Providing meaningful care: learning from the experiences of suicidal men

Joanne Jordan, Sinead Keeney, Hugh McKenna, John Cutcliffe, Christime Stevenson, Paul F Slater, Iain McGowan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Little is known about young suicidal men’s preferences for care. Using a broad interpretive approach, we interviewed 36 formerly suicidal young men in a study addressing the development and provision of mental health services. Our analysis yielded three core categories: widening access and bolstering proactive outreach, on becoming a man, and equipping young men for future challenges. Collectively, these categories suggest key features and processes of appropriate service configuration and clinical care: (a) services that reach out proactively serve to encourage young men’s initial and ongoing engagement; (b) care delivered over the long term ensures a necessary focus on a meaningful future life; (c) mental health professionals (MHPs) are centrally involved alongside significant others, including those with personal experience of suicide; and (d) the development of a vital interpersonal connection is based on MHPs actively communicating their empathy, open-mindedness, and interest in a young man’s unique biography.
LanguageEnglish
Pages1207-1219
JournalQualitative Health Research
Volume22
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Sep 2012

Fingerprint

learning
experience
mental health
health professionals
empathy
suicide
health service

Keywords

  • suicide
  • suicide prevention
  • young men

Cite this

Jordan, J., Keeney, S., McKenna, H., Cutcliffe, J., Stevenson, C., Slater, P. F., & McGowan, I. (2012). Providing meaningful care: learning from the experiences of suicidal men. Qualitative Health Research, 22(9), 1207-1219. https://doi.org/10.1177/1049732312450367
Jordan, Joanne ; Keeney, Sinead ; McKenna, Hugh ; Cutcliffe, John ; Stevenson, Christime ; Slater, Paul F ; McGowan, Iain. / Providing meaningful care: learning from the experiences of suicidal men. In: Qualitative Health Research. 2012 ; Vol. 22, No. 9. pp. 1207-1219.
@article{d1d8d73e897d456eae82f8f8479561f1,
title = "Providing meaningful care: learning from the experiences of suicidal men",
abstract = "Little is known about young suicidal men’s preferences for care. Using a broad interpretive approach, we interviewed 36 formerly suicidal young men in a study addressing the development and provision of mental health services. Our analysis yielded three core categories: widening access and bolstering proactive outreach, on becoming a man, and equipping young men for future challenges. Collectively, these categories suggest key features and processes of appropriate service configuration and clinical care: (a) services that reach out proactively serve to encourage young men’s initial and ongoing engagement; (b) care delivered over the long term ensures a necessary focus on a meaningful future life; (c) mental health professionals (MHPs) are centrally involved alongside significant others, including those with personal experience of suicide; and (d) the development of a vital interpersonal connection is based on MHPs actively communicating their empathy, open-mindedness, and interest in a young man’s unique biography.",
keywords = "suicide, suicide prevention, young men",
author = "Joanne Jordan and Sinead Keeney and Hugh McKenna and John Cutcliffe and Christime Stevenson and Slater, {Paul F} and Iain McGowan",
year = "2012",
month = "9",
day = "30",
doi = "10.1177/1049732312450367",
language = "English",
volume = "22",
pages = "1207--1219",
journal = "Qualitative Health Research",
issn = "1049-7323",
number = "9",

}

Jordan, J, Keeney, S, McKenna, H, Cutcliffe, J, Stevenson, C, Slater, PF & McGowan, I 2012, 'Providing meaningful care: learning from the experiences of suicidal men', Qualitative Health Research, vol. 22, no. 9, pp. 1207-1219. https://doi.org/10.1177/1049732312450367

Providing meaningful care: learning from the experiences of suicidal men. / Jordan, Joanne; Keeney, Sinead; McKenna, Hugh; Cutcliffe, John; Stevenson, Christime; Slater, Paul F; McGowan, Iain.

In: Qualitative Health Research, Vol. 22, No. 9, 30.09.2012, p. 1207-1219.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Providing meaningful care: learning from the experiences of suicidal men

AU - Jordan, Joanne

AU - Keeney, Sinead

AU - McKenna, Hugh

AU - Cutcliffe, John

AU - Stevenson, Christime

AU - Slater, Paul F

AU - McGowan, Iain

PY - 2012/9/30

Y1 - 2012/9/30

N2 - Little is known about young suicidal men’s preferences for care. Using a broad interpretive approach, we interviewed 36 formerly suicidal young men in a study addressing the development and provision of mental health services. Our analysis yielded three core categories: widening access and bolstering proactive outreach, on becoming a man, and equipping young men for future challenges. Collectively, these categories suggest key features and processes of appropriate service configuration and clinical care: (a) services that reach out proactively serve to encourage young men’s initial and ongoing engagement; (b) care delivered over the long term ensures a necessary focus on a meaningful future life; (c) mental health professionals (MHPs) are centrally involved alongside significant others, including those with personal experience of suicide; and (d) the development of a vital interpersonal connection is based on MHPs actively communicating their empathy, open-mindedness, and interest in a young man’s unique biography.

AB - Little is known about young suicidal men’s preferences for care. Using a broad interpretive approach, we interviewed 36 formerly suicidal young men in a study addressing the development and provision of mental health services. Our analysis yielded three core categories: widening access and bolstering proactive outreach, on becoming a man, and equipping young men for future challenges. Collectively, these categories suggest key features and processes of appropriate service configuration and clinical care: (a) services that reach out proactively serve to encourage young men’s initial and ongoing engagement; (b) care delivered over the long term ensures a necessary focus on a meaningful future life; (c) mental health professionals (MHPs) are centrally involved alongside significant others, including those with personal experience of suicide; and (d) the development of a vital interpersonal connection is based on MHPs actively communicating their empathy, open-mindedness, and interest in a young man’s unique biography.

KW - suicide

KW - suicide prevention

KW - young men

U2 - 10.1177/1049732312450367

DO - 10.1177/1049732312450367

M3 - Article

VL - 22

SP - 1207

EP - 1219

JO - Qualitative Health Research

T2 - Qualitative Health Research

JF - Qualitative Health Research

SN - 1049-7323

IS - 9

ER -