Portuguese Child Labour: Manufacturing for Change or Continuing Exploitation in the Textiles Industry?

Martin Eaton

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    3 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The prevalence of working children in Portugal is a controversial issue, with more than 24,700 under-14s in employment. The phenomenon is most visible in the textile, clothing and footwear industries (TCF) of the northwest around Oporto. This article presents an overview of the role of Portuguese child labourers. In particular, it focuses upon the TCF sectors, and outlines the causes. It evaluates the reactions to the problem and assesses the likelihood of short-term solutions being successful. In the longer term, it is argued that positive outcomes will be based upon improved education, an alteration in the views of the factory owners, parents and their children, and greater knowledge of innovative working practices among key companies.
    LanguageEnglish
    Pages325-344
    JournalChildhood
    Volume5
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Aug 1998

    Fingerprint

    Textile Industry
    Clothing
    Textiles
    Industry
    Portugal
    Parents
    Education

    Keywords

    • Child labourers
    • Exploitation
    • Industry
    • Portugal
    • Solutions

    Cite this

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    title = "Portuguese Child Labour: Manufacturing for Change or Continuing Exploitation in the Textiles Industry?",
    abstract = "The prevalence of working children in Portugal is a controversial issue, with more than 24,700 under-14s in employment. The phenomenon is most visible in the textile, clothing and footwear industries (TCF) of the northwest around Oporto. This article presents an overview of the role of Portuguese child labourers. In particular, it focuses upon the TCF sectors, and outlines the causes. It evaluates the reactions to the problem and assesses the likelihood of short-term solutions being successful. In the longer term, it is argued that positive outcomes will be based upon improved education, an alteration in the views of the factory owners, parents and their children, and greater knowledge of innovative working practices among key companies.",
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    Portuguese Child Labour: Manufacturing for Change or Continuing Exploitation in the Textiles Industry? / Eaton, Martin.

    In: Childhood, Vol. 5, No. 3, 08.1998, p. 325-344.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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