Predicting Student-Athlete and Non-Athletes’ Intentions to Self-Manage Mental Health: Testing an Integrated Behaviour Change Model

Stephen Shannon, Gavin Breslin, Tandy Haughey, Nyasha Sarju, Drew Neill, Martin Lawlor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The objective of this study was to assess the factorial and predictive validity of an Integrated Behaviour Change (IBC) model (Hagger & Chatzarantis, 2014) for predicting Higher Education (HE) student-athlete and non-athletes’ intentions to self-manage mental health. Students (n = 200) aged 21.10 (SD= 3.73; male = 53%; athlete =69%) completed a questionnaire, and a two-step model building approach was conducted (i.e. confirmatory factor [CFA] and path analysis). Demographic (i.e. female or male; athlete or non-athlete) and IBC (i.e. autonomous and controlled motivation, subjective norms, perceived behavioural control and attitudes) variables were specified as predictors of students’ intentions to self-manage mental health. The factorial validity of the IBC was supported through models achieving satisfactory fit indices. Further, the path model explained a significant proportion of the variance for self-management intentions (R2 = 0.30). Autonomous (β = 0.29) and controlled (β = 0.13) motivation, alongside perceived behavioural control (β = 0.12) and gender (i.e. female; β = 0.12) predicted better self-management intentions. Autonomous motivation also positively predicted attitudes (β = 0.42), subjective norms (β = 0.32) and perceived behavioural control (β = 0.15). The promotion of autonomous motives and enhanced perceived behavioural control may offer the opportunity to facilitate effective self-management of mental health among students. Those involved in designing interventions may consider integrating the IBC for mental health promotion, tailoring interventions to gender and athlete norms.
LanguageEnglish
Pages92-99
Number of pages8
JournalMental Health & Prevention
Volume13
Early online date17 Jan 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 Mar 2019

Fingerprint

Athletes
Mental Health
Self Care
Students
Motivation
Health Promotion
Statistical Factor Analysis
Demography
Education

Keywords

  • Health
  • Psychology
  • Sport
  • Wellness

Cite this

@article{29c2a039a61444d2bab1c8d74ecec206,
title = "Predicting Student-Athlete and Non-Athletes’ Intentions to Self-Manage Mental Health: Testing an Integrated Behaviour Change Model",
abstract = "The objective of this study was to assess the factorial and predictive validity of an Integrated Behaviour Change (IBC) model (Hagger & Chatzarantis, 2014) for predicting Higher Education (HE) student-athlete and non-athletes’ intentions to self-manage mental health. Students (n = 200) aged 21.10 (SD= 3.73; male = 53{\%}; athlete =69{\%}) completed a questionnaire, and a two-step model building approach was conducted (i.e. confirmatory factor [CFA] and path analysis). Demographic (i.e. female or male; athlete or non-athlete) and IBC (i.e. autonomous and controlled motivation, subjective norms, perceived behavioural control and attitudes) variables were specified as predictors of students’ intentions to self-manage mental health. The factorial validity of the IBC was supported through models achieving satisfactory fit indices. Further, the path model explained a significant proportion of the variance for self-management intentions (R2 = 0.30). Autonomous (β = 0.29) and controlled (β = 0.13) motivation, alongside perceived behavioural control (β = 0.12) and gender (i.e. female; β = 0.12) predicted better self-management intentions. Autonomous motivation also positively predicted attitudes (β = 0.42), subjective norms (β = 0.32) and perceived behavioural control (β = 0.15). The promotion of autonomous motives and enhanced perceived behavioural control may offer the opportunity to facilitate effective self-management of mental health among students. Those involved in designing interventions may consider integrating the IBC for mental health promotion, tailoring interventions to gender and athlete norms.",
keywords = "Health, Psychology, Sport, Wellness",
author = "Stephen Shannon and Gavin Breslin and Tandy Haughey and Nyasha Sarju and Drew Neill and Martin Lawlor",
year = "2019",
month = "3",
day = "31",
doi = "10.1016/j.mhp.2019.01.006",
language = "English",
volume = "13",
pages = "92--99",
journal = "Mental Health & Prevention",
issn = "2212-6570",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Predicting Student-Athlete and Non-Athletes’ Intentions to Self-Manage Mental Health: Testing an Integrated Behaviour Change Model

