Personality Trait Level and Change as Predictors of Health Outcomes: Findings From a National Study of Americans (MIDUS)

N. A. Turiano, L. Pitzer, Cherie Armour, A. Karlamangla, C. D. Ryff, D. K. Mroczek

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    105 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Objectives.Personality traits predict numerous health outcomes, but previous studies have rarely used personality change to predict health.Methods.The current investigation utilized a large national sample of 3,990 participants from the Midlife in the U.S. study (MIDUS) to examine if both personality trait level and personality change longitudinally predict 3 different health outcomes (i.e., self-rated physical health, self-reported blood pressure, and number of days limited at work or home due to physical health reasons) over a 10-year span.Results.Each of the Big Five traits, except openness, predicted self-rated health. Change in agreeableness, conscientiousness, and extraversion also predicted self-rated health. Trait levels of conscientiousness and neuroticism level predicted self-reported blood pressure. All trait levels except agreeableness predicted number of work days limited. Only change in conscientiousness predicted the number of work days limited.Discussion.Findings demonstrate that a full understanding of the link between personality and health requires consideration of trait change as well as trait level.
    LanguageEnglish
    Pages4-12
    JournalJournals of Gerontology, Series B
    Volume67B
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2012

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    personality traits
    Personality
    Health
    health
    personality change
    Blood Pressure
    neuroticism
    personality
    Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

    Keywords

    • Health
    • Longitudinal change
    • Personality

    Cite this

    Turiano, N. A. ; Pitzer, L. ; Armour, Cherie ; Karlamangla, A. ; Ryff, C. D. ; Mroczek, D. K. / Personality Trait Level and Change as Predictors of Health Outcomes: Findings From a National Study of Americans (MIDUS). In: Journals of Gerontology, Series B. 2012 ; Vol. 67B, No. 1. pp. 4-12.
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    Personality Trait Level and Change as Predictors of Health Outcomes: Findings From a National Study of Americans (MIDUS). / Turiano, N. A.; Pitzer, L.; Armour, Cherie; Karlamangla, A.; Ryff, C. D.; Mroczek, D. K.

    In: Journals of Gerontology, Series B, Vol. 67B, No. 1, 2012, p. 4-12.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    AU - Ryff, C. D.

    AU - Mroczek, D. K.

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