Play, pause, stop, rewind - Supervising final year projects using audio feedback via the VLE - experiences, reflections and practicalities.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

This study aimed to ascertain student and staff attitudes to and perceptions of audio feedback made available via the virtual learning environment (VLE) for formative assessment. Consistent with action research and reflective practice this paper identifies best practice, highlighting issues in relation to implementation with the intention of redesigning activities in light of the findings. It utilises a live case study where audio feedback was provided to students using the Wimba voice email tool within Blackboard Learn+ (BB) for providing formative feedback on final year projects over a 12 week semester. The research was undertaken via staff and student focus groups and the findings indicate that there were clear benefits in terms of student learning and in particular feed-forward learning, as well as benefits for staff in terms of teaching and supporting students. This paper also makes practical recommendations for the implementation of this feedback mechanism, focusing on the most effective use of this digital medium and highlights directions for future research.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationUnknown Host Publication
Number of pages17
Publication statusPublished - May 2015
EventCouncil for Hospitality Management Annual Research Conference - Manchester
Duration: 1 May 2015 → …

Conference

ConferenceCouncil for Hospitality Management Annual Research Conference
Period1/05/15 → …

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learning environment
experience
staff
student
digital media
action research
learning
best practice
semester
Teaching
Group

Keywords

  • Formative feedback
  • media-enhanced feedback
  • audio feedback
  • feed-forward
  • VLEs
  • final year projects.

