Process design for CO2 absorption from syngas using physical solvent DMEPEG

Ashok Dave, Medha Dave, Ye Huang, Sina Rezvani, Neil Hewitt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Pre-combustion IGCC is one of the leading technologies having potential for effective control of green-house gas emission. Process design for CO2Capture from power plant is becoming increasingly importantin the past decades in view of the need for optimization of Capital Cost and Utility consumption. Inthis article, a configuration of the process design for CO2absorption using physical solvent DMEPEG isproposed, which is described using the process flow diagram (PFD) and the Flowsheet. CO2absorptionperformance of DMEPEG solvent is assessed based on a rate based mass transfer model using ProTreat®simulation software. The rate based mass transfer simulation by ProTreat software adds to the reliabilityof the simulation result (as evident by its acceptance within industry). The trade-off between H2recovery(by syngas recycle) and CO2re-absorption is described which reveals that more than 55% H2recoverymay significantly increase the load on the system (in terms of syngas processing and CO2re-absorption).Objective of this research is to develop a detailed process model for CO2absorption by DMEPEG solvent(to enable detailed techno-economic assessment by bottom up approach). In the second section of thisarticle, the process of CO2capture by physical solvent DMEPEG is explained. In the fourth section, theboundary conditions such as the inlet pressure, temperature and composition of syngas and solvent feedare defined. In the fourth and fifth section, the design and performance of the packed tower is describedand the utility consumption is estimated. Moreover, the outlet condition of the solvent is described andits saturation (by CO2) is estimated. In the fourth section, the strategy of solvent heating to recycle thesyngas to CO2absorber (for H2recovery) is described. Importance of CO2 absorption in solvent (at highconcentration) for minimization of equipment size and utility consumption for CO2 capture is explained. Using RSR packing (6.4 m Dia., 16 m Ht. (9 + 6 + 1)) results in 90.7% CO2absorption and 89% saturationof CO2dissolved in DMEPEG solvent. Out of 3.34 kmol/s H2fed to the CO2Absorber (as part of syngas),1.464% (equivalent 5.9 MW power generation by Gas Turbine in open cycle) is co-absorbed (along withCO2) in DMEPEG solvent. Out of this co-absorbed H2, 55.7% is recovered which is equivalent to 3.267 MWPower Generation.In terms of hydraulic design, the CO2 Absorber using RSR packing operating at 72.5% flood conditionresults in packing pressure drop of 87.5 Pa/m (1.4 kPa). Packed section diameter and height is suggestedfor various random packing materials (tower internal) to achieve almost comparable gas absorption performance.
LanguageEnglish
Pages436-448
JournalInternational Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control
Volume49
Early online date8 Apr 2016
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 8 Apr 2016

Fingerprint

Process design
Towers
mass transfer
Mass transfer
simulation
software
Gas absorption
bottom-up approach
Flowcharting
pressure drop
Gas emissions
power generation
gas
Greenhouse gases
turbine
trade-off
Pressure drop
Power generation
Gas turbines
power plant

Keywords

  • Acid gas removal
  • Carbon capture and storage
  • Carbon dioxide absorption
  • Dmepeg
  • Hydrogen recovery
  • Process simulation
  • Rate-based mass transfer simulation
  • Selective Absorption/Desorption

