Public perceptions of personalised nutrition through the lens of Social Cognitive Theory

Audrey Rankin, Sharron Kuznesof, Lynn J. Frewer, Karen Orr, Jenny Davison, Maria DV de Almeida, Barbara Stewart-Knox

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Social Cognitive Theory has been used to explain findings derived from focus group discussions (N = 4) held in the United Kingdom with the aim of informing best practice in personalised nutrition. Positive expectancies included weight loss and negative expectancies surrounded on-line security. Monitoring and feedback were crucial to goal setting and progress. Coaching by the service provider, family and friends was deemed important for self-efficacy. Paying for personalised nutrition symbolised commitment to behaviour change. The social context of eating, however, was perceived a problem and should be considered when designing personalised diets. Social Cognitive Theory could provide an effective framework through which to deliver personalised nutrition.
LanguageEnglish
Pages1233-1242
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Health Psychology
Volume22
Issue number10
Early online date1 Feb 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2017

Fingerprint

Lenses
Self Efficacy
Focus Groups
Practice Guidelines
Weight Loss
Eating
Diet
Social Theory
Mentoring
United Kingdom

Keywords

  • Focus group, Food4Me, Personalised nutrition, Self-efficacy, Social Cognitive Theory

Cite this

Rankin, A., Kuznesof, S., Frewer, L. J., Orr, K., Davison, J., de Almeida, M. DV., & Stewart-Knox, B. (2017). Public perceptions of personalised nutrition through the lens of Social Cognitive Theory. Journal of Health Psychology, 22(10), 1233-1242. https://doi.org/10.1177/1359105315624750
Rankin, Audrey ; Kuznesof, Sharron ; Frewer, Lynn J. ; Orr, Karen ; Davison, Jenny ; de Almeida, Maria DV ; Stewart-Knox, Barbara. / Public perceptions of personalised nutrition through the lens of Social Cognitive Theory. In: Journal of Health Psychology. 2017 ; Vol. 22, No. 10. pp. 1233-1242.
@article{625867bd4faf4539ae3ddef6e067a895,
title = "Public perceptions of personalised nutrition through the lens of Social Cognitive Theory",
abstract = "Social Cognitive Theory has been used to explain findings derived from focus group discussions (N = 4) held in the United Kingdom with the aim of informing best practice in personalised nutrition. Positive expectancies included weight loss and negative expectancies surrounded on-line security. Monitoring and feedback were crucial to goal setting and progress. Coaching by the service provider, family and friends was deemed important for self-efficacy. Paying for personalised nutrition symbolised commitment to behaviour change. The social context of eating, however, was perceived a problem and should be considered when designing personalised diets. Social Cognitive Theory could provide an effective framework through which to deliver personalised nutrition.",
keywords = "Focus group, Food4Me, Personalised nutrition, Self-efficacy, Social Cognitive Theory",
author = "Audrey Rankin and Sharron Kuznesof and Frewer, {Lynn J.} and Karen Orr and Jenny Davison and {de Almeida}, {Maria DV} and Barbara Stewart-Knox",
year = "2017",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1177/1359105315624750",
language = "English",
volume = "22",
pages = "1233--1242",
journal = "Journal of Health Psychology",
issn = "1359-1053",
number = "10",

}

Rankin, A, Kuznesof, S, Frewer, LJ, Orr, K, Davison, J, de Almeida, MDV & Stewart-Knox, B 2017, 'Public perceptions of personalised nutrition through the lens of Social Cognitive Theory', Journal of Health Psychology, vol. 22, no. 10, pp. 1233-1242. https://doi.org/10.1177/1359105315624750

Public perceptions of personalised nutrition through the lens of Social Cognitive Theory. / Rankin, Audrey; Kuznesof, Sharron; Frewer, Lynn J.; Orr, Karen; Davison, Jenny; de Almeida, Maria DV; Stewart-Knox, Barbara.

In: Journal of Health Psychology, Vol. 22, No. 10, 09.2017, p. 1233-1242.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Public perceptions of personalised nutrition through the lens of Social Cognitive Theory

AU - Rankin, Audrey

AU - Kuznesof, Sharron

AU - Frewer, Lynn J.

AU - Orr, Karen

AU - Davison, Jenny

AU - de Almeida, Maria DV

AU - Stewart-Knox, Barbara

PY - 2017/9

Y1 - 2017/9

N2 - Social Cognitive Theory has been used to explain findings derived from focus group discussions (N = 4) held in the United Kingdom with the aim of informing best practice in personalised nutrition. Positive expectancies included weight loss and negative expectancies surrounded on-line security. Monitoring and feedback were crucial to goal setting and progress. Coaching by the service provider, family and friends was deemed important for self-efficacy. Paying for personalised nutrition symbolised commitment to behaviour change. The social context of eating, however, was perceived a problem and should be considered when designing personalised diets. Social Cognitive Theory could provide an effective framework through which to deliver personalised nutrition.

AB - Social Cognitive Theory has been used to explain findings derived from focus group discussions (N = 4) held in the United Kingdom with the aim of informing best practice in personalised nutrition. Positive expectancies included weight loss and negative expectancies surrounded on-line security. Monitoring and feedback were crucial to goal setting and progress. Coaching by the service provider, family and friends was deemed important for self-efficacy. Paying for personalised nutrition symbolised commitment to behaviour change. The social context of eating, however, was perceived a problem and should be considered when designing personalised diets. Social Cognitive Theory could provide an effective framework through which to deliver personalised nutrition.

KW - Focus group, Food4Me, Personalised nutrition, Self-efficacy, Social Cognitive Theory

U2 - 10.1177/1359105315624750

DO - 10.1177/1359105315624750

M3 - Article

VL - 22

SP - 1233

EP - 1242

JO - Journal of Health Psychology

T2 - Journal of Health Psychology

JF - Journal of Health Psychology

SN - 1359-1053

IS - 10

ER -