Reflecting on Reflection: Assessment FOR Learning and Employability in Event Management Education: Enhancing students professional practice in event management through reflection on their personal and professional skills development

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

This paper reflects on the use of reflection by students on student produced events, as one element of assessment in event management modules. The paper focuses on reflective journals, reports and videos by students as a form of assessment. It will discuss the assessment of student led events within the pedagogical frame of assessment for learning (see for example Woodward 2006; McClean 2018). While "some see assessment and learning as two separate entities", others join these together for "added strength" (Woodward 2006, p.415). The argument proposed is that reflective assessment in event management education is important for learning instead of being an assessment of learning. The first section will detail and discuss the practical skills involved in the students' planning, executing and evaluation of a student produced event. While Barron and Ali-Knight (2017) have found in the past, event management "graduates felt academically prepared for working life in the industry, but lacked the practical skills required" (Barron and Ali-Knight 2017); the future of event management education strives to include more practical skills. The generic skills highlighted in the Subject Benchmark statement for example, include the ability of graduates to: "creatively plan, design, lead, manage and execute practical activities using appropriate techniques and procedures while demonstrating high levels of relevant skills". (QAA 2016, p15) But how are these best assessed? It concludes that student reflection on the student led event management process, is a vital part of assessment for learning, within a theoretical reconceptualisation of assessment and learning, "as an integrated and dialogic process" (McLean 2018, unpaignated). The paper will use the case study of The Corporate Events Module delivered within Ulster University's Department of Hospitality and Tourism Management and incorporate survey data and responses from student interviews by the authors. References Barron, P. and Ali-Knight J. (2017) Aspirations and progression of event management graduates: A study of career development, Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Management Volume 30, March 2017, Pages 29-38 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhtm.2017.01.005 McLean, H. (2018) This is the way to teach: insights from academics and students about assessment that supports learning, Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, DOI: 10.1080/02602938.2018.1446508 QAA (2016) Subject Benchmark Statement: Events, Hospitality, Leisure, Sport and Tourism Nov 2016 Woodward, H. (2006) Reflective Journals and Portfolios: learning through assessment, Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 23:4, 415-423, DOI: 10.1080/0260293980230408
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationaeme Events Education and Research: Coming of Age
Subtitle of host publication15th Association for Events Management Eudcation Educators Forum
Place of PublicationLeeds
Pages22
Volume1
Edition1
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 2018
EventEvents Education & Research: Coming of Age, the AEME 15th Events Management Educators Forum - Leeds Beckett University, Leeds, United Kingdom
Duration: 4 Jul 20185 Jul 2018

Conference

ConferenceEvents Education & Research: Coming of Age, the AEME 15th Events Management Educators Forum
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityLeeds
Period4/07/185/07/18

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employability
event
management
learning
education
student
Tourism
graduate
evaluation
process management
working life
Sports
video

Cite this

@inproceedings{9f04eb836e944de4b3b90e7d32beb060,
title = "Reflecting on Reflection: Assessment FOR Learning and Employability in Event Management Education: Enhancing students professional practice in event management through reflection on their personal and professional skills development",
abstract = "This paper reflects on the use of reflection by students on student produced events, as one element of assessment in event management modules. The paper focuses on reflective journals, reports and videos by students as a form of assessment. It will discuss the assessment of student led events within the pedagogical frame of assessment for learning (see for example Woodward 2006; McClean 2018). While {"}some see assessment and learning as two separate entities{"}, others join these together for {"}added strength{"} (Woodward 2006, p.415). The argument proposed is that reflective assessment in event management education is important for learning instead of being an assessment of learning. The first section will detail and discuss the practical skills involved in the students' planning, executing and evaluation of a student produced event. While Barron and Ali-Knight (2017) have found in the past, event management {"}graduates felt academically prepared for working life in the industry, but lacked the practical skills required{"} (Barron and Ali-Knight 2017); the future of event management education strives to include more practical skills. The generic skills highlighted in the Subject Benchmark statement for example, include the ability of graduates to: {"}creatively plan, design, lead, manage and execute practical activities using appropriate techniques and procedures while demonstrating high levels of relevant skills{"}. (QAA 2016, p15) But how are these best assessed? It concludes that student reflection on the student led event management process, is a vital part of assessment for learning, within a theoretical reconceptualisation of assessment and learning, {"}as an integrated and dialogic process{"} (McLean 2018, unpaignated). The paper will use the case study of The Corporate Events Module delivered within Ulster University's Department of Hospitality and Tourism Management and incorporate survey data and responses from student interviews by the authors. References Barron, P. and Ali-Knight J. (2017) Aspirations and progression of event management graduates: A study of career development, Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Management Volume 30, March 2017, Pages 29-38 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhtm.2017.01.005 McLean, H. (2018) This is the way to teach: insights from academics and students about assessment that supports learning, Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, DOI: 10.1080/02602938.2018.1446508 QAA (2016) Subject Benchmark Statement: Events, Hospitality, Leisure, Sport and Tourism Nov 2016 Woodward, H. (2006) Reflective Journals and Portfolios: learning through assessment, Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 23:4, 415-423, DOI: 10.1080/0260293980230408",
author = "Harriet Purkis and Nikki McQuillan",
year = "2018",
language = "English",
volume = "1",
pages = "22",
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}

