Predicting Student-Athlete and Non-Athletes’ Intentions to Self-Manage Mental Health: Testing an Integrated Behaviour Change Model

Stephen Shannon, Gavin Breslin, Tandy Haughey, Nyasha Sarju, Drew Neill, Martin Lawlor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)
3 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The objective of this study was to assess the factorial and predictive validity of an Integrated Behaviour Change (IBC) model (Hagger & Chatzarantis, 2014) for predicting Higher Education (HE) student-athlete and non-athletes’ intentions to self-manage mental health. Students (n = 200) aged 21.10 (SD= 3.73; male = 53%; athlete =69%) completed a questionnaire, and a two-step model building approach was conducted (i.e. confirmatory factor [CFA] and path analysis). Demographic (i.e. female or male; athlete or non-athlete) and IBC (i.e. autonomous and controlled motivation, subjective norms, perceived behavioural control and attitudes) variables were specified as predictors of students’ intentions to self-manage mental health. The factorial validity of the IBC was supported through models achieving satisfactory fit indices. Further, the path model explained a significant proportion of the variance for self-management intentions (R2 = 0.30). Autonomous (β = 0.29) and controlled (β = 0.13) motivation, alongside perceived behavioural control (β = 0.12) and gender (i.e. female; β = 0.12) predicted better self-management intentions. Autonomous motivation also positively predicted attitudes (β = 0.42), subjective norms (β = 0.32) and perceived behavioural control (β = 0.15). The promotion of autonomous motives and enhanced perceived behavioural control may offer the opportunity to facilitate effective self-management of mental health among students. Those involved in designing interventions may consider integrating the IBC for mental health promotion, tailoring interventions to gender and athlete norms.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)92-99
Number of pages8
JournalMental Health & Prevention
Volume13
Early online date17 Jan 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 Mar 2019

Keywords

  • Health
  • Psychology
  • Sport
  • Wellness

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