Optimal performance in a countermanding saccade task

KongFatt Wong-Lin, Philip Eckhoff, Philip Holmes, Jonathan Cohen

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    22 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Countermanding an action is a fundamental form of cognitive control. In a saccade countermanding task, subjects are instructed that, if a stop signal appears shortly after atarget, they are to maintain fixation rather than to make a saccade to the target. In recentyears, recordings in the frontal eye fields and superior colliculus of behaving non-humanprimates have found correlates of such countermanding behavior in movement and fixationneurons. In this work, we extend a previous neural network model of countermanding toaccount for the high pre-target activity of fixation neurons. We propose that this activityreflects the functioning of control mechanisms responsible for optimizing performance. Wedemonstrate, using computer simulations and mathematical analysis, that pre-targetfixation neuronal activity supports countermanding behavior that maximizes reward rateas a function of the stop signal delay, fraction of stop signal trials, intertrial interval,duration of timeout, and relative reward value. We propose experiments to test thesepredictions regarding optimal behavior.
    LanguageEnglish
    Pages178-187
    JournalBrain Research
    Volume1318
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 8 Mar 2010

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    Eye movements
    Neurons
    Neural networks
    Computer simulation
    Experiments

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    Wong-Lin, KongFatt ; Eckhoff, Philip ; Holmes, Philip ; Cohen, Jonathan. / Optimal performance in a countermanding saccade task. 2010 ; Vol. 1318. pp. 178-187.
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    Optimal performance in a countermanding saccade task. / Wong-Lin, KongFatt; Eckhoff, Philip; Holmes, Philip; Cohen, Jonathan.

    Vol. 1318, 08.03.2010, p. 178-187.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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