Cite this

@inproceedings{7518e7b274d04b71bff4dfa65fe50579,
title = "Play, pause, stop, rewind - Supervising final year projects using audio feedback via the VLE - experiences, reflections and practicalities.",
abstract = "This study aimed to ascertain student and staff attitudes to and perceptions of audio feedback made available via the virtual learning environment (VLE) for formative assessment. Consistent with action research and reflective practice this paper identifies best practice, highlighting issues in relation to implementation with the intention of redesigning activities in light of the findings. It utilises a live case study where audio feedback was provided to students using the Wimba voice email tool within Blackboard Learn+ (BB) for providing formative feedback on final year projects over a 12 week semester. The research was undertaken via staff and student focus groups and the findings indicate that there were clear benefits in terms of student learning and in particular feed-forward learning, as well as benefits for staff in terms of teaching and supporting students. This paper also makes practical recommendations for the implementation of this feedback mechanism, focusing on the most effective use of this digital medium and highlights directions for future research.",
keywords = "Formative feedback, media-enhanced feedback, audio feedback, feed-forward, VLEs, final year projects.",
author = "Clare Carruthers and Brenda McCarron and Peter Bolan and Adrian Devine and Una McMahon-Beattie",
note = "Reference text: Carruthers, C. and McCarron, B. (2013) Was that loud enough for you? – Students perceptions and staff reflections of audio feedback. Perspectives on Pedagogy and Practice, 2, 91-109. Carruthers, C., McCarron, B., Bolan, P., Devine, A., McMahon-Beattie. U. and Burns, A (2014) “I like the sound of that” – An evaluation of providing audio feedback via the virtual learning environment for summative assessment. Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education, published online 19th May, 2014, 1-19. DOI: 10.1080/02602938.2014.917145. Carruthers, C., McCarron, B., Bolan, P., Devine, A. and Dr McMahon-Beattie, U. (2013) Listening and Learning: Reflections on the use of audio feedback: An Excellence in Teaching and Learning Note. Business and Management Education in HE: An International Journal, 1 (1), 4-11. DOI: 10.11120/bmhe.2013.00001 Cochrane, B. (2011) Formative audio feedback on work in progress, An Engineering Subject Centre/JISC Case Study, The Higher Education Academy. Available from https://www.heacademy.ac.uk/node/3550, accessed 17/11/14. Dixon, S. (2009) Now I’m a Person: Feedback by audio and text annotation, Conference Proceedings, A Word in Your Ear. December 18th, Sheffield: Sheffield Hallam University. Ekinsmyth, C. (2010) Reflections on using digital audio to give assessment feedback. Planet, 23, 74-77. Ellery, K. (2008) Assessment for learning: a case study using feedback effectively in an essay-style test. Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education, 33 (4), 421-429. Ferguson, L. M., Yonge, O. and Myrick, F. (2004) Students’ involvement in faculty research: Ethical and methodological issues. International Journal of Qualitative Methods, 3 (4), 1-14. Gedye, S. (2010) Formative assessment and feedback: a review. Planet, 23, 40-45. Hennessey, C. and Forrester, G. (2014) Developing a framework for effective audio feedback: a case study. Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education, 39 (7), 777-789. Heinrich, E., Milne, J. and Moore, M. (2009) An investigation into e-tool use for formative assignment assessment – status and recommendations. Educational Technology and Society, 12 (4), 176-192. Ice, P., Curtis., R., Phillips, P. and Wells, J. (2007) Using asynchronous audio feedback to enhance teaching presence and students’ sense of community. Journal of Asynchronous Learning Networks, 11 (2), 3-25. JISC (2010) Audio Feedback, Creating New Digital Media. JISC. Available from http://www.jisc.co.uk, accessed 11/11/14. Jones, O. (2009) The magic bullet: formative assessment with peer and tutor feedback in the VLE. ALT Journal. Winter, 14-17. King, D., McGugan, S. and Bunyan, N. (2008) Does it make a difference? Replacing text with audio feedback. Practice and Evidence of Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education. 3 (2), 145-163. MacGregor, G., Spiers, A. and Taylor, C. (2011) Exploratory evaluation of audio email technology in formative assessment feedback. Research in Learning Technology. 19 (1), 39-59. McKernan, J. (2008) Curriculum and Imagination: Process theory, pedagogy and action research. Oxon: Routledge. McNiff, J. and Whitehead, J. (2010) You and your action research project. Oxon: Routledge Merry, S. and Orsmond, P. (2008) Students’ attitudes to and usage of academic feedback provided via audio files. Bioscience Education ejournal, 11 (3), published online, no pages cited. Mills, C. and Matthews, N. (2009) Review of tutor feedback during undergraduate dissertations: A case study. Journal of Hospitality, Leisure, Sport and Tourism Education. 8 (1), 108-1661. Nicol, D. and Macfarlane-Dick, B. (2007) Formative assessment and self-regulated learning: a model and seven principles of good feedback practice. Studies in Higher Education. 31 (2), 199-218. Nortcliffe, A. and Middleton, A. (2007) Audio feedback for the iPod generation. International Conference on Engineering Education. Coimbra, Portugal. Nortcliffe, A. and Middleton, A. (2008) A three year case study of using audio to blend the engineer’s learning environment. Engineering Education. 3 (2), 45-57. Norton, L (2009) Action Research in Teaching and Learning: A practical guide to conducting pedagogical research in universities. Oxon: Routledge. Price, M., Handley, K., Millar, J. and O’Donovan, B. (2010) Feedback: all that effort, but what is the effect? Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education. 35 (3), 277-289. Rodway-Dyer, S., Knight, J. and Dunne, E. (2011) A case study on audio feedback with geography undergraduates. Journal of Geography in Higher Education. 35 (2), 217-231. Rotheram, B. (2007) Using a MP3 recorder to give feedback on student assignments. Educational Developments. 8 (2), 7-10. Rotheram, B. (2009a) Sounds Good: using audio to give assessment feedback. The Assessments, Learning and Teaching Journal. 7, Winter, Leeds: Leeds Metropolitan University. Rotheram, B. (2009b) Sounds Good: Quicker, better assessment using audio feedback. A JISC funded project, Final Report, Version 1. Available from http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/usersandinnovation/soundsgood.aspx, accessed 27/09/12. Saunders, M., Lewis, P. and Thornhill, A. (2012) Research Methods for Business Students. 6th ed., Harlow: Prentice Hall. Shute, V. J. (2007) Focus on formative feedback. Research Report. Princeton, New Jersey: Educational Testing Service. Taras, M. (2005) Assessment – summative and formative – some theoretical reflections. British Journal of Educational Studies. 53 (4), 466-478. Wingate, U. (2010) The impact of formative feedback on the development of academic writing,. Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education. 25 (5), 519-533.",
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T1 - Play, pause, stop, rewind - Supervising final year projects using audio feedback via the VLE - experiences, reflections and practicalities.