Cite this

Dave, Ashok ; Dave, Medha ; Huang, Ye ; Rezvani, Sina ; Hewitt, Neil. / Process design for CO2 absorption from syngas using physical solvent DMEPEG. 2016 ; Vol. 49. pp. 436-448.
@article{8f11d04d50cf4d5e8e910aa65a142d52,
title = "Process design for CO2 absorption from syngas using physical solvent DMEPEG",
abstract = "Pre-combustion IGCC is one of the leading technologies having potential for effective control of green-house gas emission. Process design for CO2Capture from power plant is becoming increasingly importantin the past decades in view of the need for optimization of Capital Cost and Utility consumption. Inthis article, a configuration of the process design for CO2absorption using physical solvent DMEPEG isproposed, which is described using the process flow diagram (PFD) and the Flowsheet. CO2absorptionperformance of DMEPEG solvent is assessed based on a rate based mass transfer model using ProTreat{\circledR}simulation software. The rate based mass transfer simulation by ProTreat software adds to the reliabilityof the simulation result (as evident by its acceptance within industry). The trade-off between H2recovery(by syngas recycle) and CO2re-absorption is described which reveals that more than 55{\%} H2recoverymay significantly increase the load on the system (in terms of syngas processing and CO2re-absorption).Objective of this research is to develop a detailed process model for CO2absorption by DMEPEG solvent(to enable detailed techno-economic assessment by bottom up approach). In the second section of thisarticle, the process of CO2capture by physical solvent DMEPEG is explained. In the fourth section, theboundary conditions such as the inlet pressure, temperature and composition of syngas and solvent feedare defined. In the fourth and fifth section, the design and performance of the packed tower is describedand the utility consumption is estimated. Moreover, the outlet condition of the solvent is described andits saturation (by CO2) is estimated. In the fourth section, the strategy of solvent heating to recycle thesyngas to CO2absorber (for H2recovery) is described. Importance of CO2 absorption in solvent (at highconcentration) for minimization of equipment size and utility consumption for CO2 capture is explained. Using RSR packing (6.4 m Dia., 16 m Ht. (9 + 6 + 1)) results in 90.7{\%} CO2absorption and 89{\%} saturationof CO2dissolved in DMEPEG solvent. Out of 3.34 kmol/s H2fed to the CO2Absorber (as part of syngas),1.464{\%} (equivalent 5.9 MW power generation by Gas Turbine in open cycle) is co-absorbed (along withCO2) in DMEPEG solvent. Out of this co-absorbed H2, 55.7{\%} is recovered which is equivalent to 3.267 MWPower Generation.In terms of hydraulic design, the CO2 Absorber using RSR packing operating at 72.5{\%} flood conditionresults in packing pressure drop of 87.5 Pa/m (1.4 kPa). Packed section diameter and height is suggestedfor various random packing materials (tower internal) to achieve almost comparable gas absorption performance.",
keywords = "Acid gas removal, Carbon capture and storage, Carbon dioxide absorption, Dmepeg, Hydrogen recovery, Process simulation, Rate-based mass transfer simulation, Selective Absorption/Desorption",
author = "Ashok Dave and Medha Dave and Ye Huang and Sina Rezvani and Neil Hewitt",
note = "Reference text: 1 SIEMENS Gas Turbine Model SGT 5 4000F http://www.energy.siemens.com/hq/en/fossil-power-generation/gas-turbines/sgt5-4000f.htm#content=Technical{\%}20data. 2 “UOP SelexolTM Technology for Acid Gas Removal”, http://www.uop.com/?document=uop-selexol-technology-for-acid-gas-removal&download=1. 3 “Meeting Staged CO2 Capture Requirements with the UOP SELEXOL™ Process”, http://www.uop.com/?document=meeting-staged-co2-capture-requirements-with-uop-selexol&download=1. 