Perceived control over physical and mental well-being: The effects of gender, age and social class

Gavin Breslin, Naomi McCay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In a cross-sectional quota based survey 1013 adults (46% male, 54% female; aged 16–65+) in Northern Ireland from ABC1, C2 and DE social class groupings were asked about the perceived influence they have over their physical and mental health, and what types of lifestyle changes can improve health. Findings showed participants perceive that they have more control over their physical compared to mental health, with physical activity being the behaviour most likely to be adopted. Females were more likely than males to make lifestyle changes, including meeting friends, talking about things that were bothering them and trying relaxation techniques. These findings illustrate the need for health promotion to be directed at mental health, and encouraging males to consider adapting healthy lifestyle behaviours.
LanguageEnglish
JournalJournal of Health Psychology
Volume0
Issue number1-8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2012

Fingerprint

social class
well-being
mental health
gender
health promotion
grouping
health

Cite this

@article{87754a83962145dd8709a707c9a5773c,
title = "Perceived control over physical and mental well-being: The effects of gender, age and social class",
abstract = "In a cross-sectional quota based survey 1013 adults (46{\%} male, 54{\%} female; aged 16–65+) in Northern Ireland from ABC1, C2 and DE social class groupings were asked about the perceived influence they have over their physical and mental health, and what types of lifestyle changes can improve health. Findings showed participants perceive that they have more control over their physical compared to mental health, with physical activity being the behaviour most likely to be adopted. Females were more likely than males to make lifestyle changes, including meeting friends, talking about things that were bothering them and trying relaxation techniques. These findings illustrate the need for health promotion to be directed at mental health, and encouraging males to consider adapting healthy lifestyle behaviours.",
author = "Gavin Breslin and Naomi McCay",
year = "2012",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/1359105312438600",
language = "English",
volume = "0",
journal = "Journal of Health Psychology",
issn = "1359-1053",
number = "1-8",

}

Perceived control over physical and mental well-being: The effects of gender, age and social class. / Breslin, Gavin; McCay, Naomi.

In: Journal of Health Psychology, Vol. 0, No. 1-8, 01.03.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Perceived control over physical and mental well-being: The effects of gender, age and social class

AU - Breslin, Gavin

AU - McCay, Naomi

PY - 2012/3/1

Y1 - 2012/3/1

N2 - In a cross-sectional quota based survey 1013 adults (46% male, 54% female; aged 16–65+) in Northern Ireland from ABC1, C2 and DE social class groupings were asked about the perceived influence they have over their physical and mental health, and what types of lifestyle changes can improve health. Findings showed participants perceive that they have more control over their physical compared to mental health, with physical activity being the behaviour most likely to be adopted. Females were more likely than males to make lifestyle changes, including meeting friends, talking about things that were bothering them and trying relaxation techniques. These findings illustrate the need for health promotion to be directed at mental health, and encouraging males to consider adapting healthy lifestyle behaviours.

AB - In a cross-sectional quota based survey 1013 adults (46% male, 54% female; aged 16–65+) in Northern Ireland from ABC1, C2 and DE social class groupings were asked about the perceived influence they have over their physical and mental health, and what types of lifestyle changes can improve health. Findings showed participants perceive that they have more control over their physical compared to mental health, with physical activity being the behaviour most likely to be adopted. Females were more likely than males to make lifestyle changes, including meeting friends, talking about things that were bothering them and trying relaxation techniques. These findings illustrate the need for health promotion to be directed at mental health, and encouraging males to consider adapting healthy lifestyle behaviours.

U2 - 10.1177/1359105312438600

DO - 10.1177/1359105312438600

M3 - Article

VL - 0

JO - Journal of Health Psychology

T2 - Journal of Health Psychology

JF - Journal of Health Psychology

SN - 1359-1053

IS - 1-8

ER -