Predicting functional recovery after acute ankle sprain.

SR O'Connor, Chris M Bleakley, MA Tully, Suzanne McDonough

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Ankle sprains are among the most common acute musculoskeletal conditions presenting to primary care. Their clinical course is variable but there are limited recommendations on prognostic factors. Our primary aim was to identify clinical predictors of short and medium term functional recovery after ankle sprain.METHODS: A secondary analysis of data from adult participants (N = 85) with an acute ankle sprain, enrolled in a randomized controlled trial was undertaken. The predictive value of variables (age, BMI, gender, injury mechanism, previous injury, weight-bearing status, medial joint line pain, pain during weight-bearing dorsiflexion and lateral hop test) recorded at baseline and at 4 weeks post injury were investigated for their prognostic ability. Recovery was determined from measures of subjective ankle function at short (4 weeks) and medium term (4 months) follow ups. Multivariate stepwise linear regression analyses were undertaken to evaluate the association between the aforementioned variables and functional recovery.RESULTS: Greater age, greater injury grade and weight-bearing status at baseline were associated with lower function at 4 weeks post injury (p
LanguageEnglish
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume8
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 5 Aug 2013

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Ankle Injuries
Weight-Bearing
Wounds and Injuries
Humulus
Aptitude
Arthralgia
Ankle
Linear Models
Primary Health Care
Randomized Controlled Trials
Regression Analysis
Pain

Cite this

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Predicting functional recovery after acute ankle sprain. / O'Connor, SR; Bleakley, Chris M; Tully, MA; McDonough, Suzanne.

In: PLoS ONE, Vol. 8, No. 8, 05.08.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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