Purkis, H & McQuillan, N 2018, Reflecting on Reflection: Assessment FOR Learning and Employability in Event Management Education: Enhancing students professional practice in event management through reflection on their personal and professional skills development. in aeme Events Education and Research: Coming of Age: 15th Association for Events Management Eudcation Educators Forum. 1 edn, vol. 1, Leeds, pp. 22, Events Education & Research: Coming of Age, the AEME 15th Events Management Educators Forum , Leeds, United Kingdom, 4/07/18.

Reflecting on Reflection: Assessment FOR Learning and Employability in Event Management Education : Enhancing students professional practice in event management through reflection on their personal and professional skills development. / Purkis, Harriet; McQuillan, Nikki.

aeme Events Education and Research: Coming of Age: 15th Association for Events Management Eudcation Educators Forum. Vol. 1 1. ed. Leeds, 2018. p. 22.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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N2 - This paper reflects on the use of reflection by students on student produced events, as one element of assessment in event management modules. The paper focuses on reflective journals, reports and videos by students as a form of assessment. It will discuss the assessment of student led events within the pedagogical frame of assessment for learning (see for example Woodward 2006; McClean 2018). While "some see assessment and learning as two separate entities", others join these together for "added strength" (Woodward 2006, p.415). The argument proposed is that reflective assessment in event management education is important for learning instead of being an assessment of learning. The first section will detail and discuss the practical skills involved in the students' planning, executing and evaluation of a student produced event. While Barron and Ali-Knight (2017) have found in the past, event management "graduates felt academically prepared for working life in the industry, but lacked the practical skills required" (Barron and Ali-Knight 2017); the future of event management education strives to include more practical skills. The generic skills highlighted in the Subject Benchmark statement for example, include the ability of graduates to: "creatively plan, design, lead, manage and execute practical activities using appropriate techniques and procedures while demonstrating high levels of relevant skills". (QAA 2016, p15) But how are these best assessed? It concludes that student reflection on the student led event management process, is a vital part of assessment for learning, within a theoretical reconceptualisation of assessment and learning, "as an integrated and dialogic process" (McLean 2018, unpaignated). The paper will use the case study of The Corporate Events Module delivered within Ulster University's Department of Hospitality and Tourism Management and incorporate survey data and responses from student interviews by the authors. References Barron, P. and Ali-Knight J. (2017) Aspirations and progression of event management graduates: A study of career development, Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Management Volume 30, March 2017, Pages 29-38 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhtm.2017.01.005 McLean, H. (2018) This is the way to teach: insights from academics and students about assessment that supports learning, Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, DOI: 10.1080/02602938.2018.1446508 QAA (2016) Subject Benchmark Statement: Events, Hospitality, Leisure, Sport and Tourism Nov 2016 Woodward, H. (2006) Reflective Journals and Portfolios: learning through assessment, Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 23:4, 415-423, DOI: 10.1080/0260293980230408

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