Process simulations for wheat and wheat straw based ethanol biorefinery concepts

MA Ghayur, Ye Huang, D McIlveen-Wright, Neil Hewitt

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Bioconversion of wheat straw to ethanol is becoming an attractive alternative to ethanol production from conventional grain crops, especially with wheat straw being a low commercial value, high volume agricultural by-product and grain prices continuously increasing. Similarly, using wheat straw as energy source in the ethanol biorefinery has become a subject of interest in recent years. In this light, the aim of present work is to compare ethanol production from wheat grain and wheat straw for commercial scale plants. Using same configuration for the two feedstocks, change in ethanol and by-products’ outputs is simulated. The simulated biorefinery is based upon the established technologies within the bioethanol industry. In the two models same by-products are produced, namely: dried distillers grain solubles (DDGS), acetic acid, glycerol and furfural. Results show that 20% less ethanol is produced per ton for wheat stalk than when wheat grain is used.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the bioten conference on biomass, bioenergy and biofuels 2010
EditorsAV Bridgwater
Place of PublicationNewbury, UK
Pages146-152
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2011

Fingerprint

biorefining
wheat straw
ethanol
wheat
ethanol production
byproducts
bioethanol
furfural
distillers grains
biotransformation
grain crops
feedstocks
acetic acid
glycerol
industry
energy

Keywords

  • Biorefinery
  • Ethanol
  • Fermentation
  • Dry Grind Process

Cite this

Ghayur, MA., Huang, Y., McIlveen-Wright, D., & Hewitt, N. (2011). Process simulations for wheat and wheat straw based ethanol biorefinery concepts. In AV. Bridgwater (Ed.), Proceedings of the bioten conference on biomass, bioenergy and biofuels 2010 (pp. 146-152). Newbury, UK.
Ghayur, MA ; Huang, Ye ; McIlveen-Wright, D ; Hewitt, Neil. / Process simulations for wheat and wheat straw based ethanol biorefinery concepts. Proceedings of the bioten conference on biomass, bioenergy and biofuels 2010. editor / AV Bridgwater. Newbury, UK, 2011. pp. 146-152
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keywords = "Biorefinery, Ethanol, Fermentation, Dry Grind Process",
author = "MA Ghayur and Ye Huang and D McIlveen-Wright and Neil Hewitt",
note = "Reference text: [1] {"}BCyL Biomass Plant,{"} vol. 2010: Abengoa Bioenergy, 2008. Accessed 4 August 2010. http://www.abengoabioenergy.com/corp/web/en/nuevas_tecnologias/proyectos/planta_biomasa/index.html [2] {"}Annual Report, 2008,{"} vol. 2010: Abengoa Bioenergy, 2008. Accessed 4 August 2010. http://www.abengoabioenergy.com/corp/export/sites/bioenergy/resources/pdf/acerca_de/en/Annual_report_2008_1.pdf [3] {"}Not Your Father's Ethanol,{"} vol. 2010: Bloomberg Business Week, 21 Feb 2005. http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/05_08/b3921117.htm [4] {"}Chempolis starts up third-generation biorefinery for producing cellulosic ethanol,{"} vol. 2010: Chempolis, 2010. Accessed 3 August 2010 http://www.chempolis.com/news18.html [5] C. Du, G. M. Campbell, N. Misailidis, F. Mateos-Salvador, J. Sadhukhan, M. Mustafa, and R. M. Weightman, {"}Evaluating the feasibility of commercial arabinoxylan production in the context of a wheat biorefinery principally producing ethanol. Part 1. Experimental studies of arabinoxylan extraction from wheat bran,{"} Chemical Engineering Research and Design, vol. 9, pp. 1232-1238, 2009. [6] S. Gompertz, {"}Fuelled by compost bugs,{"} vol. 2010: BBC News, 25 Feb 2009. Accessed 4 August 2010. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/programmes/working_lunch/7911231.stm [7] C. N. Hamelinck, G. v. Hooijdonk, and A. P. Faaij, Ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass: techno-economic performance in short-, middle- and long-term, vol. 28. Kidlington, ROYAUME-UNI: Elsevier, 2005. [8] Y. Hemery, X. Rouau, C. Dragan, M. Bilici, R. Beleca, and L. Dascalescu, {"}Electrostatic properties of wheat bran and its constitutive layers: Influence of particle size, composition, and moisture content,{"} Journal of Food Engineering, vol. 93, pp. 114-124, 2009. [9] P. Kaparaju, M. Serrano, A. B. Thomsen, P. Kongjan, and I. Angelidaki, {"}Bioethanol, biohydrogen and biogas production from wheat straw in a biorefinery concept,{"} Bioresource Technology, vol. 100, pp. 2562-2568, 2009. [10] L. R. Lynd, {"}Overview and evaluation of fuel ethanol from cellulosic biomass: technology, economics, the environment, and policy,{"} Annual Review of Energy and the Environment, vol. 21, pp. 403-465, 1996. [11] N. Misailidis, G. M. Campbell, C. Du, J. Sadhukhan, M. Mustafa, F. Mateos-Salvador, and R. M. Weightman, {"}Evaluating the feasibility of commercial arabinoxylan production in the context of a wheat biorefinery principally producing ethanol: Part 2. Process simulation and economic analysis,{"} Chemical Engineering Research and Design, vol. 87, pp. 1239-1250, 2009. [12] D. Montane, X. Farriol, J. Salvado, P. Jollez, and E. Chornet, {"}Application of steam explosion to the fractionation and rapid vapor-phase alkaline pulping of wheat straw,{"} Biomass and Bioenergy, vol. 14, pp. 261-276, 1998. [13] {"}Phyllis, database for biomass and waste,{"} Phyllis. Accessed 2010 http://www.ecn.nl/phyllis/ [14] J. Randerson, {"}Compost bug offers hope for biofuel industry,{"} vol. 2010: Guardian, 15 Aug 2008. Accessed 3 Aug 2010. http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2008/aug/15/biofuels.renewableenergy",
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Ghayur, MA, Huang, Y, McIlveen-Wright, D & Hewitt, N 2011, Process simulations for wheat and wheat straw based ethanol biorefinery concepts. in AV Bridgwater (ed.), Proceedings of the bioten conference on biomass, bioenergy and biofuels 2010. Newbury, UK, pp. 146-152.