AU - Carruthers, Clare

AU - McCarron, Brenda

AU - Bolan, Peter

AU - Devine, Adrian

AU - McMahon-Beattie, Una

N1 - Reference text: Carruthers, C. and McCarron, B. (2013) Was that loud enough for you? – Students perceptions and staff reflections of audio feedback. Perspectives on Pedagogy and Practice, 2, 91-109. Carruthers, C., McCarron, B., Bolan, P., Devine, A., McMahon-Beattie. U. and Burns, A (2014) “I like the sound of that” – An evaluation of providing audio feedback via the virtual learning environment for summative assessment. Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education, published online 19th May, 2014, 1-19. DOI: 10.1080/02602938.2014.917145. Carruthers, C., McCarron, B., Bolan, P., Devine, A. and Dr McMahon-Beattie, U. (2013) Listening and Learning: Reflections on the use of audio feedback: An Excellence in Teaching and Learning Note. Business and Management Education in HE: An International Journal, 1 (1), 4-11. DOI: 10.11120/bmhe.2013.00001 Cochrane, B. (2011) Formative audio feedback on work in progress, An Engineering Subject Centre/JISC Case Study, The Higher Education Academy. Available from https://www.heacademy.ac.uk/node/3550, accessed 17/11/14. Dixon, S. (2009) Now I’m a Person: Feedback by audio and text annotation, Conference Proceedings, A Word in Your Ear. December 18th, Sheffield: Sheffield Hallam University. Ekinsmyth, C. (2010) Reflections on using digital audio to give assessment feedback. Planet, 23, 74-77. Ellery, K. (2008) Assessment for learning: a case study using feedback effectively in an essay-style test. Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education, 33 (4), 421-429. Ferguson, L. M., Yonge, O. and Myrick, F. (2004) Students’ involvement in faculty research: Ethical and methodological issues. International Journal of Qualitative Methods, 3 (4), 1-14. Gedye, S. (2010) Formative assessment and feedback: a review. Planet, 23, 40-45. Hennessey, C. and Forrester, G. (2014) Developing a framework for effective audio feedback: a case study. Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education, 39 (7), 777-789. Heinrich, E., Milne, J. and Moore, M. (2009) An investigation into e-tool use for formative assignment assessment – status and recommendations. Educational Technology and Society, 12 (4), 176-192. Ice, P., Curtis., R., Phillips, P. and Wells, J. (2007) Using asynchronous audio feedback to enhance teaching presence and students’ sense of community. Journal of Asynchronous Learning Networks, 11 (2), 3-25. JISC (2010) Audio Feedback, Creating New Digital Media. JISC. Available from http://www.jisc.co.uk, accessed 11/11/14. Jones, O. (2009) The magic bullet: formative assessment with peer and tutor feedback in the VLE. ALT Journal. Winter, 14-17. King, D., McGugan, S. and Bunyan, N. (2008) Does it make a difference? Replacing text with audio feedback. Practice and Evidence of Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education. 3 (2), 145-163. MacGregor, G., Spiers, A. and Taylor, C. (2011) Exploratory evaluation of audio email technology in formative assessment feedback. Research in Learning Technology. 19 (1), 39-59. McKernan, J. (2008) Curriculum and Imagination: Process theory, pedagogy and action research. Oxon: Routledge. McNiff, J. and Whitehead, J. (2010) You and your action research project. Oxon: Routledge Merry, S. and Orsmond, P. (2008) Students’ attitudes to and usage of academic feedback provided via audio files. Bioscience Education ejournal, 11 (3), published online, no pages cited. Mills, C. and Matthews, N. (2009) Review of tutor feedback during undergraduate dissertations: A case study. Journal of Hospitality, Leisure, Sport and Tourism Education. 8 (1), 108-1661. Nicol, D. and Macfarlane-Dick, B. (2007) Formative assessment and self-regulated learning: a model and seven principles of good feedback practice. Studies in Higher Education. 31 (2), 199-218. Nortcliffe, A. and Middleton, A. (2007) Audio feedback for the iPod generation. International Conference on Engineering Education. Coimbra, Portugal. Nortcliffe, A. and Middleton, A. (2008) A three year case study of using audio to blend the engineer’s learning environment. Engineering Education. 3 (2), 45-57. Norton, L (2009) Action Research in Teaching and Learning: A practical guide to conducting pedagogical research in universities. Oxon: Routledge. Price, M., Handley, K., Millar, J. and O’Donovan, B. (2010) Feedback: all that effort, but what is the effect? Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education. 35 (3), 277-289. Rodway-Dyer, S., Knight, J. and Dunne, E. (2011) A case study on audio feedback with geography undergraduates. Journal of Geography in Higher Education. 35 (2), 217-231. Rotheram, B. (2007) Using a MP3 recorder to give feedback on student assignments. Educational Developments. 8 (2), 7-10. Rotheram, B. (2009a) Sounds Good: using audio to give assessment feedback. The Assessments, Learning and Teaching Journal. 7, Winter, Leeds: Leeds Metropolitan University. Rotheram, B. (2009b) Sounds Good: Quicker, better assessment using audio feedback. A JISC funded project, Final Report, Version 1. Available from http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/usersandinnovation/soundsgood.aspx, accessed 27/09/12. Saunders, M., Lewis, P. and Thornhill, A. (2012) Research Methods for Business Students. 6th ed., Harlow: Prentice Hall. Shute, V. J. (2007) Focus on formative feedback. Research Report. Princeton, New Jersey: Educational Testing Service. Taras, M. (2005) Assessment – summative and formative – some theoretical reflections. British Journal of Educational Studies. 53 (4), 466-478. Wingate, U. (2010) The impact of formative feedback on the development of academic writing,. Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education. 25 (5), 519-533.

