Occupational sitting time and its association with work engagement and job demand-control

Fehmidah Munir, Jonathan Houdmont, Stacy Clemes, Kelly Wilson, Robert Kerr, Ken Addley

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Background: Research suggests that high sedentary behaviour (‘sitting time’) has significant deleterious effects on cardio-metabolic and musculoskeletal health, independent of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Adults average about 60% of their waking time and 70-80% of their working time sedentary. Epidemiological and occupational health research provides143support that reducing sitting behaviour and promoting standing and light movement enhances health and wellbeing. However, studies have yet to examine the relationship between occupational sitting and work performance. As a first step to understanding the relationship between occupational sitting and work performance, this study examined whether occupational sitting time was associated with work engagement and job demands.Method: Survey data was analysed from the 2012 STORMONT cohort study. This is a new study tracking a large cohort of employees through and beyond their career with the Northern Ireland Civil Service. 5,235 office-based employees participated in the first wave of data collection focusing on self-report health, wellbeing and working conditions. For this study, individual data on measures of occupational sitting, work engagement and job demands (Management Standards Indicator Tool) were extracted. Occupational sitting time was categorised into Tertiles of low (0-360 minutes), moderate (361-420 minutes) and high sitting time (421-720 minutes). Separate constructs of work engagement were also categorised into Tertiles of low, medium and high work engagement. For job demands, ratios were calculated for high strain, low strain, active jobs and passive jobs. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between moderate occupational sitting time (against low occupational sitting time) and the selected variables, and high occupational sitting time (against low occupational sitting time) and same variables, controlling for age, BMI, physical activity and occupational group. Data were analysed separately for men and women.Results: For men, those who did not meet physical activity guidelines, were smokers, reported low vigour, low dedication, high job strain and passive jobs were more likely to have high occupational sitting times than low occupational sitting times. After controlling for occupational group, only low vigour remained significant. For women, those with low vigour and high absorption were more likely to have high occupational sitting times. After entering control variables into the model, no findings remained significant.Conclusions: The findings suggest that high sitting times are associated with negative work outcomes. This study adds to the sparse literature on occupational sitting time and work performance.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationUnknown Host Publication
Number of pages365
Publication statusPublished - 14 Apr 2014
EventEuropean Academy of Occupational Health Psychology Conference - London
Duration: 14 Apr 2014 → …

Conference

ConferenceEuropean Academy of Occupational Health Psychology Conference
Period14/04/14 → …

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job demand
occupational group
time
health
employee
health report
performance
demand management
civil service
working conditions

Cite this

Munir, F., Houdmont, J., Clemes, S., Wilson, K., Kerr, R., & Addley, K. (2014). Occupational sitting time and its association with work engagement and job demand-control. In Unknown Host Publication
Munir, Fehmidah ; Houdmont, Jonathan ; Clemes, Stacy ; Wilson, Kelly ; Kerr, Robert ; Addley, Ken. / Occupational sitting time and its association with work engagement and job demand-control. Unknown Host Publication. 2014.
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abstract = "Background: Research suggests that high sedentary behaviour (‘sitting time’) has significant deleterious effects on cardio-metabolic and musculoskeletal health, independent of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Adults average about 60{\%} of their waking time and 70-80{\%} of their working time sedentary. Epidemiological and occupational health research provides143support that reducing sitting behaviour and promoting standing and light movement enhances health and wellbeing. However, studies have yet to examine the relationship between occupational sitting and work performance. As a first step to understanding the relationship between occupational sitting and work performance, this study examined whether occupational sitting time was associated with work engagement and job demands.Method: Survey data was analysed from the 2012 STORMONT cohort study. This is a new study tracking a large cohort of employees through and beyond their career with the Northern Ireland Civil Service. 5,235 office-based employees participated in the first wave of data collection focusing on self-report health, wellbeing and working conditions. For this study, individual data on measures of occupational sitting, work engagement and job demands (Management Standards Indicator Tool) were extracted. Occupational sitting time was categorised into Tertiles of low (0-360 minutes), moderate (361-420 minutes) and high sitting time (421-720 minutes). Separate constructs of work engagement were also categorised into Tertiles of low, medium and high work engagement. For job demands, ratios were calculated for high strain, low strain, active jobs and passive jobs. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between moderate occupational sitting time (against low occupational sitting time) and the selected variables, and high occupational sitting time (against low occupational sitting time) and same variables, controlling for age, BMI, physical activity and occupational group. Data were analysed separately for men and women.Results: For men, those who did not meet physical activity guidelines, were smokers, reported low vigour, low dedication, high job strain and passive jobs were more likely to have high occupational sitting times than low occupational sitting times. After controlling for occupational group, only low vigour remained significant. For women, those with low vigour and high absorption were more likely to have high occupational sitting times. After entering control variables into the model, no findings remained significant.Conclusions: The findings suggest that high sitting times are associated with negative work outcomes. This study adds to the sparse literature on occupational sitting time and work performance.",
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Munir, F, Houdmont, J, Clemes, S, Wilson, K, Kerr, R & Addley, K 2014, Occupational sitting time and its association with work engagement and job demand-control. in Unknown Host Publication. European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology Conference, 14/04/14.

