Preterm birth and prescriptions for cardiovascular, antiseizure, antibiotics and antiasthmatic medication in children up to 10 years of age: A population-based data linkage cohort study across six European regions

Mads Damkjær, Maria Loane, Stine Urhøj, Elisa Ballardini,, Caverao-carbonell clara, Alessio Coi, Laura García-Villodre, Joanne Given, Mika Gissler, Anna Heino, Sue Jordan, Amanda Neville, Anna Pierini, Joachim Tan, Ieuan Scanlon, Ester Garne, Joan K Morris

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Abstract

Objectives: Preterm children are exposed to many medications in neonatal intensive care units, but little is known about the effect of prematurity on medication use throughout infancy and childhood. We examined prescriptions of cardiovascular medication (CVM), anti-seizure medication (ASM), anti-asthmatic medication and antibiotics issued/dispensed in the first 10 years of life for very and moderately preterm children compared to term.
Design: Population-based data linkage cohort study linking information from birth records to prescription records.
Setting: Six registries from five countries in the EUROlinkCAT study.
Participants: The study population included 1,722,912 children, of whom 10,820 (0.6%) were very preterm (Main outcome measures Relative risk (RR) of receiving a prescription for CVM, ASM, antiasthmatic and antibiotics.
Results Very preterm children had a higher RR of receiving a prescription for CVM and ASM than preterm children. For all preterm children, the RR of having a CVM prescription was 3.58 (95% CI 2.06 to 6.23); 2.06 (95% CI 1.73 to 2.41) for ASM; 1.13 (95% CI 0.99 to 1.29) for antiasthmatics and 0.96 (95% CI 0.93 to 0.99) for antibiotics in the first year of life. Increased prescription of CVM, ASM and antiasthmatics persisted for all 10 years of follow-up. Although the RR was highest for CVM and ASM, in absolute numbers more children received prescriptions for antibiotics (42.34%, 95% CI 38.81% to 45.91%) and antiasthmatics (28.40%, 95% CI 16.07% to 42.649%) than for CVM (0.18%, 95% CI 0.12% to 0.25%) and ASM (0.16%, 95% CI 0.13% to 0.20%) in the first year of life.
Conclusion Preterm children had a higher risk of being prescribed/dispensed CVM, ASM and antiasthmatics up to age 10. This study highlights a need for further research into morbidity beyond age 10.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages11
JournalBMJ Open
Volume12
Issue number10
Early online date17 Oct 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished (in print/issue) - 17 Oct 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No. 733001. The views presented here are those of the authors only, and the European Commission is not responsible for any use that may be made of the information presented here.

Publisher Copyright:
© Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2022. Re-use permitted under CC BY-NC. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.

Keywords

  • Other Medical and Health Sciences
  • Public Health and Health Services
  • Clinical Sciences
  • Congenital heart disease
  • NEONATOLOGY
  • Public Health
  • Premature Birth
  • Anti-Asthmatic Agents
  • Humans
  • Information Storage and Retrieval
  • Neonatology
  • Drug Prescriptions
  • Anti-Bacterial Agents
  • Female
  • Child
  • Infant, Newborn
  • Cohort Studies
  • Public health
  • Premature Birth/epidemiology
  • Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use

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