Promoting the social inclusion of children with Autism Spectrum Disorders in community groups.

Roy McConkey, Audrey Mullan, Jackie Addis

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are not easily included inmainstream youth activities provided by the community and voluntary sector(CVS) such as scouts, sports organisations and youth clubs. Two studies wereundertaken. First, a survey of over 200 personnel from CVS groups to ascertaintheir previous experience of these children and reactions to their enrolment.Second, in light of the findings, a short, two-hour introductory training course onASD targeted at youth leaders was devised and evaluated with nearly 400participants. Most participants reported changes in their attitudes and perceptionsas well as citing a range of information they had gained from attending. Furtherresearch is needed into the reasons why CVS groups are disinclined to enrolchildren with ASD and in targeting awareness raising and training opportunitiesmore specifically within this sector.
    LanguageEnglish
    Pages827-835
    JournalEarly Childhood Development and Care
    Volume182
    Issue number7
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2012

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    clubs
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    Cite this

    McConkey, Roy ; Mullan, Audrey ; Addis, Jackie. / Promoting the social inclusion of children with Autism Spectrum Disorders in community groups. In: Early Childhood Development and Care. 2012 ; Vol. 182, No. 7. pp. 827-835.
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    Promoting the social inclusion of children with Autism Spectrum Disorders in community groups. / McConkey, Roy; Mullan, Audrey; Addis, Jackie.

    In: Early Childhood Development and Care, Vol. 182, No. 7, 01.10.2012, p. 827-835.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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