Portballintrae, Northern Ireland: 116 years of misplaced management

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Portballintrae has had a protracted history of human interference ranging from small-scale sand removal to hard coastal engineering. A small, horse shoe embayment and a once popular seaside destination on the north coast of Northern Ireland, it has suffered from progressive sediment loss over the last 116 years. From a once sediment-abundant system, with a wide sandy beach, it now contains only a limited amount of sand draped over bedrock and/or gravel substrate and a relatively narrow beach. Installation of an obtrusive pier in its western section is thought to have interrupted the natural hydrodynamics and set in motion a progressive longshore transport and removal of sand into deeper water. Successive hard engineering ‘solutions’ prompted through public pressure and engineers keen to do business, have been largely ineffectual, located within a sediment-starved beach system.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationPitfalls of Shoreline Stabilization: selected case studies
Place of PublicationAmsterdam
Pages93-104
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2012

Fingerprint

beach
sand
longshore transport
sediment
coastal engineering
pier
horse
gravel
bedrock
deep water
hydrodynamics
engineering
substrate
coast
history
removal
public
loss

Cite this

Jackson, D. (2012). Portballintrae, Northern Ireland: 116 years of misplaced management. In Pitfalls of Shoreline Stabilization: selected case studies (pp. 93-104). Amsterdam.
Jackson, Derek. / Portballintrae, Northern Ireland: 116 years of misplaced management. Pitfalls of Shoreline Stabilization: selected case studies. Amsterdam, 2012. pp. 93-104
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Jackson, D 2012, Portballintrae, Northern Ireland: 116 years of misplaced management. in Pitfalls of Shoreline Stabilization: selected case studies. Amsterdam, pp. 93-104.

Portballintrae, Northern Ireland: 116 years of misplaced management. / Jackson, Derek.

Pitfalls of Shoreline Stabilization: selected case studies. Amsterdam, 2012. p. 93-104.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Jackson D. Portballintrae, Northern Ireland: 116 years of misplaced management. In Pitfalls of Shoreline Stabilization: selected case studies. Amsterdam. 2012. p. 93-104