4 “UOP SelexolTM Technology Applications for CO2 Capture”, 3rd Annual Wyoming CO2 Conference, http://www.uwyo.edu/eori/_files/co2conference09/mike{\%}20clark{\%}20revised{\%}20selexol_wyoming_conference.pdf. 5 Curtis Sharp (UOP, LLC), Daniel Kubek (UOP, LLC), Douglas Kuper (UOP, LLC), Michael Clark (UOP, LLC), Maurizio Di Dio (UOP, LLC), “Recent SelexolTM Operating Experience with Gasification including CO2 Capture”, 20th Annual International Pittsburgh Coal Conference, September 15, 2003 http://www.clean-energy.us/document.asp?document=315. 6 “Solubility of Hydrogen Sulfide, Sulfur Dioxide, Carbon Dioxide, Propane, and n‐Butane in Poly(glycol ethers), Sciamanna, S.F., Lynn, S., Ind. Eng. Chem. Res. 1988, 27, 492–499. 7 “Carbon Dioxide Removal and Recovery New Polyglycol Ether Processes”, Greene P.A., and Kutsher, Proceedings of the 1965 Laurance Reid Gas Conditioning Conference, Norman OK. 8 “Low‐Volatility Polar Organic Solvents for Sulfur Dioxide, Hydrogen Sulfide, and Carbonyl Sulfide”, Hartel, G.H., J. Chem. Eng. Data 1985, 30, 57–6. 9 “High CO2–High H2S Removal with SELEXOL Solvent”, Sweny, J.W., Proceedings of the 59th Annual Gas Processors Association Convention, pp.163–166. 10 “Measurement and Modeling of the CO2 Solubility in Poly(ethylene glycol) of Different Molecular Weights”, Aionicesei, E., Skerget, M., Knez, Z., J. Chem. Eng. Data, 2008, 53, pp. 185–188. 11 Yuming Xu, Richard P Schutte and Loren Hepler, “Solubilities of Carbon Dioxide, Hydrogen Sulfide and Sulfur Dioxide in Physical Solvents”, The Canadian Journal of Chemical Engineering, Volume 70, June 1992, pp 569–573. 12 Kapetaki, Z, Brandani, P, Brandani, S & Ahn, H 2015, “Process Simulation of a Dual-Stage Selexol Process for 95{\%} Carbon Capture Efficiency at an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Power Plant” International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control, vol 39, pp. 17–26., 10.1016/j.ijggc.2015.04.0. 13 “Solubilities of Carbon Dioxide, Hydrogen Sulfide and Sulfur Dioxide in Physical Solvents”, Yuming Xu, Richard P Schutte and Loren Hepler, The Canadian Journal of Chemical Engineering, Volume 70, June 1992, pp 569–573. 14 “The solubility of CO2, N2 and H2 in a mixture of dimethylether polyethylene glycols at high pressures”, Ioan Gainar, Gheorghe Aniteschu, Fluid Phase Equilibria, 109 (1995), pp 281–289. 15 “Solubilities of Carbon Dioxide in Polyethylene Glycol Ethers”, Amr Henni, Paiton Tontiwachwuthikul and Amit Chakma, The Canadian Journal of Chemical Engineering, Volume 83, April 2005, pp 358–361. 16 ProTreat software for rate-based mass-transfer simulation from Optimized Gas Treatment (OGT), USA. www.ogtrt.com. 17 PETROLEUM TECHNOLOGY QUARTERLY, Q2 2009 http://www.digitalrefining.com/data/digital_magazines/file/1767276991.pdf. 18 Publications from Optimized Gas Treatment Inc., USA. http://ogtrt.com/information/publications. 19 La Barge, Wyoming plant of ExxonMobil as reported by Johnson and Homme (1984). 20 “The CONTACTOR”, Volume 4, Issue 1, 2010, published quarterly by Optimized Gas Treating, Inc. 21 “Comparison and validation of simulation codes against sixteen sets of data from four different pilot plants”, Energy Procedia 1 (2009) 1249–1256 by X Luo et al. 22 DR. M. KARMARKAR, J.GRIFFITHS, R.DELANEY, “IMPACT OF CO2 REMOVAL ON COAL GASIFICATION BASED FUEL PLANTS”, C/08/00392/00/00, URN 09/751 Job No: 60845900, JACOB Consultancy, February 2006 http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/+/http://www.berr.gov.uk/files/file50837.pdf. 23 Nikolai Kolev, Svetoslav Nakov, Ljutzkan Ljutzkanov, Dimitar Kolev, Institute of Chemical Engineering, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev St., Bl.103, 1113 Sofia, Bulgaria “COMPARISON OF THE EFFECTIVE SURFACE AREA OF SOME HIGHLY EFFECTIVE RANDOM PACKINGS THIRD AND FORTH GENERATION”, SYMPOSIUM SERIES NO. 152, IChemE 2006 http://www.nt.ntnu.no/users/skoge/prost/proceedings/distillation06/CD-proceedings/paper073.pdf.",
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month = "4",
day = "8",
doi = "10.1016/j.ijggc.2016.03.015",
language = "English",
volume = "49",
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}