AU - Shannon, Stephen

AU - Breslin, Gavin

AU - Haughey, Tandy

AU - Sarju, Nyasha

AU - Neill, Drew

AU - Lawlor, Martin

PY - 2019/3/31

Y1 - 2019/3/31

N2 - The objective of this study was to assess the factorial and predictive validity of an Integrated Behaviour Change (IBC) model (Hagger & Chatzarantis, 2014) for predicting Higher Education (HE) student-athlete and non-athletes’ intentions to self-manage mental health. Students (n = 200) aged 21.10 (SD= 3.73; male = 53%; athlete =69%) completed a questionnaire, and a two-step model building approach was conducted (i.e. confirmatory factor [CFA] and path analysis). Demographic (i.e. female or male; athlete or non-athlete) and IBC (i.e. autonomous and controlled motivation, subjective norms, perceived behavioural control and attitudes) variables were specified as predictors of students’ intentions to self-manage mental health. The factorial validity of the IBC was supported through models achieving satisfactory fit indices. Further, the path model explained a significant proportion of the variance for self-management intentions (R2 = 0.30). Autonomous (β = 0.29) and controlled (β = 0.13) motivation, alongside perceived behavioural control (β = 0.12) and gender (i.e. female; β = 0.12) predicted better self-management intentions. Autonomous motivation also positively predicted attitudes (β = 0.42), subjective norms (β = 0.32) and perceived behavioural control (β = 0.15). The promotion of autonomous motives and enhanced perceived behavioural control may offer the opportunity to facilitate effective self-management of mental health among students. Those involved in designing interventions may consider integrating the IBC for mental health promotion, tailoring interventions to gender and athlete norms.

AB - The objective of this study was to assess the factorial and predictive validity of an Integrated Behaviour Change (IBC) model (Hagger & Chatzarantis, 2014) for predicting Higher Education (HE) student-athlete and non-athletes’ intentions to self-manage mental health. Students (n = 200) aged 21.10 (SD= 3.73; male = 53%; athlete =69%) completed a questionnaire, and a two-step model building approach was conducted (i.e. confirmatory factor [CFA] and path analysis). Demographic (i.e. female or male; athlete or non-athlete) and IBC (i.e. autonomous and controlled motivation, subjective norms, perceived behavioural control and attitudes) variables were specified as predictors of students’ intentions to self-manage mental health. The factorial validity of the IBC was supported through models achieving satisfactory fit indices. Further, the path model explained a significant proportion of the variance for self-management intentions (R2 = 0.30). Autonomous (β = 0.29) and controlled (β = 0.13) motivation, alongside perceived behavioural control (β = 0.12) and gender (i.e. female; β = 0.12) predicted better self-management intentions. Autonomous motivation also positively predicted attitudes (β = 0.42), subjective norms (β = 0.32) and perceived behavioural control (β = 0.15). The promotion of autonomous motives and enhanced perceived behavioural control may offer the opportunity to facilitate effective self-management of mental health among students. Those involved in designing interventions may consider integrating the IBC for mental health promotion, tailoring interventions to gender and athlete norms.

KW - Health

KW - Psychology

KW - Sport

KW - Wellness

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85060345595&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.mhp.2019.01.006

DO - 10.1016/j.mhp.2019.01.006

M3 - Article

VL - 13

SP - 92

EP - 99

JO - Mental Health & Prevention

T2 - Mental Health & Prevention

JF - Mental Health & Prevention

SN - 2212-6570

ER -