Research utilization among medical and surgical nurses: a comparison of their self reports and perceptions of barriers and facilitators.

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Although the number of studies on research utilization is steadily growing, there are only a few specialty-specific studies. AIMS: This study focuses on medical and surgical nurses. It compares their reported use of research utilization and their perceptions of barriers and obstacles. METHODS: A convenient sample of 210 medical nurses and 269 surgical nurses, from 10 general hospitals in 14 Trusts in Northern Ireland (NI), was surveyed. RESULTS: The results showed that the reported extent of research utilization was high, with less than 10% in each group reporting never/seldom using research. The reported difference between the medical and surgical nurses was very small, with medical nurses reporting a slightly higher rate of utilization. However, this was not statistically significant at 5% level. CONCLUSIONS: The Barriers Scale (Funk et al. 1991a) used in this study to assess their perceptions of barriers and facilitators revealed a similar picture for both groups. The top two barriers were "Management will not allow implementation" and "The nurse does not feel she/he has enough authority to change patient care procedures". These findings, as well as the need to take research utilization studies further, are discussed.
LanguageEnglish
Pages21-30
JournalJournal of Nursing Management
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001

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Self Concept
Self Report
Nurses
Research
Northern Ireland
General Hospitals
Patient Care

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title = "Research utilization among medical and surgical nurses: a comparison of their self reports and perceptions of barriers and facilitators.",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Although the number of studies on research utilization is steadily growing, there are only a few specialty-specific studies. AIMS: This study focuses on medical and surgical nurses. It compares their reported use of research utilization and their perceptions of barriers and obstacles. METHODS: A convenient sample of 210 medical nurses and 269 surgical nurses, from 10 general hospitals in 14 Trusts in Northern Ireland (NI), was surveyed. RESULTS: The results showed that the reported extent of research utilization was high, with less than 10{\%} in each group reporting never/seldom using research. The reported difference between the medical and surgical nurses was very small, with medical nurses reporting a slightly higher rate of utilization. However, this was not statistically significant at 5{\%} level. CONCLUSIONS: The Barriers Scale (Funk et al. 1991a) used in this study to assess their perceptions of barriers and facilitators revealed a similar picture for both groups. The top two barriers were {"}Management will not allow implementation{"} and {"}The nurse does not feel she/he has enough authority to change patient care procedures{"}. These findings, as well as the need to take research utilization studies further, are discussed.",
author = "Kader Parahoo and Eilis McCaughan",
year = "2001",
doi = "10.1111/j.1365-2834.2001.00237.x",
language = "English",
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pages = "21--30",
journal = "Journal of Nursing Management",
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T1 - Research utilization among medical and surgical nurses: a comparison of their self reports and perceptions of barriers and facilitators.

AU - Parahoo, Kader

AU - McCaughan, Eilis

PY - 2001

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N2 - BACKGROUND: Although the number of studies on research utilization is steadily growing, there are only a few specialty-specific studies. AIMS: This study focuses on medical and surgical nurses. It compares their reported use of research utilization and their perceptions of barriers and obstacles. METHODS: A convenient sample of 210 medical nurses and 269 surgical nurses, from 10 general hospitals in 14 Trusts in Northern Ireland (NI), was surveyed. RESULTS: The results showed that the reported extent of research utilization was high, with less than 10% in each group reporting never/seldom using research. The reported difference between the medical and surgical nurses was very small, with medical nurses reporting a slightly higher rate of utilization. However, this was not statistically significant at 5% level. CONCLUSIONS: The Barriers Scale (Funk et al. 1991a) used in this study to assess their perceptions of barriers and facilitators revealed a similar picture for both groups. The top two barriers were "Management will not allow implementation" and "The nurse does not feel she/he has enough authority to change patient care procedures". These findings, as well as the need to take research utilization studies further, are discussed.

AB - BACKGROUND: Although the number of studies on research utilization is steadily growing, there are only a few specialty-specific studies. AIMS: This study focuses on medical and surgical nurses. It compares their reported use of research utilization and their perceptions of barriers and obstacles. METHODS: A convenient sample of 210 medical nurses and 269 surgical nurses, from 10 general hospitals in 14 Trusts in Northern Ireland (NI), was surveyed. RESULTS: The results showed that the reported extent of research utilization was high, with less than 10% in each group reporting never/seldom using research. The reported difference between the medical and surgical nurses was very small, with medical nurses reporting a slightly higher rate of utilization. However, this was not statistically significant at 5% level. CONCLUSIONS: The Barriers Scale (Funk et al. 1991a) used in this study to assess their perceptions of barriers and facilitators revealed a similar picture for both groups. The top two barriers were "Management will not allow implementation" and "The nurse does not feel she/he has enough authority to change patient care procedures". These findings, as well as the need to take research utilization studies further, are discussed.

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