Process design for CO2 absorption from syngas using physical solvent DMEPEG. / Dave, Ashok; Dave, Medha; Huang, Ye; Rezvani, Sina; Hewitt, Neil.

Vol. 49, 08.04.2016, p. 436-448.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Process design for CO2 absorption from syngas using physical solvent DMEPEG

AU - Dave, Ashok

AU - Dave, Medha

AU - Huang, Ye

AU - Rezvani, Sina

AU - Hewitt, Neil

N1 - Reference text: 1 SIEMENS Gas Turbine Model SGT 5 4000F http://www.energy.siemens.com/hq/en/fossil-power-generation/gas-turbines/sgt5-4000f.htm#content=Technical%20data. 2 “UOP SelexolTM Technology for Acid Gas Removal”, http://www.uop.com/?document=uop-selexol-technology-for-acid-gas-removal&download=1. 3 “Meeting Staged CO2 Capture Requirements with the UOP SELEXOL™ Process”, http://www.uop.com/?document=meeting-staged-co2-capture-requirements-with-uop-selexol&download=1. 4 “UOP SelexolTM Technology Applications for CO2 Capture”, 3rd Annual Wyoming CO2 Conference, http://www.uwyo.edu/eori/_files/co2conference09/mike%20clark%20revised%20selexol_wyoming_conference.pdf. 5 Curtis Sharp (UOP, LLC), Daniel Kubek (UOP, LLC), Douglas Kuper (UOP, LLC), Michael Clark (UOP, LLC), Maurizio Di Dio (UOP, LLC), “Recent SelexolTM Operating Experience with Gasification including CO2 Capture”, 20th Annual International Pittsburgh Coal Conference, September 15, 2003 http://www.clean-energy.us/document.asp?document=315. 6 “Solubility of Hydrogen Sulfide, Sulfur Dioxide, Carbon Dioxide, Propane, and n‐Butane in Poly(glycol ethers), Sciamanna, S.F., Lynn, S., Ind. Eng. Chem. Res. 1988, 27, 492–499. 7 “Carbon Dioxide Removal and Recovery New Polyglycol Ether Processes”, Greene P.A., and Kutsher, Proceedings of the 1965 Laurance Reid Gas Conditioning Conference, Norman OK. 8 “Low‐Volatility Polar Organic Solvents for Sulfur Dioxide, Hydrogen Sulfide, and Carbonyl Sulfide”, Hartel, G.H., J. Chem. Eng. Data 1985, 30, 57–6. 9 “High CO2–High H2S Removal with SELEXOL Solvent”, Sweny, J.W., Proceedings of the 59th Annual Gas Processors Association Convention, pp.163–166. 10 “Measurement and Modeling of the CO2 Solubility in Poly(ethylene glycol) of Different Molecular Weights”, Aionicesei, E., Skerget, M., Knez, Z., J. Chem. Eng. Data, 2008, 53, pp. 185–188. 11 Yuming Xu, Richard P Schutte and Loren Hepler, “Solubilities of Carbon Dioxide, Hydrogen Sulfide and Sulfur Dioxide in Physical Solvents”, The Canadian Journal of Chemical Engineering, Volume 70, June 1992, pp 569–573. 12 Kapetaki, Z, Brandani, P, Brandani, S & Ahn, H 2015, “Process Simulation of a Dual-Stage Selexol Process for 95% Carbon Capture Efficiency at an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Power Plant” International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control, vol 39, pp. 17–26., 10.1016/j.ijggc.2015.04.0. 13 “Solubilities of Carbon Dioxide, Hydrogen Sulfide and Sulfur Dioxide in Physical Solvents”, Yuming Xu, Richard P Schutte and Loren Hepler, The Canadian Journal of Chemical Engineering, Volume 70, June 1992, pp 569–573. 14 “The solubility of CO2, N2 and H2 in a mixture of dimethylether polyethylene glycols at high pressures”, Ioan Gainar, Gheorghe Aniteschu, Fluid Phase Equilibria, 109 (1995), pp 281–289. 15 “Solubilities of Carbon Dioxide in Polyethylene Glycol Ethers”, Amr Henni, Paiton Tontiwachwuthikul and Amit Chakma, The Canadian Journal of Chemical Engineering, Volume 83, April 2005, pp 358–361. 16 ProTreat software for rate-based mass-transfer simulation from Optimized Gas Treatment (OGT), USA. www.ogtrt.com. 17 PETROLEUM TECHNOLOGY QUARTERLY, Q2 2009 http://www.digitalrefining.com/data/digital_magazines/file/1767276991.pdf. 18 Publications from Optimized Gas Treatment Inc., USA. http://ogtrt.com/information/publications. 19 La Barge, Wyoming plant of ExxonMobil as reported by Johnson and Homme (1984). 20 “The CONTACTOR”, Volume 4, Issue 1, 2010, published quarterly by Optimized Gas Treating, Inc. 21 “Comparison and validation of simulation codes against sixteen sets of data from four different pilot plants”, Energy Procedia 1 (2009) 1249–1256 by X Luo et al. 22 DR. M. KARMARKAR, J.GRIFFITHS, R.DELANEY, “IMPACT OF CO2 REMOVAL ON COAL GASIFICATION BASED FUEL PLANTS”, C/08/00392/00/00, URN 09/751 Job No: 60845900, JACOB Consultancy, February 2006 http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/+/http://www.berr.gov.uk/files/file50837.pdf. 23 Nikolai Kolev, Svetoslav Nakov, Ljutzkan Ljutzkanov, Dimitar Kolev, Institute of Chemical Engineering, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev St., Bl.103, 1113 Sofia, Bulgaria “COMPARISON OF THE EFFECTIVE SURFACE AREA OF SOME HIGHLY EFFECTIVE RANDOM PACKINGS THIRD AND FORTH GENERATION”, SYMPOSIUM SERIES NO. 152, IChemE 2006 http://www.nt.ntnu.no/users/skoge/prost/proceedings/distillation06/CD-proceedings/paper073.pdf.

