Organo-mineral complexation alters carbon and nitrogen cycling in stream microbial assemblages

William Ross Hunter, Wolfgang Wanek, Judith Prommer, Maria Mooshammer, Tom Battin

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Inland waters are of global biogeochemical importance receiving carbon inputs of ~ 4.8 Pg C y-1. Of this 12 % is buried, 18 % transported to the oceans, and 70 % supports aquatic secondary production. However, the mechanisms that determine the fate of organic matter (OM) in these systems are poorly defined. One important aspect is the formation of organo-mineral complexes in aquatic systems and their potential as a route for OM transport and burial vs. their use potential as organic carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) sources. Organo-mineral particles form by sorption of dissolved OM to freshly eroded mineral surfaces and may contribute to ecosystem-scale particulate OM fluxes. We tested the availability of mineral-sorbed OM as a C & N source for streamwater microbial assemblages and streambed biofilms. Organo-mineral particles were constructed in vitro by sorption of 13C:15N-labelled amino acids to hydrated kaolin particles, and microbial degradation of these particles compared with equivalent doses of 13C:15N-labelled free amino acids. Experiments were conducted in 120 ml mesocosms over 7 days using biofilms and streamwater sampled from the Oberer Seebach stream (Austria), tracing assimilation and mineralization of 13C and 15N labels from mineral-sorbed and dissolved amino acids.Here we present data on the effects of organo-mineral sorption upon amino acid mineralization and its C:N stoichiometry. Organo-mineral sorption had a significant effect upon microbial activity, restricting C and N mineralization by both the biofilm and streamwater treatments. Distinct differences in community response were observed, with both dissolved and mineral-stabilized amino acids playing an enhanced role in the metabolism of the streamwater microbial community. Mineral-sorption of amino acids differentially affected C & N mineralization and reduced the C:N ratio of the dissolved amino acid pool. The present study demonstrates that organo-mineral complexes restrict microbial degradation of OM and may, consequently, alter the carbon and nitrogen cycling dynamics within aquatic ecosystems.
LanguageUndefined
Title of host publicationGeophysical Research Abstracts
Volume16
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Cite this

Hunter, W. R., Wanek, W., Prommer, J., Mooshammer, M., & Battin, T. (2014). Organo-mineral complexation alters carbon and nitrogen cycling in stream microbial assemblages. In Geophysical Research Abstracts (Vol. 16)
Hunter, William Ross ; Wanek, Wolfgang ; Prommer, Judith ; Mooshammer, Maria ; Battin, Tom. / Organo-mineral complexation alters carbon and nitrogen cycling in stream microbial assemblages. Geophysical Research Abstracts. Vol. 16 2014.
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Hunter, WR, Wanek, W, Prommer, J, Mooshammer, M & Battin, T 2014, Organo-mineral complexation alters carbon and nitrogen cycling in stream microbial assemblages. in Geophysical Research Abstracts. vol. 16.

Organo-mineral complexation alters carbon and nitrogen cycling in stream microbial assemblages. / Hunter, William Ross; Wanek, Wolfgang; Prommer, Judith; Mooshammer, Maria; Battin, Tom.

Geophysical Research Abstracts. Vol. 16 2014.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

TY - CHAP

T1 - Organo-mineral complexation alters carbon and nitrogen cycling in stream microbial assemblages

AU - Hunter, William Ross

AU - Wanek, Wolfgang

AU - Prommer, Judith

AU - Mooshammer, Maria

AU - Battin, Tom

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Inland waters are of global biogeochemical importance receiving carbon inputs of ~ 4.8 Pg C y-1. Of this 12 % is buried, 18 % transported to the oceans, and 70 % supports aquatic secondary production. However, the mechanisms that determine the fate of organic matter (OM) in these systems are poorly defined. One important aspect is the formation of organo-mineral complexes in aquatic systems and their potential as a route for OM transport and burial vs. their use potential as organic carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) sources. Organo-mineral particles form by sorption of dissolved OM to freshly eroded mineral surfaces and may contribute to ecosystem-scale particulate OM fluxes. We tested the availability of mineral-sorbed OM as a C & N source for streamwater microbial assemblages and streambed biofilms. Organo-mineral particles were constructed in vitro by sorption of 13C:15N-labelled amino acids to hydrated kaolin particles, and microbial degradation of these particles compared with equivalent doses of 13C:15N-labelled free amino acids. Experiments were conducted in 120 ml mesocosms over 7 days using biofilms and streamwater sampled from the Oberer Seebach stream (Austria), tracing assimilation and mineralization of 13C and 15N labels from mineral-sorbed and dissolved amino acids.Here we present data on the effects of organo-mineral sorption upon amino acid mineralization and its C:N stoichiometry. Organo-mineral sorption had a significant effect upon microbial activity, restricting C and N mineralization by both the biofilm and streamwater treatments. Distinct differences in community response were observed, with both dissolved and mineral-stabilized amino acids playing an enhanced role in the metabolism of the streamwater microbial community. Mineral-sorption of amino acids differentially affected C & N mineralization and reduced the C:N ratio of the dissolved amino acid pool. The present study demonstrates that organo-mineral complexes restrict microbial degradation of OM and may, consequently, alter the carbon and nitrogen cycling dynamics within aquatic ecosystems.

AB - Inland waters are of global biogeochemical importance receiving carbon inputs of ~ 4.8 Pg C y-1. Of this 12 % is buried, 18 % transported to the oceans, and 70 % supports aquatic secondary production. However, the mechanisms that determine the fate of organic matter (OM) in these systems are poorly defined. One important aspect is the formation of organo-mineral complexes in aquatic systems and their potential as a route for OM transport and burial vs. their use potential as organic carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) sources. Organo-mineral particles form by sorption of dissolved OM to freshly eroded mineral surfaces and may contribute to ecosystem-scale particulate OM fluxes. We tested the availability of mineral-sorbed OM as a C & N source for streamwater microbial assemblages and streambed biofilms. Organo-mineral particles were constructed in vitro by sorption of 13C:15N-labelled amino acids to hydrated kaolin particles, and microbial degradation of these particles compared with equivalent doses of 13C:15N-labelled free amino acids. Experiments were conducted in 120 ml mesocosms over 7 days using biofilms and streamwater sampled from the Oberer Seebach stream (Austria), tracing assimilation and mineralization of 13C and 15N labels from mineral-sorbed and dissolved amino acids.Here we present data on the effects of organo-mineral sorption upon amino acid mineralization and its C:N stoichiometry. Organo-mineral sorption had a significant effect upon microbial activity, restricting C and N mineralization by both the biofilm and streamwater treatments. Distinct differences in community response were observed, with both dissolved and mineral-stabilized amino acids playing an enhanced role in the metabolism of the streamwater microbial community. Mineral-sorption of amino acids differentially affected C & N mineralization and reduced the C:N ratio of the dissolved amino acid pool. The present study demonstrates that organo-mineral complexes restrict microbial degradation of OM and may, consequently, alter the carbon and nitrogen cycling dynamics within aquatic ecosystems.

M3 - Chapter

VL - 16

BT - Geophysical Research Abstracts

ER -

Hunter WR, Wanek W, Prommer J, Mooshammer M, Battin T. Organo-mineral complexation alters carbon and nitrogen cycling in stream microbial assemblages. In Geophysical Research Abstracts. Vol. 16. 2014