Prolonged GIP receptor activation using stable mini-PEGylated GIP improves glucose homeostasis and beta-cell function in age-related glucose intolerance

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Abstract

in older populations there is significant increase in incidence of impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) improves glycemic control but its use as a therapeutic is hindered by short biological half-life. The present study examined effects of a longer-acting form of GIP, GIP[mPEG], on glucose homeostasis and beta-cell function in mice with age-related glucose intolerance. GIP[mPEG] decreased glucose and increased insulin concentrations when administered prior to a glucose challenge. Daily administration of GIP[mPEG] for 20 days had no effect on body weight and food intake. However, non-fasting glucose concentrations were decreased and insulin concentrations increased. Glycemic response to intraperitoneal glucose was improved and glucose-mediated insulin secretion enhanced. Insulin sensitivity, circulating triglycerides and resistin levels were unchanged by the treatment regimen, but plasma adiponectin levels increased. These data indicate that prolonged activation of the GIP receptor with GIP[mPEG] counters aspects of impaired beta-cell function and age-related glucose intolerance. (C) 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
LanguageEnglish
Pages219-225
JournalPeptides
Volume30
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2009

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Glucose Intolerance
Homeostasis
Glucose
Peptides
Insulin
gastric inhibitory polypeptide receptor
Resistin
Adiponectin
Half-Life
Insulin Resistance
Triglycerides
Eating
Body Weight

Cite this

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title = "Prolonged GIP receptor activation using stable mini-PEGylated GIP improves glucose homeostasis and beta-cell function in age-related glucose intolerance",
abstract = "in older populations there is significant increase in incidence of impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) improves glycemic control but its use as a therapeutic is hindered by short biological half-life. The present study examined effects of a longer-acting form of GIP, GIP[mPEG], on glucose homeostasis and beta-cell function in mice with age-related glucose intolerance. GIP[mPEG] decreased glucose and increased insulin concentrations when administered prior to a glucose challenge. Daily administration of GIP[mPEG] for 20 days had no effect on body weight and food intake. However, non-fasting glucose concentrations were decreased and insulin concentrations increased. Glycemic response to intraperitoneal glucose was improved and glucose-mediated insulin secretion enhanced. Insulin sensitivity, circulating triglycerides and resistin levels were unchanged by the treatment regimen, but plasma adiponectin levels increased. These data indicate that prolonged activation of the GIP receptor with GIP[mPEG] counters aspects of impaired beta-cell function and age-related glucose intolerance. (C) 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.",
author = "Kerr, {Barry D.} and Nigel Irwin and Peter Flatt and Victor Gault",
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T1 - Prolonged GIP receptor activation using stable mini-PEGylated GIP improves glucose homeostasis and beta-cell function in age-related glucose intolerance

AU - Kerr, Barry D.

AU - Irwin, Nigel

AU - Flatt, Peter

AU - Gault, Victor

PY - 2009/2

Y1 - 2009/2

N2 - in older populations there is significant increase in incidence of impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) improves glycemic control but its use as a therapeutic is hindered by short biological half-life. The present study examined effects of a longer-acting form of GIP, GIP[mPEG], on glucose homeostasis and beta-cell function in mice with age-related glucose intolerance. GIP[mPEG] decreased glucose and increased insulin concentrations when administered prior to a glucose challenge. Daily administration of GIP[mPEG] for 20 days had no effect on body weight and food intake. However, non-fasting glucose concentrations were decreased and insulin concentrations increased. Glycemic response to intraperitoneal glucose was improved and glucose-mediated insulin secretion enhanced. Insulin sensitivity, circulating triglycerides and resistin levels were unchanged by the treatment regimen, but plasma adiponectin levels increased. These data indicate that prolonged activation of the GIP receptor with GIP[mPEG] counters aspects of impaired beta-cell function and age-related glucose intolerance. (C) 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

AB - in older populations there is significant increase in incidence of impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) improves glycemic control but its use as a therapeutic is hindered by short biological half-life. The present study examined effects of a longer-acting form of GIP, GIP[mPEG], on glucose homeostasis and beta-cell function in mice with age-related glucose intolerance. GIP[mPEG] decreased glucose and increased insulin concentrations when administered prior to a glucose challenge. Daily administration of GIP[mPEG] for 20 days had no effect on body weight and food intake. However, non-fasting glucose concentrations were decreased and insulin concentrations increased. Glycemic response to intraperitoneal glucose was improved and glucose-mediated insulin secretion enhanced. Insulin sensitivity, circulating triglycerides and resistin levels were unchanged by the treatment regimen, but plasma adiponectin levels increased. These data indicate that prolonged activation of the GIP receptor with GIP[mPEG] counters aspects of impaired beta-cell function and age-related glucose intolerance. (C) 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

U2 - 10.1016/j.peptides.2008.10.017

DO - 10.1016/j.peptides.2008.10.017

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JO - Peptides

T2 - Peptides

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