this

@inproceedings{429e41a5de5a4626affbc6c4935119b1,
title = "Rural poverty: The impact of rurality on consumers’ access to food services, using a food poverty risk index",
abstract = "Background/rationaleNorthern Ireland (NI) has a dispersed population, with 38{\%} of citizens living in rural populations (NISRA, 2015). Geographically dispersed populations induce low levels of consumer demand which in turn yield a number of secondary characteristics including limited service provisions (Connolly et al, 2012), leaving depopulated rural areas with service provision inadequacies (O’Shea, 2009). The issues of food poverty are significant in NI. Approximately, 1/5 of households live in poverty with relative poverty rates showing to be marginally higher in rural areas (Department for Communities, 2017). Given that rural households in NI account for the highest proportion of households with children, pensioners and self-employed, rural dwellers should not be readily disregarded (Department for Communities, 2017).AimThe research aims to map and identify at risk areas that would benefit from a food poverty/food access intervention. It uses an innovative methodology of combining food poverty indicators with Geographic Information Systems (GIS) mapping to create a Food Poverty Risk Index.MethodologyData collection adopts a mixed-methods design integrating both quantitative and qualitative data sources. The target population is rural dwellers within NI. The research will systematically investigate and plot variables to identify and map areas of high deprivation in rural NI. Semi-structured interviews with key stakeholders will investigate and sense check the appropriateness of preliminary mapping. Findings will be targeted to support organisations – retailers; public health stakeholders and government policy officials – of potential pilot sites for targeted interventions.ResultsThe results of the pilot study mapping at-risk areas will be presented.",
keywords = "Food poverty, food poverty risk index, food access, rural",
author = "Natasha McClelland and Sinead Furey and Paul McKenzie and Lynsey Hollywood",
note = "Reference text: Connolly, S., Finn, C. and O’Shea, E. (2012) Rural ageing in Ireland: Key trends and issues. Galway: Irish Centre for Social Gerontology National University of Ireland, Galway Department for Communities (2017) Northern Ireland poverty bulletin 2015/16. Belfast: NI Direct. Available from: https://www.communities-ni.gov.uk/sites/default/files/publications/communities/ni-poverty-bulletin-201516.pdf NISRA (2015) Review of the statistical classification and delineation of settlements. Belfast: Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency. O’Shea, E. (2009) Rural ageing and public policy in Ireland in McDonagh, J., Varley, T. and Dhortall, S. (eds); A living countryside: The politics of sustainable development in rural Ireland. England: Ashgate.",
year = "2018",
month = "3",
day = "21",
language = "English",
pages = "39--39",
booktitle = "Unknown Host Publication",

}

McClelland, N, Furey, S, McKenzie, P & Hollywood, L 2018, Rural poverty: The impact of rurality on consumers’ access to food services, using a food poverty risk index. in Unknown Host Publication. pp. 39-39, Multi-disciplinary research conference on food and poverty in the UK: Taking stock, moving forward, 21/03/18.

Rural poverty: The impact of rurality on consumers’ access to food services, using a food poverty risk index. / McClelland, Natasha; Furey, Sinead; McKenzie, Paul; Hollywood, Lynsey.

Unknown Host Publication. 2018. p. 39-39.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

TY - GEN

T1 - Rural poverty: The impact of rurality on consumers’ access to food services, using a food poverty risk index

AU - McClelland, Natasha

AU - Furey, Sinead

AU - McKenzie, Paul

AU - Hollywood, Lynsey

N1 - Reference text: Connolly, S., Finn, C. and O’Shea, E. (2012) Rural ageing in Ireland: Key trends and issues. Galway: Irish Centre for Social Gerontology National University of Ireland, Galway Department for Communities (2017) Northern Ireland poverty bulletin 2015/16. Belfast: NI Direct. Available from: https://www.communities-ni.gov.uk/sites/default/files/publications/communities/ni-poverty-bulletin-201516.pdf NISRA (2015) Review of the statistical classification and delineation of settlements. Belfast: Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency. O’Shea, E. (2009) Rural ageing and public policy in Ireland in McDonagh, J., Varley, T. and Dhortall, S. (eds); A living countryside: The politics of sustainable development in rural Ireland. England: Ashgate.

PY - 2018/3/21

Y1 - 2018/3/21

N2 - Background/rationaleNorthern Ireland (NI) has a dispersed population, with 38% of citizens living in rural populations (NISRA, 2015). Geographically dispersed populations induce low levels of consumer demand which in turn yield a number of secondary characteristics including limited service provisions (Connolly et al, 2012), leaving depopulated rural areas with service provision inadequacies (O’Shea, 2009). The issues of food poverty are significant in NI. Approximately, 1/5 of households live in poverty with relative poverty rates showing to be marginally higher in rural areas (Department for Communities, 2017). Given that rural households in NI account for the highest proportion of households with children, pensioners and self-employed, rural dwellers should not be readily disregarded (Department for Communities, 2017).AimThe research aims to map and identify at risk areas that would benefit from a food poverty/food access intervention. It uses an innovative methodology of combining food poverty indicators with Geographic Information Systems (GIS) mapping to create a Food Poverty Risk Index.MethodologyData collection adopts a mixed-methods design integrating both quantitative and qualitative data sources. The target population is rural dwellers within NI. The research will systematically investigate and plot variables to identify and map areas of high deprivation in rural NI. Semi-structured interviews with key stakeholders will investigate and sense check the appropriateness of preliminary mapping. Findings will be targeted to support organisations – retailers; public health stakeholders and government policy officials – of potential pilot sites for targeted interventions.ResultsThe results of the pilot study mapping at-risk areas will be presented.

AB - Background/rationaleNorthern Ireland (NI) has a dispersed population, with 38% of citizens living in rural populations (NISRA, 2015). Geographically dispersed populations induce low levels of consumer demand which in turn yield a number of secondary characteristics including limited service provisions (Connolly et al, 2012), leaving depopulated rural areas with service provision inadequacies (O’Shea, 2009). The issues of food poverty are significant in NI. Approximately, 1/5 of households live in poverty with relative poverty rates showing to be marginally higher in rural areas (Department for Communities, 2017). Given that rural households in NI account for the highest proportion of households with children, pensioners and self-employed, rural dwellers should not be readily disregarded (Department for Communities, 2017).AimThe research aims to map and identify at risk areas that would benefit from a food poverty/food access intervention. It uses an innovative methodology of combining food poverty indicators with Geographic Information Systems (GIS) mapping to create a Food Poverty Risk Index.MethodologyData collection adopts a mixed-methods design integrating both quantitative and qualitative data sources. The target population is rural dwellers within NI. The research will systematically investigate and plot variables to identify and map areas of high deprivation in rural NI. Semi-structured interviews with key stakeholders will investigate and sense check the appropriateness of preliminary mapping. Findings will be targeted to support organisations – retailers; public health stakeholders and government policy officials – of potential pilot sites for targeted interventions.ResultsThe results of the pilot study mapping at-risk areas will be presented.

KW - Food poverty

KW - food poverty risk index

KW - food access

KW - rural

M3 - Conference contribution

SP - 39

EP - 39

BT - Unknown Host Publication

ER -