Occupational sitting time and its association with work engagement and job demand-control. / Munir, Fehmidah; Houdmont, Jonathan; Clemes, Stacy; Wilson, Kelly; Kerr, Robert; Addley, Ken.

Unknown Host Publication. 2014.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

TY - GEN

T1 - Occupational sitting time and its association with work engagement and job demand-control

AU - Munir, Fehmidah

AU - Houdmont, Jonathan

AU - Clemes, Stacy

AU - Wilson, Kelly

AU - Kerr, Robert

AU - Addley, Ken

PY - 2014/4/14

Y1 - 2014/4/14

N2 - Background: Research suggests that high sedentary behaviour (‘sitting time’) has significant deleterious effects on cardio-metabolic and musculoskeletal health, independent of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Adults average about 60% of their waking time and 70-80% of their working time sedentary. Epidemiological and occupational health research provides143support that reducing sitting behaviour and promoting standing and light movement enhances health and wellbeing. However, studies have yet to examine the relationship between occupational sitting and work performance. As a first step to understanding the relationship between occupational sitting and work performance, this study examined whether occupational sitting time was associated with work engagement and job demands.Method: Survey data was analysed from the 2012 STORMONT cohort study. This is a new study tracking a large cohort of employees through and beyond their career with the Northern Ireland Civil Service. 5,235 office-based employees participated in the first wave of data collection focusing on self-report health, wellbeing and working conditions. For this study, individual data on measures of occupational sitting, work engagement and job demands (Management Standards Indicator Tool) were extracted. Occupational sitting time was categorised into Tertiles of low (0-360 minutes), moderate (361-420 minutes) and high sitting time (421-720 minutes). Separate constructs of work engagement were also categorised into Tertiles of low, medium and high work engagement. For job demands, ratios were calculated for high strain, low strain, active jobs and passive jobs. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between moderate occupational sitting time (against low occupational sitting time) and the selected variables, and high occupational sitting time (against low occupational sitting time) and same variables, controlling for age, BMI, physical activity and occupational group. Data were analysed separately for men and women.Results: For men, those who did not meet physical activity guidelines, were smokers, reported low vigour, low dedication, high job strain and passive jobs were more likely to have high occupational sitting times than low occupational sitting times. After controlling for occupational group, only low vigour remained significant. For women, those with low vigour and high absorption were more likely to have high occupational sitting times. After entering control variables into the model, no findings remained significant.Conclusions: The findings suggest that high sitting times are associated with negative work outcomes. This study adds to the sparse literature on occupational sitting time and work performance.

AB - Background: Research suggests that high sedentary behaviour (‘sitting time’) has significant deleterious effects on cardio-metabolic and musculoskeletal health, independent of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Adults average about 60% of their waking time and 70-80% of their working time sedentary. Epidemiological and occupational health research provides143support that reducing sitting behaviour and promoting standing and light movement enhances health and wellbeing. However, studies have yet to examine the relationship between occupational sitting and work performance. As a first step to understanding the relationship between occupational sitting and work performance, this study examined whether occupational sitting time was associated with work engagement and job demands.Method: Survey data was analysed from the 2012 STORMONT cohort study. This is a new study tracking a large cohort of employees through and beyond their career with the Northern Ireland Civil Service. 5,235 office-based employees participated in the first wave of data collection focusing on self-report health, wellbeing and working conditions. For this study, individual data on measures of occupational sitting, work engagement and job demands (Management Standards Indicator Tool) were extracted. Occupational sitting time was categorised into Tertiles of low (0-360 minutes), moderate (361-420 minutes) and high sitting time (421-720 minutes). Separate constructs of work engagement were also categorised into Tertiles of low, medium and high work engagement. For job demands, ratios were calculated for high strain, low strain, active jobs and passive jobs. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between moderate occupational sitting time (against low occupational sitting time) and the selected variables, and high occupational sitting time (against low occupational sitting time) and same variables, controlling for age, BMI, physical activity and occupational group. Data were analysed separately for men and women.Results: For men, those who did not meet physical activity guidelines, were smokers, reported low vigour, low dedication, high job strain and passive jobs were more likely to have high occupational sitting times than low occupational sitting times. After controlling for occupational group, only low vigour remained significant. For women, those with low vigour and high absorption were more likely to have high occupational sitting times. After entering control variables into the model, no findings remained significant.Conclusions: The findings suggest that high sitting times are associated with negative work outcomes. This study adds to the sparse literature on occupational sitting time and work performance.

M3 - Conference contribution

SN - 978-0-9928786-0-3

BT - Unknown Host Publication

ER -

Munir F, Houdmont J, Clemes S, Wilson K, Kerr R, Addley K. Occupational sitting time and its association with work engagement and job demand-control. In Unknown Host Publication. 2014