Powers, liabilities and expertise in community safety: Comparative lessons for 'urban security' from the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland

Daniel Gilling, Gordon Hughes, Matthew Bowden, Adam Edwards, Henry Henry, John Topping

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    11 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This paper begins by outlining and critiquing what we term the dominant anglophone modelof neo-liberal community safety and crime prevention. As an alternative to this influential butflawed model, a comparative analysis is provided of the different constitutional-legal settlements in each of the five jurisdictions across the UK and the Republic of Ireland (ROI), and their uneven institutionalization of community safety. In the light of this it is argued that the nature of the anglophone community safety enterprise is actually subject to significant variation. Summarizing the contours of this variation facilitates our articulation of some core dimensions of community safety. Then, making use of Colebatch’s (2002) deconstruction of policy activity into categories of authority and expertise, and Brunsson’s (2002) distinction between policy talk, decisions and action, we put forward a way of understanding policy activity that avoids the twin dangers of ‘false particularism’ and ‘false universalism’ (Edwards and Hughes, 2005); that indicates a path for further empirical enquiry to assess the ‘reality’ of policy convergence; and that enables the engagement of researchers with normative questions about where community safety should be heading.
    LanguageEnglish
    Pages1-15
    JournalEuropean Journal of Criminology
    Volume0
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 10 Apr 2013

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    liability
    Ireland
    republic
    expertise
    community
    particularism
    crime prevention
    universalism
    institutionalization
    jurisdiction

    Keywords

    • authority
    • community safety
    • comparative criminology
    • constitutional-legal settlements
    • expertise
    • uneven institutionalisation
    • urban security

    Cite this

    Gilling, Daniel ; Hughes, Gordon ; Bowden, Matthew ; Edwards, Adam ; Henry, Henry ; Topping, John. / Powers, liabilities and expertise in community safety: Comparative lessons for 'urban security' from the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland. In: European Journal of Criminology. 2013 ; Vol. 0. pp. 1-15.
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    title = "Powers, liabilities and expertise in community safety: Comparative lessons for 'urban security' from the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland",
    abstract = "This paper begins by outlining and critiquing what we term the dominant anglophone modelof neo-liberal community safety and crime prevention. As an alternative to this influential butflawed model, a comparative analysis is provided of the different constitutional-legal settlements in each of the five jurisdictions across the UK and the Republic of Ireland (ROI), and their uneven institutionalization of community safety. In the light of this it is argued that the nature of the anglophone community safety enterprise is actually subject to significant variation. Summarizing the contours of this variation facilitates our articulation of some core dimensions of community safety. Then, making use of Colebatch’s (2002) deconstruction of policy activity into categories of authority and expertise, and Brunsson’s (2002) distinction between policy talk, decisions and action, we put forward a way of understanding policy activity that avoids the twin dangers of ‘false particularism’ and ‘false universalism’ (Edwards and Hughes, 2005); that indicates a path for further empirical enquiry to assess the ‘reality’ of policy convergence; and that enables the engagement of researchers with normative questions about where community safety should be heading.",
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    author = "Daniel Gilling and Gordon Hughes and Matthew Bowden and Adam Edwards and Henry Henry and John Topping",
    note = "Reference text: Bowden M (2006) Youth, governance and the city: Towards a critical sociology of youth crime and disorder prevention. Youth Studies Ireland 1(1): 19–39. Brunsson N (2002) The Organization of Hypocrisy: Talk, Decisions and Actions in Organizations. Copenhagen: Copenhagen Business School Press. Christie Commission (2011) Report on the Future Delivery of Public Services. Edinburgh: HMSO. Colebatch HK (2002) Policy, 2nd edn. Maidenhead: Open University Press. Crawford A (2009) Introduction: The preventive turn in Europe. In: Crawford A (ed.) Crime Prevention Policies in Comparative Perspective. Cullompton: Willan. Criminal Justice Review Group (2000) Review of the Criminal Justice System in Northern Ireland. A Guide. Belfast: The Stationery Office. Edwards A and Hughes G (2005) Comparing the governance of safety in Europe: A geo-historical approach. Theoretical Criminology 9(3): 345–363. Edwards A and Hughes G (2009) The preventive turn and the promotion of safer communities in England and Wales: Political inventiveness and governmental instabilities. In: Crawford A (ed.) Crime Prevention Policies in Comparative Perspective. Cullompton: Willan. Edwards A and Hughes G (2012) Public safety regimes: Negotiated orders and political analysis in criminology. Criminology and Criminal Justice 12(4): 433–458. ESRC (Economic and Social Research Council) (2006) Final Report of the Devolution and Constitutional Change Programme. URL (accessed 6 March 2013): http://www.devolution.ac.uk/final_report.htm. Fyfe NR and Henry A (2012) Negotiating divergent trends of police reform within the UK. Journal of Police Studies 4: 171–190. Gilling D (2007) Crime Reduction and Community Safety: Labour and the Politics of Local Crime Control. Cullompton: Willan. Government of Ireland (2009) Crime Prevention and Community Safety: White Paper on Crime Discussion Document Number 1. Dublin: Department of Justice, Equality and Law Reform. Henry A (2009) The development of community safety in Scotland: A different path? In: Crawford A (ed.) Crime Prevention Policies in Comparative Perspective. Cullompton: Willan. Hughes G (2007) The Politics of Crime and Community. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. Hughes G and Gilling D (2004) Mission impossible? The habitus of the community safety manager. Criminal Justice 4(2): 129–149. Kilcommins S, O’Donnell I, O’Sullivan E and Vaughan B (2004) Crime, Punishment and the Search for Order in Ireland. Dublin: Institute of Public Administration. Lukes S (1974) Power: A Radical View. London: Macmillan Press. McAra L (2004) The cultural and institutional dynamics of transformation: Youth justice in Scotland and England and Wales. Cambrian Law Review 35: 23–54. Mulcahy A (2012) Exceptional or local? The governance of crime and security in Ireland. In: Hardiman N (ed.) Irish Governance in Crisis. Manchester: Manchester University Press. Stenson K and Lea J (2007) Security, sovereignty and non-state governance from below. Canadian Journal of Law and Society 22(2): 9–28. Topping JR and Byrne J (2012) Community Safety: A Decade of Development, Delivery, Challenge and Change in Northern Ireland. Belfast: Belfast Conflict Resolution Consortium",
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    Powers, liabilities and expertise in community safety: Comparative lessons for 'urban security' from the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland. / Gilling, Daniel; Hughes, Gordon; Bowden, Matthew; Edwards, Adam; Henry, Henry; Topping, John.

    In: European Journal of Criminology, Vol. 0, 10.04.2013, p. 1-15.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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