Performing Rape and Sexual Violence on the Contemporary Irish Stage

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

This paper focuses on the staging of the female body in performances of rape or sexual violence – such as On Raftery’s Hill, Pumpgirl and Giselle. The paper seeks to interrogate the silencing of the violated body, and the resulting obstruction of a subjective witnessing to the violence. The enactment of sexual violence is particularly problematic because of its potentially titillating display; because the representation inevitably engages in a range of social and cultural discourses about sex and the body, and because of the possibility that the violence will be erased and replicated as a ‘something else’. This ‘something else’ allows the spectator to evade the ethical demands of witnessing by replacing the violence done to the body, with a rationale that it is only pretend, or is part of the text. The paper seeks to open consideration of staging solutions that render the rape visible to the spectator in the act of reception.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationUnknown Host Publication
Number of pages12
Publication statusPublished - 24 Apr 2010
EventPerformance as Event and its Technologies of Representation - Trinity College Dublin
Duration: 24 Apr 2010 → …

Conference

ConferencePerformance as Event and its Technologies of Representation
Period24/04/10 → …

Fingerprint

Sexual Violence
Rape
Witnessing
Spectator
Female Body
Discourse
Enactment
Reception
Visible
Render

Cite this

@inproceedings{e25c2f51047949d5a5c06625e02cc281,
title = "Performing Rape and Sexual Violence on the Contemporary Irish Stage",
abstract = "This paper focuses on the staging of the female body in performances of rape or sexual violence – such as On Raftery’s Hill, Pumpgirl and Giselle. The paper seeks to interrogate the silencing of the violated body, and the resulting obstruction of a subjective witnessing to the violence. The enactment of sexual violence is particularly problematic because of its potentially titillating display; because the representation inevitably engages in a range of social and cultural discourses about sex and the body, and because of the possibility that the violence will be erased and replicated as a ‘something else’. This ‘something else’ allows the spectator to evade the ethical demands of witnessing by replacing the violence done to the body, with a rationale that it is only pretend, or is part of the text. The paper seeks to open consideration of staging solutions that render the rape visible to the spectator in the act of reception.",
author = "Lisa Fitzpatrick",
note = "Written paper plus documentation of rehearsal process",
year = "2010",
month = "4",
day = "24",
language = "English",
booktitle = "Unknown Host Publication",

}

Fitzpatrick, L 2010, Performing Rape and Sexual Violence on the Contemporary Irish Stage. in Unknown Host Publication. Performance as Event and its Technologies of Representation, 24/04/10.

Performing Rape and Sexual Violence on the Contemporary Irish Stage. / Fitzpatrick, Lisa.

Unknown Host Publication. 2010.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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AB - This paper focuses on the staging of the female body in performances of rape or sexual violence – such as On Raftery’s Hill, Pumpgirl and Giselle. The paper seeks to interrogate the silencing of the violated body, and the resulting obstruction of a subjective witnessing to the violence. The enactment of sexual violence is particularly problematic because of its potentially titillating display; because the representation inevitably engages in a range of social and cultural discourses about sex and the body, and because of the possibility that the violence will be erased and replicated as a ‘something else’. This ‘something else’ allows the spectator to evade the ethical demands of witnessing by replacing the violence done to the body, with a rationale that it is only pretend, or is part of the text. The paper seeks to open consideration of staging solutions that render the rape visible to the spectator in the act of reception.

M3 - Conference contribution

BT - Unknown Host Publication

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