Research priorities about stoma-related quality of life from the perspective of people with a stoma: A pilot survey

Gill Hubbard, Claire Taylor, Becca Beeken, Anna Campbell, Jackie Gracey, Chloe Grimmett, Abi Fisher, Gozde Ozakinci, Sarah Slater, Trish Gorely

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

AbstractBackground: There is a recognized need to include patients in setting research priori-ties. Research priorities identified by people with a stoma are rarely elicited.Objectives: To improve the quality of life of people with a stoma through use of evidence- based practice based on research priorities set by patients.Design and Methods: Online pilot survey publicized in 2016 via United Kingdom stoma char-ities. People ranked nine stoma- related quality of life topics in order of research priority.Participants: People 16 years of age and over who currently have or have had a stoma for treatment for any medical condition.Analysis: Distributions of the priority scores for each of the nine research topics were examined. Group differences were explored using either the Mann–Whitney U- test or the Kruskal–Wallis test depending on the number of groups.Results: In total, 225 people completed the survey. The most important research priority was pouch leak problems and stoma bag/appliance problems followed by hernia risk. There were statistically significant differences in ranking research priorities between males and females, age, underlying disease that led to a stoma, stoma type and length of time with a stoma.Conclusion: People with a stoma are willing to engage in and set research priorities. The results should contribute towards future research about setting the research agenda for the study of stoma- related concerns that impact quality of life.
LanguageEnglish
Pages1421-1427
JournalHealth Expectations
Volume20
Issue number6
Early online date4 Jul 2017
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 4 Jul 2017

Fingerprint

Quality of Life
Research
Surveys and Questionnaires
Trout
Evidence-Based Practice
Hernia
Nonparametric Statistics

Keywords

  • colostomy
  • ostomy
  • public/patient involvement
  • research priorities
  • stoma
  • urostomy

Cite this

Hubbard, Gill ; Taylor, Claire ; Beeken, Becca ; Campbell, Anna ; Gracey, Jackie ; Grimmett, Chloe ; Fisher, Abi ; Ozakinci, Gozde ; Slater, Sarah ; Gorely, Trish. / Research priorities about stoma-related quality of life from the perspective of people with a stoma: A pilot survey. In: Health Expectations. 2017 ; Vol. 20, No. 6. pp. 1421-1427.
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Hubbard, G, Taylor, C, Beeken, B, Campbell, A, Gracey, J, Grimmett, C, Fisher, A, Ozakinci, G, Slater, S & Gorely, T 2017, 'Research priorities about stoma-related quality of life from the perspective of people with a stoma: A pilot survey', Health Expectations, vol. 20, no. 6, pp. 1421-1427. https://doi.org/10.1111/hex.12585

Research priorities about stoma-related quality of life from the perspective of people with a stoma: A pilot survey. / Hubbard, Gill; Taylor, Claire; Beeken, Becca; Campbell, Anna; Gracey, Jackie; Grimmett, Chloe; Fisher, Abi; Ozakinci, Gozde; Slater, Sarah; Gorely, Trish.

In: Health Expectations, Vol. 20, No. 6, 04.07.2017, p. 1421-1427.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Research priorities about stoma-related quality of life from the perspective of people with a stoma: A pilot survey

AU - Hubbard, Gill

AU - Taylor, Claire

AU - Beeken, Becca

AU - Campbell, Anna

AU - Gracey, Jackie

AU - Grimmett, Chloe

AU - Fisher, Abi

AU - Ozakinci, Gozde

AU - Slater, Sarah

AU - Gorely, Trish

PY - 2017/7/4

Y1 - 2017/7/4

N2 - AbstractBackground: There is a recognized need to include patients in setting research priori-ties. Research priorities identified by people with a stoma are rarely elicited.Objectives: To improve the quality of life of people with a stoma through use of evidence- based practice based on research priorities set by patients.Design and Methods: Online pilot survey publicized in 2016 via United Kingdom stoma char-ities. People ranked nine stoma- related quality of life topics in order of research priority.Participants: People 16 years of age and over who currently have or have had a stoma for treatment for any medical condition.Analysis: Distributions of the priority scores for each of the nine research topics were examined. Group differences were explored using either the Mann–Whitney U- test or the Kruskal–Wallis test depending on the number of groups.Results: In total, 225 people completed the survey. The most important research priority was pouch leak problems and stoma bag/appliance problems followed by hernia risk. There were statistically significant differences in ranking research priorities between males and females, age, underlying disease that led to a stoma, stoma type and length of time with a stoma.Conclusion: People with a stoma are willing to engage in and set research priorities. The results should contribute towards future research about setting the research agenda for the study of stoma- related concerns that impact quality of life.

AB - AbstractBackground: There is a recognized need to include patients in setting research priori-ties. Research priorities identified by people with a stoma are rarely elicited.Objectives: To improve the quality of life of people with a stoma through use of evidence- based practice based on research priorities set by patients.Design and Methods: Online pilot survey publicized in 2016 via United Kingdom stoma char-ities. People ranked nine stoma- related quality of life topics in order of research priority.Participants: People 16 years of age and over who currently have or have had a stoma for treatment for any medical condition.Analysis: Distributions of the priority scores for each of the nine research topics were examined. Group differences were explored using either the Mann–Whitney U- test or the Kruskal–Wallis test depending on the number of groups.Results: In total, 225 people completed the survey. The most important research priority was pouch leak problems and stoma bag/appliance problems followed by hernia risk. There were statistically significant differences in ranking research priorities between males and females, age, underlying disease that led to a stoma, stoma type and length of time with a stoma.Conclusion: People with a stoma are willing to engage in and set research priorities. The results should contribute towards future research about setting the research agenda for the study of stoma- related concerns that impact quality of life.

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KW - ostomy

KW - public/patient involvement

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KW - stoma

KW - urostomy

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DO - 10.1111/hex.12585

M3 - Article

VL - 20

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JO - Health Expectations

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ER -