Participating in a Collaborative Action Learning Set (CAL): Beginning the Journey

Brendan McCormack, Elizabeth Henderson, Christine Boomer, Ita Collins, David Robinson

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Action learning is being increasingly utilised as a strategy to underpin practitioner focused development and research projects in healthcare generally and nursing in particular. Whilst facilitators of and participants in action learning have a variety of resource materials to guide their practice and participation, there continue to be few systematic and/or evaluative accounts of the experience of participating in action learning for potential action learning participants to draw upon. This paper attempts to address this agenda. The paper presents an interpretive evaluation of the experience of nurses participating in action learning as the learning strategy underpinning a 3-year emancipatory practice development/practitioner research programme. In particular, the paper focuses on the experience of 'joining a learning set'. This focus has been adopted as the theory of action learning emphasises the principle of 'voluntariness', but yet action learning is increasingly being pre-prescribed as a component of development and research programmes. Such was the case with the programme reported on in this paper. The paper describes an approach used to evaluate learning that was adopted in this programme and in particular the initial evaluation stage that focuses on participants' feelings about joining an action learning set. The data collection and analysis processes are described and the key themes arising from the analysis ('self-preservation' versus 'development of self') discussed. It is concluded that working with principles of enlightenment is essential to successful action learning and the transformation of workplace cultures.
    LanguageEnglish
    Pages5-19
    JournalAction Learning: Research and Practice
    Volume5
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2008

    Fingerprint

    learning
    Action learning
    voluntariness
    experience
    learning strategy
    evaluation
    development project
    research and development
    data analysis
    nursing
    research project
    nurse
    workplace
    participation
    resources
    Research program
    Evaluation

    Cite this

    McCormack, Brendan ; Henderson, Elizabeth ; Boomer, Christine ; Collins, Ita ; Robinson, David. / Participating in a Collaborative Action Learning Set (CAL): Beginning the Journey. In: Action Learning: Research and Practice. 2008 ; Vol. 5, No. 1. pp. 5-19.
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    Participating in a Collaborative Action Learning Set (CAL): Beginning the Journey. / McCormack, Brendan; Henderson, Elizabeth; Boomer, Christine; Collins, Ita; Robinson, David.

    In: Action Learning: Research and Practice, Vol. 5, No. 1, 2008, p. 5-19.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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