PY - 2015/5

Y1 - 2015/5

N2 - This study aimed to ascertain student and staff attitudes to and perceptions of audio feedback made available via the virtual learning environment (VLE) for formative assessment. Consistent with action research and reflective practice this paper identifies best practice, highlighting issues in relation to implementation with the intention of redesigning activities in light of the findings. It utilises a live case study where audio feedback was provided to students using the Wimba voice email tool within Blackboard Learn+ (BB) for providing formative feedback on final year projects over a 12 week semester. The research was undertaken via staff and student focus groups and the findings indicate that there were clear benefits in terms of student learning and in particular feed-forward learning, as well as benefits for staff in terms of teaching and supporting students. This paper also makes practical recommendations for the implementation of this feedback mechanism, focusing on the most effective use of this digital medium and highlights directions for future research.

AB - This study aimed to ascertain student and staff attitudes to and perceptions of audio feedback made available via the virtual learning environment (VLE) for formative assessment. Consistent with action research and reflective practice this paper identifies best practice, highlighting issues in relation to implementation with the intention of redesigning activities in light of the findings. It utilises a live case study where audio feedback was provided to students using the Wimba voice email tool within Blackboard Learn+ (BB) for providing formative feedback on final year projects over a 12 week semester. The research was undertaken via staff and student focus groups and the findings indicate that there were clear benefits in terms of student learning and in particular feed-forward learning, as well as benefits for staff in terms of teaching and supporting students. This paper also makes practical recommendations for the implementation of this feedback mechanism, focusing on the most effective use of this digital medium and highlights directions for future research.

KW - Formative feedback

KW - media-enhanced feedback

KW - audio feedback

KW - feed-forward

KW - VLEs

KW - final year projects.

M3 - Conference contribution

BT - Unknown Host Publication

ER -