Process simulations for wheat and wheat straw based ethanol biorefinery concepts. / Ghayur, MA; Huang, Ye; McIlveen-Wright, D; Hewitt, Neil.

Proceedings of the bioten conference on biomass, bioenergy and biofuels 2010. ed. / AV Bridgwater. Newbury, UK, 2011. p. 146-152.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

TY - CHAP

T1 - Process simulations for wheat and wheat straw based ethanol biorefinery concepts

AU - Ghayur, MA

AU - Huang, Ye

AU - McIlveen-Wright, D

AU - Hewitt, Neil

N1 - Reference text: [1] "BCyL Biomass Plant," vol. 2010: Abengoa Bioenergy, 2008. Accessed 4 August 2010. http://www.abengoabioenergy.com/corp/web/en/nuevas_tecnologias/proyectos/planta_biomasa/index.html [2] "Annual Report, 2008," vol. 2010: Abengoa Bioenergy, 2008. Accessed 4 August 2010. http://www.abengoabioenergy.com/corp/export/sites/bioenergy/resources/pdf/acerca_de/en/Annual_report_2008_1.pdf [3] "Not Your Father's Ethanol," vol. 2010: Bloomberg Business Week, 21 Feb 2005. http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/05_08/b3921117.htm [4] "Chempolis starts up third-generation biorefinery for producing cellulosic ethanol," vol. 2010: Chempolis, 2010. Accessed 3 August 2010 http://www.chempolis.com/news18.html [5] C. Du, G. M. Campbell, N. Misailidis, F. Mateos-Salvador, J. Sadhukhan, M. Mustafa, and R. M. Weightman, "Evaluating the feasibility of commercial arabinoxylan production in the context of a wheat biorefinery principally producing ethanol. Part 1. Experimental studies of arabinoxylan extraction from wheat bran," Chemical Engineering Research and Design, vol. 9, pp. 1232-1238, 2009. [6] S. Gompertz, "Fuelled by compost bugs," vol. 2010: BBC News, 25 Feb 2009. Accessed 4 August 2010. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/programmes/working_lunch/7911231.stm [7] C. N. Hamelinck, G. v. Hooijdonk, and A. P. Faaij, Ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass: techno-economic performance in short-, middle- and long-term, vol. 28. Kidlington, ROYAUME-UNI: Elsevier, 2005. [8] Y. Hemery, X. Rouau, C. Dragan, M. Bilici, R. Beleca, and L. Dascalescu, "Electrostatic properties of wheat bran and its constitutive layers: Influence of particle size, composition, and moisture content," Journal of Food Engineering, vol. 93, pp. 114-124, 2009. [9] P. Kaparaju, M. Serrano, A. B. Thomsen, P. Kongjan, and I. Angelidaki, "Bioethanol, biohydrogen and biogas production from wheat straw in a biorefinery concept," Bioresource Technology, vol. 100, pp. 2562-2568, 2009. [10] L. R. Lynd, "Overview and evaluation of fuel ethanol from cellulosic biomass: technology, economics, the environment, and policy," Annual Review of Energy and the Environment, vol. 21, pp. 403-465, 1996. [11] N. Misailidis, G. M. Campbell, C. Du, J. Sadhukhan, M. Mustafa, F. Mateos-Salvador, and R. M. Weightman, "Evaluating the feasibility of commercial arabinoxylan production in the context of a wheat biorefinery principally producing ethanol: Part 2. Process simulation and economic analysis," Chemical Engineering Research and Design, vol. 87, pp. 1239-1250, 2009. [12] D. Montane, X. Farriol, J. Salvado, P. Jollez, and E. Chornet, "Application of steam explosion to the fractionation and rapid vapor-phase alkaline pulping of wheat straw," Biomass and Bioenergy, vol. 14, pp. 261-276, 1998. [13] "Phyllis, database for biomass and waste," Phyllis. Accessed 2010 http://www.ecn.nl/phyllis/ [14] J. Randerson, "Compost bug offers hope for biofuel industry," vol. 2010: Guardian, 15 Aug 2008. Accessed 3 Aug 2010. http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2008/aug/15/biofuels.renewableenergy

PY - 2011/10/1

Y1 - 2011/10/1

N2 - Bioconversion of wheat straw to ethanol is becoming an attractive alternative to ethanol production from conventional grain crops, especially with wheat straw being a low commercial value, high volume agricultural by-product and grain prices continuously increasing. Similarly, using wheat straw as energy source in the ethanol biorefinery has become a subject of interest in recent years. In this light, the aim of present work is to compare ethanol production from wheat grain and wheat straw for commercial scale plants. Using same configuration for the two feedstocks, change in ethanol and by-products’ outputs is simulated. The simulated biorefinery is based upon the established technologies within the bioethanol industry. In the two models same by-products are produced, namely: dried distillers grain solubles (DDGS), acetic acid, glycerol and furfural. Results show that 20% less ethanol is produced per ton for wheat stalk than when wheat grain is used.

AB - Bioconversion of wheat straw to ethanol is becoming an attractive alternative to ethanol production from conventional grain crops, especially with wheat straw being a low commercial value, high volume agricultural by-product and grain prices continuously increasing. Similarly, using wheat straw as energy source in the ethanol biorefinery has become a subject of interest in recent years. In this light, the aim of present work is to compare ethanol production from wheat grain and wheat straw for commercial scale plants. Using same configuration for the two feedstocks, change in ethanol and by-products’ outputs is simulated. The simulated biorefinery is based upon the established technologies within the bioethanol industry. In the two models same by-products are produced, namely: dried distillers grain solubles (DDGS), acetic acid, glycerol and furfural. Results show that 20% less ethanol is produced per ton for wheat stalk than when wheat grain is used.

KW - Biorefinery

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KW - Fermentation

KW - Dry Grind Process

M3 - Chapter

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EP - 152

BT - Proceedings of the bioten conference on biomass, bioenergy and biofuels 2010

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CY - Newbury, UK

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Ghayur MA, Huang Y, McIlveen-Wright D, Hewitt N. Process simulations for wheat and wheat straw based ethanol biorefinery concepts. In Bridgwater AV, editor, Proceedings of the bioten conference on biomass, bioenergy and biofuels 2010. Newbury, UK. 2011. p. 146-152