Relation between neurological status, refractive error, and visual acuity in children: a clinical study.

R T Mackie, D L McCulloch, Kathryn Saunders, R E Day, S Phillips, G N Dutton

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Abstract

The aims of the present study were: (1) to determine the refractive status and visual acuity of a group of 75 neurologically impaired children (5 to 192 months of age); and (2) to investigate the relation between the visual and neurological status of these children. Refractive error was determined using non-cycloplegic near retinoscopy and visual acuity was estimated using acuity cards (Keeler or Cardiff) and pattern-onset visual evoked potentials (VEP). Subjects demonstrated a markedly different distribution of refractive error from that of a neurologically normal age-matched population. Refractive error anomalies were more prevalent in children older than 5 years, suggesting abnormal refractive development. A wide range of visual acuity was found with both tests (acuity cards, 0.07 to 2.08 logMAR; VEP, O.78 to 2.68 logMAR). Visual acuity and refractive status varied with level and type of physical impairment. Level of intellectual impairment exhibited a weak relation with visual status.
LanguageEnglish
Pages31-7
JournalDevelopmental Medicine and Child Neurology
Volume40
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 1998

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Refractive Errors
Visual Acuity
Visual Evoked Potentials
Retinoscopy
Clinical Studies
Population

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abstract = "The aims of the present study were: (1) to determine the refractive status and visual acuity of a group of 75 neurologically impaired children (5 to 192 months of age); and (2) to investigate the relation between the visual and neurological status of these children. Refractive error was determined using non-cycloplegic near retinoscopy and visual acuity was estimated using acuity cards (Keeler or Cardiff) and pattern-onset visual evoked potentials (VEP). Subjects demonstrated a markedly different distribution of refractive error from that of a neurologically normal age-matched population. Refractive error anomalies were more prevalent in children older than 5 years, suggesting abnormal refractive development. A wide range of visual acuity was found with both tests (acuity cards, 0.07 to 2.08 logMAR; VEP, O.78 to 2.68 logMAR). Visual acuity and refractive status varied with level and type of physical impairment. Level of intellectual impairment exhibited a weak relation with visual status.",
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Relation between neurological status, refractive error, and visual acuity in children: a clinical study. / Mackie, R T; McCulloch, D L; Saunders, Kathryn; Day, R E; Phillips, S; Dutton, G N.

In: Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, Vol. 40, No. 1, 1998, p. 31-7.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Relation between neurological status, refractive error, and visual acuity in children: a clinical study.

AU - Mackie, R T

AU - McCulloch, D L

AU - Saunders, Kathryn

AU - Day, R E

AU - Phillips, S

AU - Dutton, G N

PY - 1998

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AB - The aims of the present study were: (1) to determine the refractive status and visual acuity of a group of 75 neurologically impaired children (5 to 192 months of age); and (2) to investigate the relation between the visual and neurological status of these children. Refractive error was determined using non-cycloplegic near retinoscopy and visual acuity was estimated using acuity cards (Keeler or Cardiff) and pattern-onset visual evoked potentials (VEP). Subjects demonstrated a markedly different distribution of refractive error from that of a neurologically normal age-matched population. Refractive error anomalies were more prevalent in children older than 5 years, suggesting abnormal refractive development. A wide range of visual acuity was found with both tests (acuity cards, 0.07 to 2.08 logMAR; VEP, O.78 to 2.68 logMAR). Visual acuity and refractive status varied with level and type of physical impairment. Level of intellectual impairment exhibited a weak relation with visual status.

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