Nurses' attitudes towards caring for people with dementia in acute hospital settings: a literature review

Bernie Reid, Ciara Harvey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

People with dementia are often admitted to acute hospital settings and it is essential that nurses recognise their complex needs. However, research shows that this patient group often experiences suboptimal care in acute hospital settings as well as increased mortality rates. This article reports the findings of a literature review into the attitudes of nurses who care for patients with dementia in acute hospital settings. It sets out the findings under four themes: the
unworthy patient, safety before care, breaking routines and knowledge in dementia care. These themes detail nurses’ negative attitudes towards these patients, but also identify that a person-centred approach can support more positive attitudes. The review concludes that acute hospital nurses require education about caring for people with dementia to foster more positive attitudes. Also, there is a need for further research into why nurses hold various attitudes to people with dementia and the association between these attitudes and care outcomes.
Original languageEnglish
Article numberdoi: 10.7748/nop.2020.e1244
Number of pages9
JournalNursing Older People
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 22 Jul 2020

Keywords

  • staff attitudes
  • clinical
  • Dementia
  • dementia awareness
  • neurology
  • older people
  • patients
  • person-centred care
  • professional
  • professional issues

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