PY - 2016/4/8

Y1 - 2016/4/8

N2 - Pre-combustion IGCC is one of the leading technologies having potential for effective control of green-house gas emission. Process design for CO2Capture from power plant is becoming increasingly importantin the past decades in view of the need for optimization of Capital Cost and Utility consumption. Inthis article, a configuration of the process design for CO2absorption using physical solvent DMEPEG isproposed, which is described using the process flow diagram (PFD) and the Flowsheet. CO2absorptionperformance of DMEPEG solvent is assessed based on a rate based mass transfer model using ProTreat®simulation software. The rate based mass transfer simulation by ProTreat software adds to the reliabilityof the simulation result (as evident by its acceptance within industry). The trade-off between H2recovery(by syngas recycle) and CO2re-absorption is described which reveals that more than 55% H2recoverymay significantly increase the load on the system (in terms of syngas processing and CO2re-absorption).Objective of this research is to develop a detailed process model for CO2absorption by DMEPEG solvent(to enable detailed techno-economic assessment by bottom up approach). In the second section of thisarticle, the process of CO2capture by physical solvent DMEPEG is explained. In the fourth section, theboundary conditions such as the inlet pressure, temperature and composition of syngas and solvent feedare defined. In the fourth and fifth section, the design and performance of the packed tower is describedand the utility consumption is estimated. Moreover, the outlet condition of the solvent is described andits saturation (by CO2) is estimated. In the fourth section, the strategy of solvent heating to recycle thesyngas to CO2absorber (for H2recovery) is described. Importance of CO2 absorption in solvent (at highconcentration) for minimization of equipment size and utility consumption for CO2 capture is explained. Using RSR packing (6.4 m Dia., 16 m Ht. (9 + 6 + 1)) results in 90.7% CO2absorption and 89% saturationof CO2dissolved in DMEPEG solvent. Out of 3.34 kmol/s H2fed to the CO2Absorber (as part of syngas),1.464% (equivalent 5.9 MW power generation by Gas Turbine in open cycle) is co-absorbed (along withCO2) in DMEPEG solvent. Out of this co-absorbed H2, 55.7% is recovered which is equivalent to 3.267 MWPower Generation.In terms of hydraulic design, the CO2 Absorber using RSR packing operating at 72.5% flood conditionresults in packing pressure drop of 87.5 Pa/m (1.4 kPa). Packed section diameter and height is suggestedfor various random packing materials (tower internal) to achieve almost comparable gas absorption performance.

