POOR-VISIBILITY ROAD ACCIDENTS - THEORIES ENTAILING TARGET RISK LEVEL AND RELATIVE VISUAL-MOTION

Anthony Reinhardt-Rutland

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    5 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Theories about ``target'' risk level are thought to explain why road casualty rates remain steady despite interventions to reduce them. Unfortunately, such theories appear inconsistent with the higher casualty rates associated with poor visibility because they imply that input to the road user is accurately and veridically processed. Motion perception for a driver, however, is highly dependent on relative motion in the retinal image: In poor visibility, the associated processing may be inaccurate and nonveridical. In this article, practical implications regarding conspicuity and lighting are outlined, and the difficulty of developing global theories to explain ``real-world'' activities is shown. Theories to explain the restricted aspects of such activities may be necessary, and the definition of risk may require considerable elaboration or change.
    LanguageEnglish
    Pages63-71
    JournalJournal of Psychology
    Volume126
    Issue number1
    Publication statusPublished - Jan 1992

    Fingerprint

    Accidents
    Motion Perception
    Lighting

    Cite this

    @article{575d021803d0480e8d4f79cc43eda3e2,
    title = "POOR-VISIBILITY ROAD ACCIDENTS - THEORIES ENTAILING TARGET RISK LEVEL AND RELATIVE VISUAL-MOTION",
    abstract = "Theories about ``target'' risk level are thought to explain why road casualty rates remain steady despite interventions to reduce them. Unfortunately, such theories appear inconsistent with the higher casualty rates associated with poor visibility because they imply that input to the road user is accurately and veridically processed. Motion perception for a driver, however, is highly dependent on relative motion in the retinal image: In poor visibility, the associated processing may be inaccurate and nonveridical. In this article, practical implications regarding conspicuity and lighting are outlined, and the difficulty of developing global theories to explain ``real-world'' activities is shown. Theories to explain the restricted aspects of such activities may be necessary, and the definition of risk may require considerable elaboration or change.",
    author = "Anthony Reinhardt-Rutland",
    year = "1992",
    month = "1",
    language = "English",
    volume = "126",
    pages = "63--71",
    journal = "Journal of Psychology",
    issn = "0022-3980",
    number = "1",

    }

    POOR-VISIBILITY ROAD ACCIDENTS - THEORIES ENTAILING TARGET RISK LEVEL AND RELATIVE VISUAL-MOTION. / Reinhardt-Rutland, Anthony.

    In: Journal of Psychology, Vol. 126, No. 1, 01.1992, p. 63-71.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - POOR-VISIBILITY ROAD ACCIDENTS - THEORIES ENTAILING TARGET RISK LEVEL AND RELATIVE VISUAL-MOTION

    AU - Reinhardt-Rutland, Anthony

    PY - 1992/1

    Y1 - 1992/1

    N2 - Theories about ``target'' risk level are thought to explain why road casualty rates remain steady despite interventions to reduce them. Unfortunately, such theories appear inconsistent with the higher casualty rates associated with poor visibility because they imply that input to the road user is accurately and veridically processed. Motion perception for a driver, however, is highly dependent on relative motion in the retinal image: In poor visibility, the associated processing may be inaccurate and nonveridical. In this article, practical implications regarding conspicuity and lighting are outlined, and the difficulty of developing global theories to explain ``real-world'' activities is shown. Theories to explain the restricted aspects of such activities may be necessary, and the definition of risk may require considerable elaboration or change.

    AB - Theories about ``target'' risk level are thought to explain why road casualty rates remain steady despite interventions to reduce them. Unfortunately, such theories appear inconsistent with the higher casualty rates associated with poor visibility because they imply that input to the road user is accurately and veridically processed. Motion perception for a driver, however, is highly dependent on relative motion in the retinal image: In poor visibility, the associated processing may be inaccurate and nonveridical. In this article, practical implications regarding conspicuity and lighting are outlined, and the difficulty of developing global theories to explain ``real-world'' activities is shown. Theories to explain the restricted aspects of such activities may be necessary, and the definition of risk may require considerable elaboration or change.

    M3 - Article

    VL - 126

    SP - 63

    EP - 71

    JO - Journal of Psychology

    T2 - Journal of Psychology

    JF - Journal of Psychology

    SN - 0022-3980

    IS - 1

    ER -