Personality and attitude to microtraining: a correlational study

Owen Hargie, Christine Saunders

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    This study is concerned with an examination of the relationship between student attitude to microtraining, as a form of communication skills training, and personality as measured by Cattell's 16PF. In addition, the extent to which the influence of age, gender and type of course studied will differentially affect student attitude is also explored. The results indicated that students displaying high levels of anxiety reacted significantly more negatively to microtraining, as did students displaying high levels of emotionality. No significant differences emerged in relation to age, gender or type of course studied. These findings are discussed in relation to strategies which might be employed to reduce the anxiety‐provoking effects of microtraining.
    LanguageEnglish
    Pages120-127
    JournalJournal of Further and Higher Education
    Volume14
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1990

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    student
    anxiety
    emotionality
    gender
    communication skills
    examination

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    Hargie, Owen ; Saunders, Christine. / Personality and attitude to microtraining: a correlational study. In: Journal of Further and Higher Education. 1990 ; Vol. 14, No. 1. pp. 120-127.
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    Personality and attitude to microtraining: a correlational study. / Hargie, Owen; Saunders, Christine.

    In: Journal of Further and Higher Education, Vol. 14, No. 1, 1990, p. 120-127.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

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    AU - Saunders, Christine

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    AB - This study is concerned with an examination of the relationship between student attitude to microtraining, as a form of communication skills training, and personality as measured by Cattell's 16PF. In addition, the extent to which the influence of age, gender and type of course studied will differentially affect student attitude is also explored. The results indicated that students displaying high levels of anxiety reacted significantly more negatively to microtraining, as did students displaying high levels of emotionality. No significant differences emerged in relation to age, gender or type of course studied. These findings are discussed in relation to strategies which might be employed to reduce the anxiety‐provoking effects of microtraining.

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