AB - Pre-combustion IGCC is one of the leading technologies having potential for effective control of green-house gas emission. Process design for CO2Capture from power plant is becoming increasingly importantin the past decades in view of the need for optimization of Capital Cost and Utility consumption. Inthis article, a configuration of the process design for CO2absorption using physical solvent DMEPEG isproposed, which is described using the process flow diagram (PFD) and the Flowsheet. CO2absorptionperformance of DMEPEG solvent is assessed based on a rate based mass transfer model using ProTreat®simulation software. The rate based mass transfer simulation by ProTreat software adds to the reliabilityof the simulation result (as evident by its acceptance within industry). The trade-off between H2recovery(by syngas recycle) and CO2re-absorption is described which reveals that more than 55% H2recoverymay significantly increase the load on the system (in terms of syngas processing and CO2re-absorption).Objective of this research is to develop a detailed process model for CO2absorption by DMEPEG solvent(to enable detailed techno-economic assessment by bottom up approach). In the second section of thisarticle, the process of CO2capture by physical solvent DMEPEG is explained. In the fourth section, theboundary conditions such as the inlet pressure, temperature and composition of syngas and solvent feedare defined. In the fourth and fifth section, the design and performance of the packed tower is describedand the utility consumption is estimated. Moreover, the outlet condition of the solvent is described andits saturation (by CO2) is estimated. In the fourth section, the strategy of solvent heating to recycle thesyngas to CO2absorber (for H2recovery) is described. Importance of CO2 absorption in solvent (at highconcentration) for minimization of equipment size and utility consumption for CO2 capture is explained. Using RSR packing (6.4 m Dia., 16 m Ht. (9 + 6 + 1)) results in 90.7% CO2absorption and 89% saturationof CO2dissolved in DMEPEG solvent. Out of 3.34 kmol/s H2fed to the CO2Absorber (as part of syngas),1.464% (equivalent 5.9 MW power generation by Gas Turbine in open cycle) is co-absorbed (along withCO2) in DMEPEG solvent. Out of this co-absorbed H2, 55.7% is recovered which is equivalent to 3.267 MWPower Generation.In terms of hydraulic design, the CO2 Absorber using RSR packing operating at 72.5% flood conditionresults in packing pressure drop of 87.5 Pa/m (1.4 kPa). Packed section diameter and height is suggestedfor various random packing materials (tower internal) to achieve almost comparable gas absorption performance.

KW - Acid gas removal

KW - Carbon capture and storage

KW - Carbon dioxide absorption

KW - Dmepeg

KW - Hydrogen recovery

KW - Process simulation

KW - Rate-based mass transfer simulation

KW - Selective Absorption/Desorption

UR - http://authors.elsevier.com/a/1T3lv6E2M2cMYN

U2 - 10.1016/j.ijggc.2016.03.015

DO - 10.1016/j.ijggc.2016.03.015

M3 - Article

VL - 49

SP - 436

EP - 448

ER -