Re-imaging and modern memory of the Great War

Peter Neill

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Abstract

    The paper examines and contextualises the results of practice-led research into the Great War experience of Irish landowner and soldier, Col. Robert David Perceval-Maxwell (13 Royal Irish Rifles). It makes use of several parallel narratives: the Estate Manager’s daily record, the official war history, War Diaries and Perceval-Maxwell’s personal correspondence to his wife, mother and children.The research investigates both the differences and the similarities between agricultural estate management and the overseeing of a foreign military campaign. It visually interrogates how twentieth century conflict transformed neutral landscape from a function of cultivation and animal husbandry to that of defence, aggression, military support and infrastructure. I have used photographic methods to (re)present the existing post war terrain and to examine how artistic intervention and production can re-interpret established historical parameters and viewpoints. The gradual, stealthy and surreptitious reconstruction of the theatre of the conflict continues as the land quietly recovers and heals itself from the physical wounds inflicted almost one hundred years ago. The practical and emotional post-war reaction to the conflict was the construction and rapid establishment of numerous war cemeteries to contain and honour the human sacrifice. Here, I make a visual comparison between Perceval-Maxwell’s ‘home’ land, which he passionately cared for, and his militarily adopted land which he dutifully managed as a professional soldier. The photographic study compares the former theatre of war with that of his estate in Ireland and examines real and perceived traces of visual evidence to re-evaluate modern memory of the conflict.
    LanguageEnglish
    Title of host publicationUnknown Host Publication
    Number of pages0
    Publication statusPublished - 2012
    EventWar and Memory - Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw, Poland
    Duration: 1 Jan 2012 → …

    Conference

    ConferenceWar and Memory
    Period1/01/12 → …

    Fingerprint

    World War I
    Imaging
    Estate
    Soldiers
    Military
    Aggression
    Cemetery
    Visual Evidence
    Diary
    Ireland
    Managers
    History
    David Roberts
    Landowners
    Physical
    Wives
    Emotion
    Animal Husbandry
    Human Sacrifice

    Keywords

    • War memory Europe artistic cultural representation Great War

    Cite this

    Neill, P. (2012). Re-imaging and modern memory of the Great War. In Unknown Host Publication
    Neill, Peter. / Re-imaging and modern memory of the Great War. Unknown Host Publication. 2012.
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    Neill, P 2012, Re-imaging and modern memory of the Great War. in Unknown Host Publication. War and Memory, 1/01/12.

    Re-imaging and modern memory of the Great War. / Neill, Peter.

    Unknown Host Publication. 2012.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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    Neill P. Re-imaging and modern memory of the Great War. In Unknown Host Publication. 2012